252

How do I create and read a value from cookie in JavaScript?

17 Answers 17

223

Here are functions you can use for creating and retrieving cookies.

var createCookie = function(name, value, days) {
    var expires;
    if (days) {
        var date = new Date();
        date.setTime(date.getTime() + (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
        expires = "; expires=" + date.toGMTString();
    }
    else {
        expires = "";
    }
    document.cookie = name + "=" + value + expires + "; path=/";
}

function getCookie(c_name) {
    if (document.cookie.length > 0) {
        c_start = document.cookie.indexOf(c_name + "=");
        if (c_start != -1) {
            c_start = c_start + c_name.length + 1;
            c_end = document.cookie.indexOf(";", c_start);
            if (c_end == -1) {
                c_end = document.cookie.length;
            }
            return unescape(document.cookie.substring(c_start, c_end));
        }
    }
    return "";
}
  • 23
    This doesn't work if your cookie value contains anything that doesn't encode/decode well. The one at w3schools seems to work beautifly – Richard Rout May 20 '13 at 2:07
  • 13
    This simple wrapper from Mozilla has explicit unicode support mentioned as well – Brad Parks May 13 '14 at 11:40
  • 4
    @BradParks Too bad it's released on GPL. – jahu Aug 2 '14 at 22:09
  • 1
    This will not work on IE8 or 9 if the cookie does not have a value, because IE does not add the equal sign (=) after the cookie name. What we do is to check if indexOf("=")==-1, and if so use the entire cookie as the cookie name. – Mohoch Nov 26 '14 at 9:46
  • 1
    If you need ES6 version of this, scroll down for answer stackoverflow.com/a/36763672/1737158 – Lukas Apr 21 '16 at 8:17
40

JQuery Cookies

or plain Javascript:

function setCookie(c_name,value,exdays)
{
   var exdate=new Date();
   exdate.setDate(exdate.getDate() + exdays);
   var c_value=escape(value) + ((exdays==null) ? "" : ("; expires="+exdate.toUTCString()));
   document.cookie=c_name + "=" + c_value;
}

function getCookie(c_name)
{
   var i,x,y,ARRcookies=document.cookie.split(";");
   for (i=0; i<ARRcookies.length; i++)
   {
      x=ARRcookies[i].substr(0,ARRcookies[i].indexOf("="));
      y=ARRcookies[i].substr(ARRcookies[i].indexOf("=")+1);
      x=x.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");
      if (x==c_name)
      {
        return unescape(y);
      }
   }
}
  • 2
    Does this work on all browsers? – Ian Warburton Mar 9 '14 at 19:35
  • 1
    I'm marking this up primarily because you mentioned JQuery Cookies. I would recommend that. The code is very small and if you're using JQuery already, it is just the correct thing to use. – w0rp Mar 23 '14 at 13:44
37

Minimalistic and full featured ES6 approach:

const setCookie = (name, value, days = 7, path = '/') => {
  const expires = new Date(Date.now() + days * 864e5).toUTCString()
  document.cookie = name + '=' + encodeURIComponent(value) + '; expires=' + expires + '; path=' + path
}

const getCookie = (name) => {
  return document.cookie.split('; ').reduce((r, v) => {
    const parts = v.split('=')
    return parts[0] === name ? decodeURIComponent(parts[1]) : r
  }, '')
}

const deleteCookie = (name, path) => {
  setCookie(name, '', -1, path)
}
  • 2
    toGMTString() is deprecated, use toUTCString() instead. – Thanh Nguyen Jun 14 '17 at 8:38
  • @NguyenThanh Thx! Updated – artnikpro Sep 15 '17 at 18:05
  • Sometimes cookie value itself may contain = sign. In that case function getCookie will produce unexpected result. To avoid that consider using following arrow function body inside reduce const [n, ...val] = v.split('='); return n === name ? decodeURIComponent(val.join('=')) : r – Dmitriy Zhura Mar 7 '18 at 16:29
  • Would be nice to have an option to leave the expiry date unset though. This would allow the cookie to be automatically deleted upon browser exit. – xji Oct 23 '18 at 14:55
  • 1
    864e5 = 86400000 = 1000*60*60*24 represents the number of milliseconds in a 24 hour day. – Henrikh Kantuni Dec 2 '18 at 20:41
15

Mozilla provides a simple framework for reading and writing cookies with full unicode support along with examples of how to use it.

Once included on the page, you can set a cookie:

docCookies.setItem(name, value);

read a cookie:

docCookies.getItem(name);

or delete a cookie:

docCookies.removeItem(name);

For example:

// sets a cookie called 'myCookie' with value 'Chocolate Chip'
docCookies.setItem('myCookie', 'Chocolate Chip');

// reads the value of a cookie called 'myCookie' and assigns to variable
var myCookie = docCookies.getItem('myCookie');

// removes the cookie called 'myCookie'
docCookies.removeItem('myCookie');

See more examples and details on Mozilla's document.cookie page.

A version of this simple js file is on github.

6

I've used accepted answer of this thread many times already. It's great piece of code: Simple and usable. But I usually use babel and ES6 and modules, so if you are like me, here is code to copy for faster developing with ES6

Accepted answer rewritten as module with ES6:

export const createCookie = ({name, value, days}) => {
  let expires;
  if (days) {
    let date = new Date();
    date.setTime(date.getTime() + (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
    expires = '; expires=' + date.toGMTString();
  } else {
    expires = '';
  }
  document.cookie = name + '=' + value + expires + '; path=/';
};

export const getCookie = ({name}) => {
  if (document.cookie.length > 0) {
    let c_start = document.cookie.indexOf(name + '=');
    if (c_start !== -1) {
      c_start = c_start + name.length + 1;
      let c_end = document.cookie.indexOf(';', c_start);
      if (c_end === -1) {
        c_end = document.cookie.length;
      }
      return unescape(document.cookie.substring(c_start, c_end));
    }
  }
  return '';
};

And after this you can simply import it as any module (path of course may vary):

import {createCookie, getCookie} from './../helpers/Cookie';
6

For those who need save objects like {foo: 'bar'}, I share my edited version of @KevinBurke's answer. I've added JSON.stringify and JSON.parse, that's all.

cookie = {

    set: function (name, value, days) {
        if (days) {
            var date = new Date();
            date.setTime(date.getTime() + (days * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));
            var expires = "; expires=" + date.toGMTString();
        }
        else
            var expires = "";
        document.cookie = name + "=" + JSON.stringify(value) + expires + "; path=/";
    },

    get : function(name){
        var nameEQ = name + "=",
            ca = document.cookie.split(';');

        for(var i=0;i < ca.length;i++) {
          var c = ca[i];
          while (c.charAt(0)==' ') c = c.substring(1,c.length);
            if (c.indexOf(nameEQ) == 0) 
              return  JSON.parse(c.substring(nameEQ.length,c.length));
        }

        return null;
    }

}

So, now you can do things like this:

cookie.set('cookie_key', {foo: 'bar'}, 30);

cookie.get('cookie_key'); // {foo: 'bar'}

cookie.set('cookie_key', 'baz', 30);

cookie.get('cookie_key'); // 'baz'
6

ES7, using a regex for get(). Based on MDN

const Cookie =
    { get: name => {
        let c = document.cookie.match(`(?:(?:^|.*; *)${name} *= *([^;]*).*$)|^.*$`)[1]
        if (c) return decodeURIComponent(c)
        }
    , set: (name, value, opts = {}) => { 
        if (opts.days) { 
            opts['max-age'] = opts.days * 60 * 60 * 24; 
            delete opts.days 
            }
        opts = Object.entries(opts).reduce((str, [k, v]) => `${str}; ${k}=${v}`, '')
        document.cookie = name + '=' + encodeURIComponent(value) + opts
        }
    , delete: (name, opts) => Cookie.set(name, '', {'max-age': -1, ...opts}) 
    // path & domain must match cookie being deleted 
    }

Cookie.set('user', 'Jim', {path: '/', days: 10}) 
// Set the path to top level (instead of page) and expiration to 10 days (instead of session)

Usage - Cookie.get(name, value [, options]):
options supports all standard cookie options and adds "days":

  • path: '/' - any absolute path. Default: current document location,
  • domain: 'sub.example.com' - may not start with dot. Default: current host without subdomain.
  • secure: true - Only serve cookie over https. Default: false.
  • days: 2 - days till cookie expires. Default: End of session.
    Alternative ways of setting expiration:
    • expires: 'Sun, 18 Feb 2018 16:23:42 GMT' - date of expiry as a GMT string.
      Current date can be gotten with: new Date(Date.now()).toUTCString()
    • 'max-age': 30 - same as days, but in seconds instead of days.

Other answers use "expires" instead of "max-age" to support older IE versions. This method requires ES7, so IE7 is out anyways (this is not a big deal).

Note: Funny characters such as "=" and "{:}" are supported as cookie values, and the regex handles leading and trailing whitespace (from other libs).
If you would like to store objects, either encode them before and after with and JSON.stringify and JSON.parse, edit the above, or add another method. Eg:

Cookie.getJSON = name => JSON.parse(Cookie.get(name))
Cookie.setJSON = (name, value, opts) => Cookie.set(name, JSON.stringify(value), opts);
  • Would the downvoters kindly explain what's wrong with my method? – SamGoody Nov 18 '18 at 9:50
  • looks good, what is better about this then other answers ? – Andrew Nov 29 '18 at 19:12
  • 1
    1. Shorter, and IMO easier to maintain. 2. More complete (is the only answer to accept secure, any order of arguments, max-age). 3. More standard defaults (path etc defaults to the standard, unlike most answers here). 4. Best practice (according to MDN, the regex is the most reliable way to extract the values). 5. Futureprook (if more options are added to cookies, they will be maintained). 6. One object pollutes the code less than a bunch of functions. 7. Get, set and delete and easy to add more methods. 8. ES7 (yummy buzzwords). – SamGoody Nov 29 '18 at 21:40
4

Here's a code to Get, Set and Delete Cookie in JavaScript.

function getCookie(name) {
    name = name + "=";
    var cookies = document.cookie.split(';');
    for(var i = 0; i <cookies.length; i++) {
        var cookie = cookies[i];
        while (cookie.charAt(0)==' ') {
            cookie = cookie.substring(1);
        }
        if (cookie.indexOf(name) == 0) {
            return cookie.substring(name.length,cookie.length);
        }
    }
    return "";
}

function setCookie(name, value, expirydays) {
 var d = new Date();
 d.setTime(d.getTime() + (expirydays*24*60*60*1000));
 var expires = "expires="+ d.toUTCString();
 document.cookie = name + "=" + value + "; " + expires;
}

function deleteCookie(name){
  setCookie(name,"",-1);
}

Source: http://mycodingtricks.com/snippets/javascript/javascript-cookies/

2

I use this object. Values are encoded, so it's necessary to consider it when reading or writing from server side.

cookie = (function() {

/**
 * Sets a cookie value. seconds parameter is optional
 */
var set = function(name, value, seconds) {
    var expires = seconds ? '; expires=' + new Date(new Date().getTime() + seconds * 1000).toGMTString() : '';
    document.cookie = name + '=' + encodeURIComponent(value) + expires + '; path=/';
};

var map = function() {
    var map = {};
    var kvs = document.cookie.split('; ');
    for (var i = 0; i < kvs.length; i++) {
        var kv = kvs[i].split('=');
        map[kv[0]] = decodeURIComponent(kv[1]);
    }
    return map;
};

var get = function(name) {
    return map()[name];
};

var remove = function(name) {
    set(name, '', -1);
};

return {
    set: set,
    get: get,
    remove: remove,
    map: map
};

})();
0

Simple way to read cookies in ES6.

function getCookies() {
    var cookies = {};
    for (let cookie of document.cookie.split('; ')) {
        let [name, value] = cookie.split("=");
        cookies[name] = decodeURIComponent(value);
    }
    console.dir(cookies);
}
0

I've used js-cookie to success.

<script src="/path/to/js.cookie.js"></script>
<script>
  Cookies.set('foo', 'bar');
  Cookies.get('foo');
</script>
0

You can use my cookie ES module for get/set/remove cookie.

Usage:

In your head tag, include the following code:

<script src="https://raw.githack.com/anhr/cookieNodeJS/master/build/cookie.js"></script>

or

<script src="https://raw.githack.com/anhr/cookieNodeJS/master/build/cookie.min.js"></script>

Now you can use window.cookie for store user information in web pages.

cookie.isEnabled()

Is the cookie enabled in your web browser?

returns {boolean} true if cookie enabled.

Example

if ( cookie.isEnabled() )
    console.log('cookie is enabled on your browser');
else
    console.error('cookie is disabled on your browser');

cookie.set( name, value )

Set a cookie.

name: cookie name.
value: cookie value.

Example

cookie.set('age', 25);

cookie.get( name[, defaultValue] );

get a cookie.

name: cookie name.
defaultValue: cookie default value. Default is undefined.
returns cookie value or defaultValue if cookie was not found
Example
var age = cookie.get('age', 25);

cookie.remove( name );

Remove cookie.

name: cookie name.
Example
cookie.remove( 'age' );

Example of usage

-1

An improved version of the readCookie:

function readCookie( name )
{
    var cookieParts = document.cookie.split( ';' )
    ,   i           = 0
    ,   part
    ,   part_data
    ,   value
    ;

    while( part = cookieParts[ i++ ] )
    {
        part_data = part.split( '=' );

        if ( part_data.shift().replace(/\s/, '' ) === name )
        {
            value = part_data.shift();
            break;
        }

    }
    return value;
}

This should break as soon as you have found your cookie value and return its value. In my opinion very elegant with the double split.

The replace on the if-condition is a white space trim, to make sure it matches correctly

-1
function setCookie(cname,cvalue,exdays) {
    var d = new Date();
    d.setTime(d.getTime() + (exdays*24*60*60*1000));
    var expires = "expires=" + d.toGMTString();
    document.cookie = cname+"="+cvalue+"; "+expires;
}

function getCookie(cname) {
    var name = cname + "=";
    var ca = document.cookie.split(';');
    for(var i=0; i<ca.length; i++) {
        var c = ca[i];
        while (c.charAt(0)==' ') c = c.substring(1);
        if (c.indexOf(name) == 0) {
            return c.substring(name.length, c.length);
        }
    }
    return "";
}

function checkCookie() {
    var user=getCookie("username");
    if (user != "") {
        alert("Welcome again " + user);
    } else {
       user = prompt("Please enter your name:","");
       if (user != "" && user != null) {
           setCookie("username", user, 30);
       }
    }
}
-1

I have written simple cookieUtils, it has three functions for creating the cookie, reading the cookie and deleting the cookie.

var CookieUtils = {
    createCookie: function (name, value, expireTime) {
        expireTime = !!expireTime ? expireTime : (15 * 60 * 1000); // Default 15 min
        var date = new Date();
        date.setTime(date.getTime() + expireTime);
        var expires = "; expires=" + date.toGMTString();
        document.cookie = name + "=" + value + expires + "; path=/";
    },
    getCookie: function (name) {
        var value = "; " + document.cookie;
        var parts = value.split("; " + name + "=");
        if (parts.length == 2) {
            return parts.pop().split(";").shift();
        }
    },
    deleteCookie: function(name) {
        document.cookie = name +'=; Path=/; Expires=Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:01 GMT;';
    }
};
-1

A cheeky and simple way of reading a cookie could be something like:

let username, id; 
eval(document.cookie); 
console.log(username + ", " + id); // John Doe, 123

This could be used if you know your cookie contains something like: username="John Doe"; id=123;. Note that a string would need quotes in the cookie. Not the recommended way probably, but works for testing/learning.

-1

Here is the example from w3chools that was mentioned.

function setCookie(cname, cvalue, exdays) {
    var d = new Date();
    d.setTime(d.getTime() + (exdays*24*60*60*1000));
    var expires = "expires="+ d.toUTCString();
    document.cookie = cname + "=" + cvalue + ";" + expires + ";path=/";
}

function getCookie(cname) {
    var name = cname + "=";
    var decodedCookie = decodeURIComponent(document.cookie);
    var ca = decodedCookie.split(';');
    for(var i = 0; i <ca.length; i++) {
        var c = ca[i];
        while (c.charAt(0) == ' ') {
            c = c.substring(1);
        }
        if (c.indexOf(name) == 0) {
            return c.substring(name.length, c.length);
        }
    }
    return "";
}

protected by Bill the Lizard Mar 2 '15 at 15:40

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