45
function test(){         
     if(this === null){
        console.log("This is null");
     }else{
         console.log("This is Object");
     }
 }
test.call(null);
test.call({});

Output :

This is Object.

This is Object.

But I expect Output :

This is Null.

This is Object.

Why Null not set in context ?

3
  • Possible duplicate of Applying a Function to Null in Javascript Jan 15, 2018 at 6:25
  • 2
    @Mr.Developer It doesn't seem to be similar. The function in that question doesn't use this at all, he just wondered why null was allowed in .call().
    – Barmar
    Jan 15, 2018 at 6:30
  • 1
    @ObethSamuel: What do you feel is not credible/official about MDN, from which Tushar's existing answer is drawn?
    – eggyal
    Jan 18, 2018 at 9:55

4 Answers 4

59

Quoting from MDN

if the method is a function in non-strict mode, null and undefined will be replaced with the global object and primitive values will be converted to objects.

This explains why you get an object when you call test.call(null);. When null is passed here, this inside test() will be global object Window.

For the desired behavior, use strict mode.

function test() {
  "use strict";
  if (this === null) {
    console.log("This is null");
  } else {
    console.log("This is Object");
  }
}
test.call(null);
test.call({});

Quoting from ES6 Specifications for strict mode

If this is evaluated within strict mode code, then the this value is not coerced to an object. A this value of null or undefined is not converted to the global object and primitive values are not converted to wrapper objects. The this value passed via a function call (including calls made using Function.prototype.apply and Function.prototype.call) do not coerce the passed this value to an object

4
+25

What does the 'this' indicate? you can use console.log(this); to know it. But as answer, use an input (here I called it input) and test it.

   function test(input){
 if(input=== null){
    console.log("This is null");
 }else{
     console.log("This is Object");
 }
 }
test(null);
test({});

0

http://es5.github.io/#x15.3.4.4

NOTE The thisArg value is passed without modification as the this value. This is a change from Edition 3, where a undefined or null thisArg is replaced with the global object and ToObject is applied to all other values and that result is passed as the this value.

In your case you are not in strict mode, if you set strict mode this can be set to anything you want. Be careful though, you can end up referencing things you do not want to by accident.

//global object being set, since this can't be null
function test(){         
     if(this === null){
        console.log("This is null");
     }else{
         console.log("This is Object");
     }
 }
test.call(null);
test.call({});

//example of strict returning null
function test2(){  
"use strict";
     if(this === null){
        console.log("This is null");
     }else{
         console.log("This is Object");
     }
 }
test2.call(null);
test2.call({});

0

As @Tushar mentioned in his answer:

this inside test() will be global object Window

.

On the other hand, your function has not argument and as @Elnaz mentioned in her answer you can add an argument to it to get the null from caller inside the function and I want add this note:

Also you can get null value in the output in a function without parameter by arguments[0] when you call your function with test(null)

function test(){  
     input=arguments[0];       
     if(input === null){
        console.log("This is null");
     }else{
         console.log("This is Object");
     }
 }
test(null);
test({});

Or with arguments[1] when you call it by test.call(this,null):

function test(){  
     input=arguments[0];       
     if(input === null){
        console.log("This is null");
     }else{
         console.log("This is Object");
     }
 }
test.call(this,null);
test.call(this,{});

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