28

When testing my code I noticed a significant increase in execution time when the empty ranged-for loop was deleted or not. Normally I would think that the compiler would notice that the for loop serves no purpose and would therefor be ignored. As the compiler flags I am using -O3 (gcc 5.4). I also tested it with a vector instead of a set and that seems to work and give the same execution time in both cases. It seems that the incrementation of the iterator costs all the extra time.

First case with the ranged for loop still present (slow):

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
int main () {
    long result;
    std::set<double> results;
    for (int i = 2; i <= 10000; ++i) {
        results.insert(i);
        for (auto element : results) {
            // no operation
        }
    }
    std::cout << "Result: " << result << "\n";
}

Second case with the ranged for loop deleted (fast):

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
int main () {
    long result;
    std::set<double> results;
    for (int i = 2; i <= 10000; ++i) {
        results.insert(i);
    }
    std::cout << "Result: " << result << "\n";
}
  • 3
    In some cases -O3 might actually be worse than -O2. Try using -O2, and also take a look at the generated code. – Some programmer dude Jan 15 '18 at 9:04
  • 2
    Looking at this in godbolt, it seems the compiler fails to optimize away the std::set::iterator increments (i.e. this issue is also present when using a "regular" for-loop using iterators). No clue why the compiler doesn't optimize this loop away though. – Darhuuk Jan 15 '18 at 9:09
  • 4
    After looking at the disassembly, I confirm that neither gcc nor clang nor VS optimize this with O2 O3 or Os – Guillaume Gris Jan 15 '18 at 9:09
  • 6
    Do you see the same effect with other containers (including std::array)? If not, then it's likely that the set's iterators are too complex for the optimizer. – Toby Speight Jan 15 '18 at 9:40
  • 7
    @manni66 and whoever thinks that all production code is handwritten should slow down their judgement... – Quentin Jan 15 '18 at 9:50
23

Internally std::set iterator uses some kind of pointer chain. This seems to be the issue.

Here is a minimal setup similar to your issue:

struct S
{
    S* next;
};

void f (S* s) {
    while (s)
        s = s->next;
}

It's not a problem with complex collection implementations or overhead of iterators but simply this pointer chain pattern that the optimizer can't optimize.

I don't know the precise reason why optimizers fail on this pattern though.

Also, note that this variant is optimized away:

void f (S* s) {
    // Copy paste as many times as you wish the following two lines
    if(s)
        s = s->next;
}

Edit

As suggested by @hvd this might have to do with the compiler not being able to prove the loop is not infinite. And if we write the OP loop like so:

void f(std::set<double>& s)
{
    auto it = s.begin();
    for (size_t i = 0; i < s.size() && it != s.end(); ++i, ++it)
    {
        // Do nothing
    }
}

The compiler optimizes everything away.

  • 1
    If s->next points at garbage then the next iteration may potentially crash - so if that was optimized out, a bug in the code wouldn't manifest itself. That said, I don't know if that's a potential reason - just theoretizing. – CookiePLMonster Jan 15 '18 at 10:27
  • 21
    @CookiePLMonster The compiler is allowed to assume that undefined behavior never occurs. So this is not a valid reason to prevent optimization here. – ComicSansMS Jan 15 '18 at 10:31
  • 1
    @CookiePLMonster, if s->next points at garbage, then you're into Undefined Behaviour, and the optimiser isn't required to make it crash. – Toby Speight Jan 15 '18 at 10:31
  • 1
    std::set is definitely not required to use std::list::iterator. I guess some implementation might, but it's hardly universal. – Useless Jan 15 '18 at 10:34
  • 15
    If s->next == s, then the loop is infinite. Although compilers are nowadays allowed to optimise away infinite loops, they do generally still attempt to preserve intentionally potentially infinite loops, and it may well be that in this case, the compiler cannot detect that this is not intended to possibly be infinite. – user743382 Jan 15 '18 at 10:35
9

The range based for loop is not as trivial as it looks. It is translated to an iterator-based loop internally in the compiler and if the iterator is complex enough the compiler may not even be allowed by the standard to remove these iterator operations.

6

You could play around with clang optimization report. Compile your code with save-optimization-record enabled, so optimization report will be dumped to main.opt.yaml.

clang++ -std=c++11 main.cpp -O2 -fsave-optimization-record


You will see that there are several problems with the loop:

Clang thinks, that there is a value modified in this loop.

- String: value that could not be identified as reduction is used outside the loop

Also, the compiler can't compute the number of loop iterations.

- String: could not determine number of loop iterations

Note, that compiler successfully inlined begin, end, operator++ and operator=.

6

Range-for is "syntactic sugar", meaning what it does is simply provide short-hand notation for something that can be expressed in more verbose manner. For example, range-for transforms into something like this.

for (Type obj : container) ->

auto endpos = container.end();
for ( auto iter=container.begin(); iter != endpos; ++iter)
{
     Type obj(*iter);
     // your code here
}

Now the problem is that begin/end/*iter/++iter/(obj = ) are function-calls. In order to optimize them out, the compiler needs to know that they have no side-effects, (changes to global state). Whether the compiler can do this or not is implementation defined, and will depend on the container type. What I can say though, in most case you do not need the (obj =) function, so prefer

for (const auto& X: cont) 

or ...

for (auto& X: cont)

to ...

for (auto X : cont)

You might find that simplifies it enough for optimizations to kick in.

  • These changes unfortunately don't do anything to improve the generated assembly. – Darhuuk Jan 15 '18 at 14:07

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