I found this question on the web.

Given a stack S, write a C program to sort the stack (in the ascending order). We are not allowed to make any assumptions about how the stack is implemented. The only functions to be used are:

Push
Pop
Top
IsEmpty
IsFull

I think we can build heap and sort it. What is optimal solution to this?

  • 1
    Provide a link please. As stated, you could just copy to any other structure, sort that, and copy it back in. O(1) additional memory use is the critical requirement. – Potatoswatter Jan 28 '11 at 8:43
  • 4
    O(1) additional memory is provably impossible. If the bottom two elements of the stack need to be swapped, all elements above need to be moved to additional storage. This is O(N). – MSalters Jan 28 '11 at 8:46
  • 23
    Why the hell would you want to sort a stack? – leppie Jan 28 '11 at 8:48
  • 1
    @MSalters: Yep. I think the only good answers to this question are "can't do it" and "duh." – Potatoswatter Jan 28 '11 at 8:49
  • 3
    To me it sounds like "The Tower of Hanoi" problem: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towers_of_Hanoi. The task is a little different, but I think you could start with it. – user346034 Jan 28 '11 at 9:25

13 Answers 13

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Assuming that the only data structure allowed here is the Stack, then you could use 2 Stacks.

Iterate until the original stack is empty and in each iteration, pop an element from the original stack, while the top element in the second stack is bigger than the removed element, pop the second stack and push it to the original stack. Now you can push the element you originally popped off the original stack to the second stack.

The time complexity of this approach is O(N^2).

C code to implement this algorithm would be (excuse my rusty C skills):

void SortStack(struct Stack * orig_stack)
{
  struct Stack helper_stack;
  while (!IsEmpty(orig_stack))
  {
    int element = Pop(orig_stack);
    while (!IsEmpty(&helper_stack) && Top(&helper_stack) < element)
    {
      Push(orig_stack, Pop(&helper_stack));
    }
    Push(&helper_stack, element);
  }
  while (!IsEmpty(&helper_stack))
  {
    Push(orig_stack, Pop(&helper_stack));
  }
}
  • Isn't that just insertion sort where you manually use a stack to handle recursion? – Michael J. Barber Jan 28 '11 at 9:54
  • The O(n^2) complexity here is questionable, because a single element can enter and leave orig_stack multiple times. Thus, amount of iterations of the outer while loop will be much more than n. – Nikita Rybak Jan 28 '11 at 10:10
  • 1
    @Nikita: Let's try to look at the worst case scenario (in terms of number of times an element goes back and forth b/w the stacks). This would be when the original stack is already sorted. Now let's look at the element that will "travel" the most. This would be the topmost element in the original stack and it would "travel" O(n) times. Extending to the rest of the elements, we'll have approx 2 * (1+2+3+...+n) "travels". This means we get O(n^2). – OrenD Jan 28 '11 at 10:35
  • @OrenD How exactly did you identify worst-case scenario? For example, for standard quick-sort (with pivot in the middle), worst-case O(n^2) scenario is very tricky. Both sorted and inverse-sorted arrays will run in O(n*logn) there, but that proves nothing. – Nikita Rybak Jan 28 '11 at 10:38
  • @OrenD I do suspect this is O(n^2), but you can't really claim it with no proof. – Nikita Rybak Jan 28 '11 at 10:39

Given those stack operations, you could write a recursive insertion sort.

void sort(stack s) {
    if (!IsEmpty(s)) {
        int x = Pop(s);
        sort(s);
        insert(s, x);
    }
}

void insert(stack s, int x) {
    if (!IsEmpty(s)) {  
        int y = Top(s);
        if (x < y) {
            Pop(s);
            insert(s, x);
            Push(s, y);
        } else {
            Push(s, x);
        }
    } else {
        Push(s, x); 
    }
}
  • 2
    +1 I like this solution, it nicely abuses the call stack as additional data structure :-) – Axarydax Jan 28 '11 at 13:49

It can be done recursively using the same stack. O(n^2) I have coded it in C++ but the conversion to C is trivial. I just like templates and you did tag your question as C++

template<typename T>
void Insert(const T& element, Stack<T>& stack)
{
  if(element > stack.Top())
  {
    T top = stack.Pop();
    Insert(element, stack);
    stack.Push(top);
  }
  else
  {
    stack.Push(element);
  }
}

template<typename T>
void StackSort(Stack<T>& stack)
{
  if(!stack.IsEmpty())
  {
    T top = stack.Pop();
    StackSort(stack);
    Insert(top, stack);    
  }    
}

Edited to get my vote back! :))

  • Nope, your code is not correct. you first element will never change his place. – UmmaGumma Jan 28 '11 at 9:17
  • sorry your solution is fully correct. But now I can't undo my downvote until you will edit something in your post. Edit something and I will upvote your solution. – UmmaGumma Jan 28 '11 at 10:05
  • @Ashot Martirosyan - I have edited. Thanks. I haven't compiled but the idea should be correct. – T33C Jan 28 '11 at 10:29
  • I would say, there's implicit another stack, although the idea seems workable. – Nikita Rybak Jan 28 '11 at 10:57

Pancake sort is another interesting way to do this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pancake_sorting#cite_note-4.

Modified code from T33C's answer
(given before Svante corrected the language tag from c++ to c):
stack.top() can only be checked if !stack.empty()

void insert(int element, stack<int> &stack) {
    if (!stack.empty() && element > stack.top()) {
        int top = stack.top();
        stack.pop();
        insert(element, stack);
        stack.push(top);
    }
    else {
        stack.push(element);
    } 
}

void sortStack(stack<int> & stack) {
    if (!stack.empty()) {
        int top = stack.top();
        stack.pop();
        sortStack(stack);
        insert(top, stack);
    }
}
  • (apart from inconsistent indentation -) What is the intention with this post? – greybeard Aug 6 '16 at 17:24
  • when there is only one element in the stack, T33c's origin code doesn't check if the stack is empty when do insertion, which will throw exception in Insert function. – B.W Aug 20 '16 at 20:08
  • top() when stack may be empty: Not a bad catch. – greybeard Aug 21 '16 at 10:52

3 stack sort using polyphase merge sort

This should be the fastest way to implement a 3 stack sort. The goal is to end up with an ascending sequence as items are popped from a sorted stack.

Wiki article for polyphase merge sort (using arrays):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphase_merge_sort

Example C++ code for 3 stack polyphase sort, using pointers, a pointer as a stack pointer for each stack, and a pointer to the end of each run and the end of each stack. The run size pointer is used to keep track of when the run size increments or decrements mid stack. A descending sequence flag is used to keep track if sequences are descending or ascending as data is transferred between stacks. It is initialized at the start, and then alternates after every pair of runs is merged.

typedef unsigned int uint32_t;

static size_t fibtbl[48] =
    {        0,         1,         1,         2,         3,         5,
             8,        13,        21,        34,        55,        89,
           144,       233,       377,       610,       987,      1597,
          2584,      4181,      6765,     10946,     17711,     28657,
         46368,     75025,    121393,    196418,    317811,    514229,
        832040,   1346269,   2178309,   3524578,   5702887,   9227465,
      14930352,  24157817,  39088169,  63245986, 102334155, 165580141,
     267914296, 433494437, 701408733,1134903170,1836311903,2971215073};

// binary search: return index of largest fib() <= n
size_t flfib(size_t n)
{
size_t lo = 0;
size_t hi = sizeof(fibtbl)/sizeof(fibtbl[0]);
    while((hi - lo) > 1){
        size_t i = (lo + hi)/2;
        if(n < fibtbl[i]){
            hi = i;
            continue;
        }
        if(n > fibtbl[i]){
            lo = i;
            continue;
        }
        return i;
    }
    return lo;
}

// poly phase merge sort array using 3 arrays as stacks, a is source
uint32_t * ppmrg3s(uint32_t a[], uint32_t b[], uint32_t c[], size_t n)
{
    if(n < 2)
        return a+n;
    uint32_t *asp = a;                  // a stack ptr
    uint32_t *aer;                      // a end run
    uint32_t *aes = a + n;              // a end
    uint32_t *bsp = b + n;              // b stack ptr
    uint32_t *ber;                      // b end run
    uint32_t *bes = b + n;              // b end
    uint32_t *csp = c + n;              // c stack ptr
    uint32_t *ces = c + n;              // c end
    uint32_t *rsp = 0;                  // run size change stack ptr
    size_t ars = 1;                     // run sizes
    size_t brs = 1;
    size_t scv = 0-1;                   // size change increment / decrement
    bool dsf;                           // == 1 if descending sequence
    {                                   // block for local variable scope
        size_t f = flfib(n);            // fibtbl[f+1] > n >= fibtbl[f]
        dsf = ((f%3) == 0);             // init compare flag
        if(fibtbl[f] == n){             // if exact fibonacci size, move to b
            for(size_t i = 0; i < fibtbl[f-1]; i++)
                *(--bsp) = *(asp++);
        } else {                        // else move to b, c
            // update compare flag
            dsf ^= (n - fibtbl[f]) & 1;
            // move excess elements to b
            aer = a + n - fibtbl[f];
            while (asp < aer)
                *(--bsp) = *(asp++);
            // move dummy count elements to c
            aer = a + fibtbl[f - 1];
            while (asp < aer)
                *(--csp) = *(asp++);
            rsp = csp;                  // set run size change ptr
        }
    }                                   // end local variable block
    while(1){                           // setup to merge pair of runs
        if(asp == rsp){                 // check for size count change
            ars += scv;                 //   (due to dummy run size == 0)
            scv = 0-scv;
            rsp = csp;
        }
        if(bsp == rsp){
            brs += scv;
            scv = 0-scv;
            rsp = csp;
        }
        aer = asp + ars;                // init end run ptrs
        ber = bsp + brs;
        while(1){                       // merging pair of runs
            if(dsf ^ (*asp <= *bsp)){   // if a <= b
                *(--csp) = *(asp++);    //   move a to c
                if(asp != aer)          //   if not end a run
                    continue;           //     continue back to compare
                do                      //   else move rest of b run to c
                    *(--csp) = *(bsp++);
                while (bsp < ber);
                break;                  //     and break
            } else {                    // else a > b
                *(--csp) = *(bsp++);    //   move b to c
                if(bsp != ber)          //   if not end b run
                    continue;           //     continue back to compare
                do                      //   else move rest of a run to c
                    *(--csp) = *(asp++);
                while (asp < aer);
                break;                  //     and break
            }
        }                               // end merging pair of runs
        dsf ^= 1;                       // toggle compare flag
        if(bsp == bes){                 // if b empty
            if(asp == aes)              //   if a empty, done
                break;
            std::swap(bsp, csp);        //   swap b, c
            std::swap(bes, ces);
            brs += ars;                 //   update run size
        } else {                        // else b not empty
            if(asp != aes)              //   if a not empty
                continue;               //     continue back to setup next merge
            std::swap(asp, csp);        //   swap a, c
            std::swap(aes, ces);
            ars += brs;                 //   update run size
        }
    }
    return csp;                          // return ptr to sorted array
}

Example java code for sorting using a custom stack class (xstack) that includes a swap function.

static final int[] FIBTBL =
{        0,         1,         1,         2,         3,         5,
         8,        13,        21,        34,        55,        89,
       144,       233,       377,       610,       987,      1597,
      2584,      4181,      6765,     10946,     17711,     28657,
     46368,     75025,    121393,    196418,    317811,    514229,
    832040,   1346269,   2178309,   3524578,   5702887,   9227465,
  14930352,  24157817,  39088169,  63245986, 102334155, 165580141,
 267914296, 433494437, 701408733,1134903170,1836311903};

// return index of largest fib() <= n
static int flfib(int n)
{
int lo = 0;
int hi = 47;
    while((hi - lo) > 1){
        int i = (lo + hi)/2;
        if(n < FIBTBL[i]){
            hi = i;
            continue;
        }
        if(n > FIBTBL[i]){
            lo = i;
            continue;
        }
        return i;
    }
    return lo;
}

// poly phase merge sort using 3 stacks
static void ppmrg3s(xstack a, xstack b, xstack c)
{
    if(a.size() < 2)
        return;
    int ars = 1;                        // init run sizes
    int brs = 1;
    int asc = 0;                        // no size change
    int bsc = 0;
    int csc = 0;
    int scv = 0-1;                      // size change value
    boolean dsf;                        // == 1 if descending sequence
    {                                   // block for local variable scope
        int f = flfib(a.size());        // FIBTBL[f+1] > size >= FIBTBL[f]
        dsf = ((f%3) == 0);             // init compare flag
        if(FIBTBL[f] == a.size()){      // if exact fibonacci size,
            for (int i = 0; i < FIBTBL[f - 1]; i++) { //  move to b
                b.push(a.pop());
            }
        } else {                        // else move to b, c
            // update compare flag
            dsf ^= 1 == ((a.size() - FIBTBL[f]) & 1);
            // i = excess run count
            int i = a.size() - FIBTBL[f];
            // j = dummy run count
            int j = FIBTBL[f + 1] - a.size();
            // move excess elements to b
            do{
                b.push(a.pop());
            }while(0 != --i);
            // move dummy count elements to c
            do{
                c.push(a.pop());
            }while(0 != --j);
            csc = c.size();
        }
    }                                   // end block
    while(true){                        // setup to merge pair of runs
        if(asc == a.size()){            // check for size count change
            ars += scv;                 //   (due to dummy run size == 0)
            scv = 0-scv;
            asc = 0;
            csc = c.size();
        }
        if(bsc == b.size()){
            brs += scv;
            scv = 0-scv;
            bsc = 0;
            csc = c.size();
        }
        int arc = ars;                  // init run counters
        int brc = brs;
        while(true){                    // merging pair of runs
            if(dsf ^ (a.peek() <= b.peek())){
                c.push(a.pop());        // move a to c
                if(--arc != 0)          // if not end a
                    continue;           //   continue back to compare
                do{                     // else move rest of b run to c
                    c.push(b.pop());
                }while(0 != --brc);
                break;                  //   and break
            } else {
                c.push(b.pop());        // move b to c
                if(0 != --brc)          // if not end b
                    continue;           //   continue back to compare
                do{                     // else move rest of a run to c
                    c.push(a.pop());
                }while(0 != --arc);
                break;                  //   and break
            }
        }                               // end merging pair of runs
        dsf ^= true;                    // toggle compare flag
        if(b.empty()){                  // if end b
            if(a.empty())               //   if end a, done
                break;
            b.swap(c);                  //   swap b, c
            brs += ars;
            if (0 == asc)
                bsc = csc;
        } else {                        // else not end b
            if(!a.empty())              //   if not end a
                continue;               //     continue back to setup next merge
            a.swap(c);                  //   swap a, c
            ars += brs;
            if (0 == bsc)
                asc = csc;
        }
    }
    a.swap(c);                          // return sorted stack in a
}

If you don't have any extra information about the stack contents, then you pretty much are stuck just taking all the data out, sorting it, and putting it back in. Heapsort would be great here, as would quicksort or introsort.

  • 1
    If the idea is to write a C program during the interview, bubblesort would be a good choice. – Potatoswatter Jan 28 '11 at 8:50
  • @Potatoswatter- Can you elaborate on the rationale behind this? I'd figure that any of the other O(n^2) sorts are easier to write (insertion or selection, for example), and that an O(n lg n) sort like heapsort or mergesort would be comparably difficult. – templatetypedef Jan 28 '11 at 8:56

If there is no limitation on using other data structures, I would say the minimum heap. whenever popping a element from stack, put into the heap. When popping is done, taking element from the top of heap (minimum of the rest) and pushing it into the stack. Repeating such process until heap is empty.

For creating a heap, the average time is O(nlogn); for deleting elements from heap and putting elements back in ascending order, the average time is O(nlogn) too.

How does it look?

Note that Michael J. Barber's answer (see above) is not correct, which forgets to push element back to the stack when it is empty. Correct version is as follows:

void sort(stack s) {
    if (!IsEmpty(s)) {
        int x = Pop(s);
        sort(s);
        insert(s, x);
    }
}

void insert(stack s, int x) {
    if (!IsEmpty(s)) {  
        int y = Top(s);
        if (x < y) {
            Pop(s);
            insert(s, x);
            Push(s, y);
        } else {
            Push(s, x);
        }
    } else {
        Push(s, x); // !!! must step, otherwise, the stack will eventually be empty after sorting !!!
    }
}

Here is the solution in Javascript based on the answer given by @OrenD

var org = [4,67,2,9,5,11,3];
var helper = [];

while(org.length > 0){
    var temp = org.pop();
    while((helper.length > 0) && (helper[helper.length-1] < temp)){
        org.push(helper.pop());
    }
    helper.push(temp);
}

while(helper.length > 0){
    org.push(helper.pop());
}

Game of three stacks

With three stacks S (source stack, the stack with unsorted elements), A, B you can start playing a game similar to merge sort.

I think it is clear that if you have ordered elements on A and B (in the same direction, both ascending or both descending), that you can use S to merge sort A and B and then move the result to, for example, B.

The fact that you have some elements on A, B or S does not stop you from being able to use A, B or S for merging(, as long as you have the marker of the current size of A, B and S so you would not overshoot). If your procedure brings ordered elements on S, it is no brain to use A and B to remove the sorted portion to A or B in any direction you like: you can place it in reverse order to A or B directly, or, for example, place all elements to A and than reverse once again to B.

Assume that you have 4 sorted elements on A, 16 on B and some unsorted elements on S.

A.push(S.pop) and now create a 2-element sorted merge. Again B.push(S.pop) and create another one 2-element sorted merge. If the merges are not separated and/or not in the same direction, you can manipulate elements any way you like until you reach 4-element sorted merge on B (or even S). Now merge the initial 4-element sorted merge from A and that part on B, until you reach 8-element sorted merge.

You repeat everything until you create another 8-element sorted merge. You place it in right order on B (or S) and merge in order to get 16-element sorted merge. Now you place it on A (or S) and merge with 16-element merge that we've had on B all along.

The optimized implementation is tricky since you need to reduce moving (reverting) sorted merge from one stack to another. However if you fix and decide what for you are going to use A, B and S and force for example: A to contain the smaller and B larger merged portion in descending order then the algorithm is simpler.

The fact that you need to move some top elements from one stack to another is adding a constant factor to complexity, but it is never more than 2. Other than that the complexity is n*log(n) (you reach a 2n-element sorted merge by merging 2 n-element sorted merges, and a merging requires no more than 2n steps.)

Implementation in C# (other similar languages are obvious)

    void Stacking(Stack<int> sourceStack, Stack<int> mainStack, Stack<int> childStack, int n)
    {
        if (n == 0) return;

        if (n == 1)
        {
            mainStack.Push(sourceStack.Pop());
            return;
        }

        int mainSize = n/2;
        int childSize = n - n/2;

        Stacking(sourceStack, mainStack, childStack, mainSize);
        Stacking(sourceStack, childStack, mainStack, childSize);

        while (true)
        {
            while (mainSize > 0 && mainStack.Peek() >= childStack.Peek())
            {
                sourceStack.Push(mainStack.Pop());
                mainSize--;
            }

            if (mainSize == 0) break;

            while (childSize > 0 && childStack.Peek() >= mainStack.Peek())
            {
                sourceStack.Push(childStack.Pop());
                childSize--;
            }

            if (childSize == 0) break;
        }

        while (mainSize > 0)
        {
            sourceStack.Push(mainStack.Pop());
            mainSize--;
        }

        while (childSize > 0)
        {
            sourceStack.Push(childStack.Pop());
            childSize--;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            mainStack.Push(sourceStack.Pop());
    }

    void SortStack(Stack<int> sourceStack)
    {
        int n = sourceStack.Count();

        // possible optimization: if (n < 2) return;

        Stack<int> mainStack = new Stack<int>();
        Stack<int> childStack = new Stack<int>();

        Stacking(sourceStack, mainStack, childStack, n);

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            sourceStack.Push(mainStack.Pop());
    }

Game of log(n) stacks

The above procedure could be simplified if you are allowed to use at most log(n) stacks. This number of stacks does not mean that you will ever use an additional space larger than order of n. You simply mark stacks that will be used for merging 1, 2, 4... elements. In this case you do not care about the order since merging parts of 2^n will always be sorted in the same direction. However, this solution is only circumventing the fact that you are limited to use push and pop operation; other than that it is equivalent to merge sort in all aspects. In essence, if the number of stacks is not limited then you can easily emulate quick sort as well.

/* the basic idea is we go on
 *  popping one element (o) from the original stack (s) and we
 *  compare it with the new stack (temp)
 * if o (the popped element from original stack)
 *  is < the peek element from new stack temp
 * then we push the new stack element to original stack
 *  and recursively keep calling till temp is not empty
 *  and then push the element at the right place.
 * else we push the element to the new stack temp
 *  (o >= new temp stack.
 *
 * Entire logic is recursive.
 */

public void sortstk( Stack s )
{
    Stack<Integer> temp = new Stack<Integer>();

    while( !s.isEmpty() )
    {
        int s1 = (int) s.pop();

        while( !temp.isEmpty() && (temp.peek() > s1) )
        {
            s.push( temp.pop() );
        }
        temp.push( s1 );
    }

    // Print the entire sorted stack from temp stack
    for( int i = 0; i < temp.size(); i++ )
    {
        System.out.println( temp.elementAt( i ) );
    }
}

I think that the bubble sort could work on the stack with recursion.

   void sortStack(stack<int>& st){
        bool flag = true;
        int n = st.size();
        for(int i = 1; i <= n - 1 && flag; i++){
            flag = false;
            bubbleSortStack(st, flag, i);
        }
    }
    void bubbleSortStack(stack<int>& st, bool& flag, int endSize){
        if(st.size() == endSize)
            return;
        int val = st.top();
        st.pop();
        if(val > st.top()){
            flag = true;
            int tmp = st.top();
            st.push(val);
            val = tmp;
        }
        bubbleSortStack(st, flag);
        st.push(val);
    }

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