1

I created the following stored procedure in order to examine the isolation level behavior in transaction:

CREATE PROCEDURE ReadCommittedIsolationLevel
AS
BEGIN
    BEGIN TRANSACTION t1
    BEGIN TRY
        EXEC SnapShotIsolationLevel
        COMMIT TRANSACTION
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        PRINT ERROR_MESSAGE()
        ROLLBACK TRANSACTION t1
    END CATCH
END

CREATE PROCEDURE SnapShotIsolationLevel
AS
BEGIN
    SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL SNAPSHOT        
    BEGIN TRANSACTION t2
        BEGIN TRY
            SELECT TOP 20 * 
            FROM Orders 
            ORDER BY 1 DESC

            COMMIT
        END TRY
        BEGIN CATCH
            PRINT ERROR_MESSAGE()
            ROLLBACK TRAN t2
        END CATCH
END

And then I run this:

EXEC ReadCommittedIsolationLevel

I get this error:

Transaction failed in database 'MyDataBase' because the statement was run under snapshot isolation but the transaction did not start in snapshot isolation. You cannot change the isolation level of the transaction to snapshot after the transaction has started unless the transaction was originally started under snapshot isolation level.
Cannot roll back t2. No transaction or savepoint of that name was found.

If I remove the transactions and run it like plain stored procedures, it works fine.

Why is that?

  • Down voting without comment doesn't make sense.. – Offir Pe'er Feb 1 '18 at 11:42
4

The error gave you the correct explanation:

You cannot change the isolation level of the transaction to snapshot after the transaction has started.

SQL Server does not have nested transactions, the only real transaction you have is the outer transaction started under Read Committed, the next begin tran does nothing except for incrementing @@trancount. You can read more on it here: A SQL Server DBA myth a day: (26/30) nested transactions are real by Paul Randal

Snapshot Isolation means consistent data at the transaction level, not at the statement level(RCSI), so you should change Isolation level to Snapshot at the beginning of the transaction or you cannot change it to Snapshot at all.

  • When it's not wrapped in a transaction you can change TIL to Snapshot when you want just because there is no open transaction at all, so you cannot find you in situation "the transaction has started and someone tries to change TIL to Snapshot" – sepupic Jan 15 '18 at 14:02
  • The only obvious thing here is that you don't want to understand what does transaction level consistency mean. Read Committed allows non repeatable reads, so imagine you open tran at Read Committed, make a count() from tab, got 1000 rows, then change TIL to Snapshot and make a count() from tab again. Suppose that it's permitted. But between your first and second count 100 new rows were added to the tab. And you now have non repeatable read within your transaction, your reads are 1000 and 1100, there is NO transaction level consistency. – sepupic Jan 15 '18 at 14:54
  • (Continue) Transaction level consistency means that you can read from the same table many times during a transaction, the data will be the same. So If you FIRST set TIL SNAPSHOT and THEN begin your tran, your first read gives you 1000 rows, and your second read gives 1000 rows because you will receive the data at the moment of BEGIN TRAN, and that precise moment of BEGIN TRAN is memorized ONLY if you are operating in SNAPSHOT TIL. In your case when your transaction is started BEFORE you changed to SNAPSHOT, no begin tran moment was memorized – sepupic Jan 15 '18 at 15:02

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