2

I have a struct instance which is passed to a TCP/IP client via a Boost interprocess, in the client I need to serialise it using the Boost serialise library. As this struct contains boost::interprocess basic_string's it can't serialise directly so I'm working around this by using them to construct std::string's in the serialize function.

using CharAllocator = boost::interprocess::allocator<char, boost::interprocess::managed_shared_memory::segment_manager>;
using MyShmString = boost::interprocess::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, CharAllocator>;

MyShmString uuid_;


template<typename _Archive>
void save( _Archive &ar, unsigned int const version ) const
{
    ar << std::string{ this->uuid_.c_str(), this->uuid_.length() };
}

template<typename _Archive>
void load( _Archive &ar, unsigned int const version )
{
    auto tmp = std::string{};
    ar >> tmp; this->uuid_ = tmp.c_str();
}

Is there a better way to do this without the constructor overhead?

  • Pse show how it is "passed to a TCP/IP client". – rustyx Jan 15 '18 at 14:17
  • @RustyX I would but that's so much code and all it is is an interprocess deque – Treebeard Jan 15 '18 at 15:32
2

For std::string including

#include <boost/serialization/string.hpp>

does the trick. To be honest, I'm a little surprised that they didn't add boost::container::basic_string<> support - apparently that's an open issue for YEARS: https://svn.boost.org/trac10/ticket/8174

So, I guess you'd do it manually for now.

Your "crutches" solution would be the quickest win. And honestly I wouldn't invest more time, unless I knew exactly what scenario you are facing.

Note One important realization is that std::string is (correctly) marked "primitive type" for boost serialization, and this prevent head-aches that you'd have due to object tracking of the temporary string objects. Be sure to include the header above to guarantee the correct behaviour.

At this point it's a little weird to me that you're both using shared memory and serialization at the same time. Most likely you can exploit the shared memory buffer characteristics directly - see e.g. http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_66_0/doc/html/interprocess/managed_memory_segments.html#interprocess.managed_memory_segments.managed_heap_memory_external_buffer).

  • Serialisation lib with STL containers is great that's why I went with it. Found the solution now (seems to be working and posted below). I'll have a look at the managed externals, sounds like might be good way to go. Cheers – Treebeard Jan 15 '18 at 17:41
1

For anyone who wants it I found the answer by going through the boost::interprocess library source code for serialising a std::vector, it's a little different from what you may need as I'm using 1.65 so 'boost::serialization::stl::load_collection' is deprecated.

If there's a better way to do this please post though.

template<typename _Archive, typename _T1, typename _T2, typename _Alloc>
inline void save( _Archive &ar, boost::interprocess::basic_string<_T1, _T2, _Alloc> const str, unsigned int const version )
{
    boost::serialization::stl::save_collection<
        _Archive,
        boost::interprocess::basic_string<_T1, _T2, _Alloc>>( ar, str );
}


template<typename _Archive, typename _T1, typename _T2, typename _Alloc>
inline void load( _Archive &ar, boost::interprocess::basic_string<_T1, _T2, _Alloc> &str, unsigned int const version )
{
    boost::archive::library_version_type const library_version{
        ar.get_library_version()
    };

    boost::serialization::item_version_type item_version{ 0 };
    boost::serialization::collection_size_type count;
    ar >> BOOST_SERIALIZATION_NVP( count );

    if ( boost::archive::library_version_type( 3 ) < library_version )
    {
        ar >> BOOST_SERIALIZATION_NVP( item_version );
    }

    str.reserve( count );
    boost::serialization::stl::collection_load_impl( ar, str, count, item_version );
}


template<typename _Archive, typename _T1, typename _T2, typename _Alloc>
inline void serialize( _Archive &ar, boost::interprocess::basic_string<_T1, _T2, _Alloc> &str, unsigned int const version )
{
    boost::serialization::split_member( ar, str, version );
}

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