11

Say that I have a situation like this:

ITest = interface
 procedure somethingHere();
end;

TImpl = class(TInterfacedObject, ITest)
 procedure somethingHere();
end;

TImplSub = class(TImpl)

end;

Given the code above I am able to use this kind of code without any memory leak if I don't use the try-finally statement:

var a: ITest;
begin
 a := TImpl.Create;
end;

Is this the same for the subclass?

var a: ITest;
begin
 a := TImplSub.Create;
end;

I think that since TImplSub is a subclass of TImpl, TImplSub inherits TInterfacedObject and ITest from the father. Does the above code leak?

This may be not related but how can I check if the code above leaks or not?

  • 1
    Testing should be easy, ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown set True will enable a simple report when your program terminates. – nil Jan 15 '18 at 21:25
  • @nil setting ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown in the onCreate of the form? – Rosanna Trevisan Jan 15 '18 at 21:27
  • I guess it is not important when set - at least when done early enough. I personally would set it in the dpr file, as I am used to look there. – nil Jan 15 '18 at 21:38
  • What try-finally? – Sertac Akyuz Jan 15 '18 at 21:40
  • @SertacAkyuz a := TImpl.Create; is not protected by the try finally I meant that – Rosanna Trevisan Jan 15 '18 at 22:02
13

Reference counting for interface references is triggered with _AddRef and _Release methods that are in this case implemented in TInterfacedObject. Your subclass inherits that reference counting behavior.

You can use, actually you must use, interface references to store your subclassed object instance, the way you coded it. (Not using interface reference for storing reference counted object instances breaks reference counting mechanism)

Following code does not leak, and does not require try...finally block because destruction is automatic.

var a: ITest;
begin
 a := TImplSub.Create;
end;

To check for memory leaks under Windows compiler you can use ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown

begin
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown := true;
  ...
end.

Another way of testing whether object is destroyed while you are investigating specific behavior is to override destructor and set breakpoint there.

  • Hey Dalija I cannot upvote but I came to your conclusion. Thank you!! – Rosanna Trevisan Jan 15 '18 at 22:11
  • 1
    @Rosanna, now you can ;-) – Victoria Jan 15 '18 at 22:13
  • 3
    Just for the record using ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown:=DebugHook<>0; is more common way of using ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown I tried to simplify it :) – Dalija Prasnikar Jan 15 '18 at 22:17
5

Thanks to the comments (@nil user) I have managed to make a test like this

type
 ITest = interface
   procedure test;
 end;

 TProva = class(TInterfacedObject, ITest)
   procedure test;
 end;

 TProvaSub = class(TProva)
   procedure testDue;
 end;

And then if you try to run this code (in debug mode with F9):

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var a: ITest;
begin    
 a := TProvaSub.Create;
 a.test;    
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  ReportMemoryLeaksOnShutdown:=DebugHook<>0;
end;

WHen I close the form I DON'T have a leak report.


My conclusion: TProvaSub has a piece of TProva inside itself (since it's a subclass) and so it inherits the _AddRef and _Release. So the code is good and doesn't leak!

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