3

In Data.List module there's inits function that turns for example, [1,2,3,4] -> [[],[1],[1,2],[1,2,3],[1,2,3,4]]

I'm trying to define similar function using recursion, however I can't think of a way doing in correct order. The closest I have gotten is the list backwards, result = [[],[4],[3,4],[2,3,4],[1,2,3,4]]:

inits' :: [Int] -> [[Int]]
inits' [] = [[]]
inits' (x:xs) = inits' xs ++ [(x:xs)]

I'm not exactly sure how I could create a list by appending one element at time in the correct order? Could someone point in right direction, or is it not possible to do via recursion?

  • Hint: you can use difference lists. – Willem Van Onsem Jan 16 '18 at 14:12
  • @WillemVanOnsem, that's a pretty good approach most of the time, but to get optimal performance even in weird cases, it's better to use a proper queue. – dfeuer Jan 16 '18 at 14:28
  • In particular, forcing the entire result should be O(n^2), but reaching any element of any result list should ideally be O(i+k) (i.e., the distance to that element). Accomplishing both of those simultaneously seems to require a persistent queue. – dfeuer Jan 16 '18 at 15:27
  • 1
    This question seems to address an efficient version of inits. – RoadRunner Jan 16 '18 at 16:32
  • 1
    On the other hand, I forgot the simple way to be optimal (big-O, but with mediocre constant factors): use take. But that may not be "recursive" enough for this question. – dfeuer Jan 16 '18 at 23:10
3

We can prepend the data of all the remaining inits, like for example:

inits' :: [a] -> [[a]]
inits' [] = [[]]
inits' (x:xs) = [] : map (x:) (inits' xs)

As a basecase we return a singleton list with an empty list when the input is an empty list.

In the recursive case, we first yield the empty list, followed by the inits' of the tail of the list, but all these elements are prepended with x (with map (x:)).

Then we have:

Prelude> inits' [1,4,2,5]
[[],[1],[1,4],[1,4,2],[1,4,2,5]]

Since (not in evaluation order):

   inits' [1,4,2,5]
-> [] : map (1:) (inits' [4,2,5])
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) (inits' [2,5]))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : map (2:) (inits' [5])))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : map (2:) ([] : map (5:) (inits' []))))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : map (2:) ([] : map (5:) [[]])))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : map (2:) ([] : [[5]])))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : map (2:) [[],[5]]))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) ([] : [[2],[2,5]]))
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : map (4:) [[],[2],[2,5]])
-> [] : map (1:) ([] : [[4],[4,2],[4,2,5]])
-> [] : map (1:) [[],[4],[4,2],[4,2,5]]
-> [] : [[1],[1,4],[1,4,2],[1,4,2,5]]
-> [[],[1],[1,4],[1,4,2],[1,4,2,5]]
  • this definition looks exactly equivalent to the "horrifyingly inefficient" one from ghc 7.8.3. quick testing head $ inits' [1..] !! n at the ghci prompt, interpreted, indeed reveals ~n^2 empirical orders of growth. – Will Ness Jan 17 '18 at 8:39
4

The easiest thing to try for such a function is just looking at the desired result and “reverse-pattern-matching” on the RHS of the function equation.

You already have that with

inits' [] = [[]]

Now with inits (x:xs), for example inits (1:[2,3,4]), you know that the result should be [[],[1],[1,2],[1,2,3],[1,2,3,4]], which matches the pattern []:_. So

inits' (x:xs) = [] : _

Now, the simplest recursion would be to just call inits' again on xs, like

inits' (x:xs) = [] : inits' xs

however, that doesn't give the correct result: assuming the recursive call works correctly, you have

inits' (1:[2,3,4]) = [] : [[],[2],[2,3],[2,3,4]]
                   = [[],[],[2],[2,3],[2,3,4]]

The 1 is completely missing, obviously, because we didn't actually use it in the definition. We need to use it, in fact it should be prepended before all of the list-chunks in the recursive result. You can do that with map.

3

I think you should change your function definition from:

inits' :: [Int] -> [[Int]]

to:

inits' :: [a] -> [[a]]

Since inits from Data.List is of type [a] -> [[a]], and it doesn't care whats actually in the list. It needs to be polymorphic and accept a list of any type.

Furthermore, since others have shown the most straightforward recursive approach, you can also use foldr here.

Here is the base code:

inits' :: [a] -> [[a]]
inits' = foldr (\x acc -> [] : (map (x:) acc)) [[]]

Where [[]] is the base case, just like in your function. For the actual recursive part, here is how it works with the call inits' [1, 2, 3, 4]:

  • Starts folding from the right at value 4, and creates [[], [4]]
  • Now on value 3, and creates [[], [3], [3, 4]
  • Now on value 2, and creates [[], [2], [2, 3], [2, 3, 4]]
  • Now on value 1, and creates [[], [1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4]]

Which gives the final nested list required, similarily to the function call:

*Main> inits' [1,2,3,4]
[[],[1],[1,2],[1,2,3],[1,2,3,4]]

From the behavior described above, you just need to focus on [] : (map (x:) acc), where you map the current value x being folded into your accumulated list acc, while also prepending an empty list on each fold.

If you still have trouble understanding foldr, you can look at this minimal example of how the folding performs from the right:

foldr f x [a, b, c] = a `f` (b `f` (c `f` x))

and How does foldr work?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.