server-udp.pl

my $socket = IO::Socket::Async.bind-udp('localhost', 3333);
react {
    whenever $socket.Supply -> $v {
        if $v.chars > 0 {
            $v.print;
        }
    }
}

client-udp.pl

my $socket = IO::Socket::Async.udp();
await $socket.print-to('localhost', 3333, "\nHello, Perl 6!");

How can the client read the servers response?
Perhaps this is not yet implemented?

For example in Perl 5:

client.pl

...
my $data_send = "Test 1234567890";
$client_socket->send( $data_send )
    or die "Client error while sending: $!\n";

# read operation
$client_socket->recv( my $data_rcv , 1024 )
    or die "Client error while received: $!\n";

print "Received data: $data_rcv\n";
...
  • I'm studying perl 6. I'm curious how to do this. In Perl 5 and Python 3, I can get a response from the server. – Shniperson Jan 16 at 15:49
  • I don't see any obvious way to query for the address/port of the UDP sender. The Supply just sends through the message itself. Would be pretty cool for it to mixin a role with a peer-host() and peer-port() though... – Curt Tilmes Jan 17 at 2:26
  • Previous comment was about the server side. I also don't see an obvious way for the client to listen on the same port it just send the UDP packet out on that would let it receive a response. – Curt Tilmes Jan 17 at 2:28
  • On its way: github.com/rakudo/rakudo/pull/1473. Thanks Timo! – Curt Tilmes Feb 3 at 14:27

First let me reiterate my comment above. From reading the documentation for IO::Socket::Async, I don't see an obvious way to do this. You can either set up a UDP sender, or a UDP receiver, but not both.

UDP connections are defined by 4 things, (sender address, sender port, receiver address, receiver port).

A server can listen on a given address/port. Once a packet has been received, there are usually ways to query for the sender's address/port. That's what I don't see for Perl 6.

A client can direct a packet to a specific server address/port. The client usually picks a random 'sender port', giving the fourth element needed for a 'connection' (in this connection-less protocol).

So, as in your examples from other languages, the client sends the packet, the server looks up the sender's address/port, then returns a packet to that same address/port. The client, after sending off its packet, listens again to the same random port it sent the packet out on, to receive the response from the server. I don't see an obvious way in Perl 6 to follow up a print-to with a recv on the same port just sent to.

With that said, Perl 6 has a fantastic NativeCall facility that can be used to call dynamic libraries directly, so you can do everything you need with the actual system calls if you are so inclined.

This isn't the 'official' Perl 6 way by any means, and once IO::Socket::Async can do what you want, purge all this from your brain, but here's how to do it with NativeCall:

server-udp.pl

use NativeCall;

constant \AF_INET := 2;
constant \SOCK_DGRAM := 2;

class sockaddr_in is repr('CStruct')
{
    has int16 $.sin_family;
    has uint16 $.sin_port;
    has int32 $.sin_addr;
    has int64 $.pad;
}

sub socket(int32, int32, int32 --> int32) is native() {}
sub bind(int32, sockaddr_in, uint32 --> int32) is native() {}
sub htons(uint16 --> uint16) is native() {}
sub ntohs(uint16 --> uint16) is native() {}
sub inet_ntoa(int32 --> Str) is native() {}
sub perror(Str) is native() {}
sub recvfrom(int32, Blob, size_t, int32, sockaddr_in, int32 is rw --> ssize_t) is native() {}
sub sendto(int32, Blob, size_t, int32, sockaddr_in, int32 --> ssize_t) is native() {}

my int32 $sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
perror('socket') // die if $sock < 0;

my $addr = sockaddr_in.new(sin_family => AF_INET,
                           sin_port => htons(3333),
                           sin_addr => 0);

my $ret = bind($sock, $addr, nativesizeof(sockaddr_in));

perror('bind') // die if $ret < 0;

my $buf = buf8.allocate(1024);

my $fromaddr = sockaddr_in.new;

my int32 $addrsize = nativesizeof(sockaddr_in);

loop
{
    $ret = recvfrom($sock, $buf, $buf.bytes, 0, $fromaddr, $addrsize);
    perror('recvfrom') // die if $ret < 0;

    my $msg = $buf.decode;
    $msg.print;

    my $return-msg = "Thank you for saying $msg";
    my $return-buf = $return-msg.encode;

    $ret = sendto($sock, $return-buf, $return-buf.bytes, 0, $fromaddr, $addrsize);
    perror('sendto') // die if $ret < 0;
}

client-udp.pl

use NativeCall;

constant \AF_INET := 2;
constant \SOCK_DGRAM := 2;

class sockaddr_in is repr('CStruct')
{
    has int16 $.sin_family;
    has uint16 $.sin_port;
    has int32 $.sin_addr;
    has int64 $.pad;
}

sub socket(int32, int32, int32 --> int32) is native() {}
sub htons(uint16 --> uint16) is native() {}
sub inet_ntoa(int32 --> Str) is native() {}
sub inet_aton(Str, int32 is rw --> int32) is native() {}
sub perror(Str) is native() {}
sub recvfrom(int32, Blob, size_t, int32, sockaddr_in, int32 is rw --> ssize_t) is native() {}
sub recv(int32, Blob, size_t, int32 --> ssize_t) is native() {}
sub sendto(int32, Blob, size_t, int32, sockaddr_in, int32 --> ssize_t) is native() {}

my int32 $sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
perror('socket') // die if $sock < 0;

my int32 $addr-ip;
inet_aton('127.0.0.1', $addr-ip) or die "Bad address";

my $addr = sockaddr_in.new(sin_family => AF_INET,
                           sin_port => htons(3333),
                           sin_addr => $addr-ip);

my $msg = "Hello, Perl 6!\n".encode;

my $ret = sendto($sock, $msg, $msg.bytes, 0, $addr, nativesizeof(sockaddr_in));
perror('sendto') // die if $ret < 0;

my $buf = buf8.allocate(1024);

$ret = recv($sock, $buf, $buf.bytes, 0);

say "Return Msg: ", $buf.decode;
  • NB: All of this is very OS and architecture dependent. You may need to tweak for your situation. – Curt Tilmes Jan 17 at 3:59
  • What do you think of using one of the Inlines with an appropriate module? I posted a comment earlier that linked to this comment. I deleted it because using P5 means bringing in a major dependency and it's "cheating". But being practical, isn't P5 often available and have a higher level and more portable API than using the underlying C libs? I'd enjoy reading commentary here or in your answer about using an Inline for this. – raiph Jan 17 at 4:55
  • I thank everyone for the comments! your comments are very interesting to me. in the first post I wrote that perhaps it is not yet implemented. very sorry, but I hope that in the future it will do, perhaps even thanks to this topic. – Shniperson Jan 17 at 9:39

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