What would be the equivalent of that code in kotlin, nothing seems to work of what I try:

public interface AnInterface {
    void doSmth(MyClass inst, int num);
}

init:

AnInterface impl = (inst, num) -> {
    //...
}
up vote 9 down vote accepted

If AnInterface is Java, you can work with SAM conversion:

val impl = AnInterface { inst, num -> 
     //...
}

Otherwise, if the interface is Kotlin...

interface AnInterface {
     fun doSmth(inst: MyClass, num: Int)
}

...you can use the object syntax for implementing it anonymously:

val impl = object : AnInterface {
    override fun doSmth(inst:, num: Int) {
        //...
    }
}

If you're rewriting both the interface and its implementations to Kotlin, then you should just delete the interface and use a functional type:

val impl: (MyClass, Int) -> Unit = { inst, num -> ... }
  • This is the true answer... the other 2 does not address the lambda implementation. However if I still want to use my own declared interface (for readability reason), does it mean I cannot use lambda? – Sira Lam May 23 at 1:36
  • 1
    @SiraLam you can declare a default variable name for a functional type: val listener: (name: Class, other: OtherClass) -> Unit – TheWanderer Jun 18 at 3:32
  • 1
    @SiraLam If you want the interface for readability reasons then you're probably suffering from Primitive Obsession. tl;dr - don't use primitives as arguments. What does a function with this signature do? (String) -> String Without a name, you can't reason about it. Now, what does a function with this signature do? (UserId) -> PhoneNumber - Well, the only reasonable implementation would be something that looks up user data by ID, then pulls out the phone number and returns it. If your functions don't take primitives then you don't usually need to wrap them in an interface for readability. – Matt Klein Jul 11 at 21:38

You can use an object expression

So it would look something like this:

val impl = object : AnInterface {
    override fun(doSmth: Any, num: Int) {
        TODO()
    }
}

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