2

I have the code working in .Net framework 4.5 but when i try to code the same in .Net framework 2.0, it gives compilation error

'System.Security.Cryptography.Rfc2898DeriveBytes': type used in a using statement must be implicitly convertible to System.IDisposable

How to fix it?

CODE

[ComVisible(true)]
    public string HashPassword(string password)
    {

        byte[] salt;
        byte[] subkey;
        using (var deriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, SaltSize, PBKDF2IterCount))
        {
            salt = deriveBytes.Salt;
            subkey = deriveBytes.GetBytes(PBKDF2SubkeyLength);
        }

        var outputBytes = new byte[1 + SaltSize + PBKDF2SubkeyLength];
        //some more code goes here
        return Convert.ToBase64String(outputBytes);
    }
  • The error says that you can only initialize an instance of a class which is inherited from IDispossble interface and Rfc2898DeriveBytes class does not inherit IDisposable interface. That's why you are seeing this error – Chetan Ranpariya Jan 16 '18 at 23:40
  • 1
    @ChetanRanpariya That's not correct. It inherits from DeriveBytes, which does implement the IDisposable interface. – André B Jan 16 '18 at 23:41
  • 1
    Taking a look into the documentation, it is not clear whether the IDisposable interface was implemented by the abstract DeriveBytes class back in .NET Framework 2.0... – André B Jan 16 '18 at 23:45
  • @Samra Check if your deriveBytes variable has access to the Dispose method.. does Intellisense approve deriveBytes.Dispose() ? – André B Jan 16 '18 at 23:48
  • 2
    DeriveBytes does not implement IDisposable in .net 2.0. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Chetan Ranpariya Jan 16 '18 at 23:54
0

How about if you remove the using like:

 Rfc2898DeriveBytes deriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(password, SaltSize, 
 PBKDF2IterCount);
 salt = deriveBytes.Salt;
 subkey = deriveBytes.GetBytes(PBKDF2SubkeyLength);
  • yup that's what i asked Lachlan in comments and did! :) – Samra Jan 17 '18 at 0:37
1

Taking inspiration from André's comment, it would appear that the Dispose method wasn't introduced until .NET 4: DeriveBytes.Dispose (note: "Other Versions")

You could take a look at how the Dispose method is implemented in the current framework and consider adapating it to your project: Source Browser

  • Thanks Lachlan I have removed the using statement. Would that be alright or is there any better approach? – Samra Jan 17 '18 at 0:14

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