2

This is the code I tested.

    (function() {
        var i, x;
    
        console.time('a');
        for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x++) {
            if (x > 1000) {
                i++;
                x = 0;
            }
        }
        console.timeEnd('a');
    
        console.time('b');
        for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x += 0.001) {
            if (x > 1) {
                i++;
                x = 0;
            }
        }
        console.timeEnd('b');
    })();
        
    var i, x;
    
    console.time('c');
    for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x++) {
        if (x > 1000) {
            i++;
            x = 0;
        }
    }
    console.timeEnd('c');
    
    console.time('d');
    for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x += 0.001) {
        if (x > 1) {
            i++;
            x = 0;
        }
    }
    console.timeEnd('d');

The result of this is as follows. a is 1200 ms. b is 1200 ms. c is 2300 ms. d is 23000 ms.

a and b have no difference in operation speed. (Even if you increase the number of operations)

but..

The operation speed of c and d is 10 times different!!!

(a and c), (b and d) are each other the same code.

The differences are that a and b refer to local variables, and c and d refer to global variables.

Therefore, the speed difference according to the search range can be understood.

(That a is faster than c because the search range is narrower!)

But I can not understand the difference in the operation speed of 'integer versus decimal'.

It`s why~?

Why 'a vs b' has no speed difference, Does 'c vs d' differ in speed?

This problem makes me too tired. Please help me. T^T

I did a lot of searching to solve this problem, but I could not solve it. The link below is one of the many answers I've looked at.

Why is accessing a variable using window.variable slower?

  • Are your results consistent between different browsers? – PM 77-1 Jan 17 '18 at 16:07
  • There are no true integers in JavaScript. It's all float. JS primitive operator << and >> converts the float to an integer, then shifts, then converts the result back to a float. Thus these operations use more time than doing arithmetic and Math.floor which doesn't do the conversion to and from. Also note that 0.001 is not possible to represent exact in float. – Sylwester Jan 17 '18 at 16:07
  • If you add speed measurements, please don't forget to say in which browser on which system. (Fwiw, I can reproduce on Chrome/59.0.3071.90 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64): a: 2500ms, b: 2060ms, c: 3710ms, d: 26600ms) – Bergi Jan 17 '18 at 16:09
  • 1
    @Sylwester JS engines do use integers internally whenever they can – Bergi Jan 17 '18 at 16:10
  • Similar results are seen in Fireworks. Edge was too slow .... I gave up. – msm082919 Jan 17 '18 at 16:16
0

An answer was deleted by its author, and so my comments. So here is what I found:

Edit

I corrected my stupidity (I hope. @Bergi will keep me straight). Reworked the experiment, w/ revised comments below. Scope seems to be the issue. Running with globally scoped variables is slower, running with locally scoped variables is faster.

end Edit

I believe the issue is about resolving variables in global scope and/or the scope hierarchy generally.

Experiments:

  • In the IIFE ("a" & "b") comment out var i,x declaration
  • Turned "d" into a constructor function. Instantiated a new object.

Results in Chrome:

  • "a" seems to run about 50% slower.
  • b" runs as slow as the original "d"
  • As an object "d" runs much faster, 5-8x, ballpark.

Notes:

  • relative results are more dramatic in Chrome vs. SO snippet runner

  • Original "d" & object "d" run virtually the same in SO snippet runner. Interesting.

    (function() {
       // var i, x;
    
        console.time('a');
        for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x++) {
            if (x > 1000) {
                i++;
                x = 0;
            }
        }
        console.timeEnd('a');
    
        console.time('b');
        for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x += 0.001) {
            if (x > 1) {
                i++;
                x = 0;
            }
        }
        console.timeEnd('b');
    })();
        
    var i, x;
    
    console.time('c');
    for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x++) {
        if (x > 1000) {
            i++;
            x = 0;
        }
    }
    console.timeEnd('c');
   
console.time('d');
for (i = x = 0; i < 1000000; x += 0.001) {
    if (x > 1) {
        i++;
        x = 0;
    }
}
console.timeEnd('d');     

function sloePoke() {
    this.q,
    this.r,
    this.go = function() {
    console.time('d');
    for (this.q = this.r = 0; this.q < 1000000; this.r += 0.001) {
        if (this.r > 1) {
            this.q++;
            this.r = 0;
        }
    }
    console.timeEnd('d');
    }
   }

var sloth = new sloePoke();
sloth.go();

  • You forgot to declare var q, r somewhere, and you didn't change x = 0 into r = 0 in case d - not resetting r of course speeds up the runtime by factor 1000. – Bergi Jan 17 '18 at 17:34
  • "very common and probably in many places in the JS of any given browser session." - no. Variables are managed per browsing context (page in window/tab), not per session. Only the code on that particular page matters. – Bergi Jan 17 '18 at 17:35
0

Hard to be sure of the exact reason, but a few things can be observed.

First, for the examples in the scope, the x is probably discarded, making this calculation at least, non signifiant. It's easy on optimization to see that the x won't be used ever, hence, no need to evaluate it.

As for the second example, the decimal vs integer isn't causing the difference. You can try using x+=7 for example and you'll have a comparable delay.

console.time('d');
for (i = 0, x = 0; i < 1000000000; x+=7 ) {
   
        i++;
       
};
console.timeEnd('d')

Same thing if the initial x value is higher:

console.time('d');
for (i = 0, x = 10000000000; i < 1000000000; x+=1 ) {
   
        i++;
       
};
console.timeEnd('d')

Playing with the numbers, we can try to find the tipping point. Let's use Math.pow to try to find where the time changes. You'll find that it changes drastically between Math.pow(2, 30) and Math.pow(2, 31). Try:

console.time('c');
for (i = 0, x = Math.pow(2, 30); i < 1000000000; x+=1 ) {
   
        i++;
       
};
console.timeEnd('c');

console.time('d');
for (i = 0, x = Math.pow(2, 31); i < 1000000000; x+=1 ) {
   
        i++;
       
};console.timeEnd('d')

So, from this, the difference could maybe be explained by the difference between single-precision format vs double-precision format. Math.pow(2, 31) is the limit for single precision format (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-precision_floating-point_format). While in javascript Numbers are considered double, there's nothing to say that the engine doesn't optimize so as to use single-precision when possible. It's good to see also, what happens when you add 0.001 to itself. Pretty soon it gives something that needs double precision. See:

console.log(0.001 + 0.001 + 0.001 + 0.001 +0.001 + 0.001 + 0.001 + 0.001+0.001 + 0.001 + 0.001)

Again, hard to say this is the exact cause, but one way to push this reasoning would be to start x from Math.pow(2, 31) - 1000000000 (which means you'd stay the whole time in single preicison) and increment and see how the time evolves. Let's increment by 10000000 so as to have something signifiant. This gives me this table:

x starts at 1147483648: 2861s
x starts at 1157483648: 3100s
x starts at 1167483648: 3537s
x starts at 1177483648: 3366s
x starts at 1187483648: 3656s
x starts at 1197483648: 3916s
x starts at 1207483648: 4257s
x starts at 1217483648: 4537s
x starts at 1227483648: 4587s
x starts at 1237483648: 4798s
x starts at 1247483648: 4910s
x starts at 1257483648  5200s
x starts at 1267483648: 5364s

Which seems to increase more or less linearly. If you try decrementing, you'll see the time doesn't change (of course it depends on other things as well, but as a general rule this is at least the results I have).

So based on this, the difference in time in your examples seems to be based on the javascript engine using single-precision when possible, which accelerates the calculations.

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