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I am currently using this example to connect to SQL Server using Go:

Create Go apps

Here is the example I am using:

    package main

    import (
        _ "github.com/denisenkom/go-mssqldb"
        "database/sql"
        "context"
        "log"
        "fmt"
    )

    // Replace with your own connection parameters
    var server = "localhost"
    var port = 1433
    var user = "sa"
    var password = "your_password"

    var db *sql.DB

    func main() {
        var err error

        // Create connection string
        connString := fmt.Sprintf("server=%s;user id=%s;password=%s;port=%d",
            server, user, password, port)

        // Create connection pool
        db, err = sql.Open("sqlserver", connString)
        if err != nil {
            log.Fatal("Error creating connection pool: " + err.Error())
        }
        log.Printf("Connected!\n")

        // Close the database connection pool after program executes
        defer db.Close()

        SelectVersion()
    }

Is there any known way to use Windows Authentication to connect to SQL Server? I have tried adding "Trusted_Connection=yes" and removing the username/password.

I have Googled around but have not found any Go Packages that have this option.

  • normally you don't connect as a domain user over a script but as a sql user only with limited access of course not SA. – maSTAShuFu Jan 17 '18 at 21:24
  • 2
    Oh I just figured it out. "trusted_connection=yes" did work. I just entered it wrong. – Kade Williams Jan 17 '18 at 21:25
  • @KadeWilliams You cannot use trusted auth when you are connected via TCP, you need to make the connection over a named pipe. Try removing the port from the connection string. If that doesn't work, try server: np:%s to force a named pipe connection – Bob Vale Jan 17 '18 at 21:29
  • @KadeWilliams so please answer your own question and then mark it as accepted. – kostix Jan 18 '18 at 10:15
  • @BobVale, that's incorrect: it's perfectly possible to use trusted authentication over TCP—the MS-TDS protocol uses SSPI in its handshake, which is basically a challenge/response protocol (SPNEGO). – kostix Jan 18 '18 at 10:17
1

As I posted earlier...

"trusted_connection=yes" did work. I just entered it wrong.

  • Does not work for me. I'm using it like: connString := fmt.Sprintf("server=%s;port=%d;trusted_connection=yes;", server, port) – Gaurav Gahlot Nov 16 '18 at 4:07
0

Your client side setup was correct. Did you add the windows user account to to the Database? I have done this multiple time without issues. Make sure your windows auth is enabled in your Db and the user has sufficient previlages.

steps to connect to sql server using windows authenticaton

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