1

I have a function foo() that acquires a critical section does some processing and releases the critical section.Now there are multiple control flows so in order to avoid remembering to release the lock i thought of wrapping it up in a class, so that the destructor would automatically free the lock.

class Lock
{
public:
    LPCRITICAL_SECTION m_a;
    Lock(CRITICAL_SECTION *a):m_a(a){EnterCriticalSection(a);}
    ~Lock(){LeaveCriticalSection(m_a);}
};

Now the problem is that i have control flows where i want to acquire the lock, do something and then free it, and then continue other processing.So i don't want to wait to free the lock till function ends when the destruction would kick in.Is there a way to achieve this.

  • The instance if the lock needs to be shared between different threads. How are you going to achieve that? – David Heffernan Jan 18 '18 at 5:03
  • @DavidHeffernan The critical section needs to be shared between threads, but the Lock must not. Sharing the Lock between threads defeats the purpose (and runs afoul of the rule that the thread which enters a critical section is the only one that can leave it). – Raymond Chen Jan 18 '18 at 5:23
  • OK, I see now. I didn't read the code closely enough. I started with Barmar's original answer which create an instance of the lock without passing in a critical section. Should have checked the code in the Q. – David Heffernan Jan 18 '18 at 5:35
5

Use a local block:

void myFunction() {
    // do stuff
    {
        Lock l(&critsec);
        // do stuff needing lock
    }
    // do more stuff
}
  • Yes it is this easy. Do use local blocks for critical sections. Don't hide release of critical sections in class destructors. – Justin Randall Jan 18 '18 at 4:31
  • @JustinRandall "Don't hide release of critical sections in class destructors" - why not? That is the very premise of RAII programming, and is essential to C++ OOP design and the STL library. Acquiring the critical section lock in the constructor and releasing it in the destructor is exactly what should happen – Remy Lebeau Jan 18 '18 at 15:12
  • @RemyLebeau because of exactly the OPs problem "i have control flows where i want to acquire the lock, do something and then free it, and then continue other processing.So i don't want to wait to free the lock till function ends when the destruction would kick in" – Justin Randall Jan 18 '18 at 16:32
  • @JustinRandall But we're still hiding the release in the destructor, just solving the problem of waiting for the function to end to run it. – Barmar Jan 18 '18 at 18:08
  • @JustinRandall the OP's problem was due to a lack of knowledge about nested scopes. Using a destructor is the correct solution, just use a nested scope to make the destructor run earlier than function exit. – Remy Lebeau Jan 19 '18 at 4:03

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