2

I've searched around and seen similar discussions in previous posts, but the question has never been answered to my satisfaction. Essentially, I'm looking for a quick, elegant and simple way in PHP to ask the question 'Does this exist, and if it does, does it have a non-zero, non-null value?' that does not throw a notice in "property of non-object" scenarios or undefined variables.

Here's the scenario and a couple of versions that I've tested:

// Setting up
$a = ['key' => 'value', 'otherKey' => 'otherValue', 'sub' => ['key' => 'value']];
$b = 0;
$c = 123;
$d = 'string';
$e = (object) $a;

// my tests:
!! $b 
=> false
!! $c
=> true
!! $a['key']
=> true
!! $a['notExist']
=> PHP Notice:  Trying to get property of non-object on line 1
!! $e->key
=> true
!! $e->notExist
=> PHP Notice:  Trying to get property of non-object on line 1
!! $f
=> PHP Notice:  Trying to get property of undefined variable on line 1

I've done the same with isset(), empty() and all kinds of things. I've managed to build a somewhat workable version of the thing I'm trying to do by building a function that checks types, traverses namespaces and does all kinds of voodoo to the argument you're throwing at it, but it feels like it shouldn't have to be that complicated.

Is there really no better way to ask "Does this exist and is it set to a non-zero, non-null value?"

  • 3
    Can u explain why empty isn't enough here?: A variable is considered empty if it does not exist or if its value equals FALSE. empty() does not generate a warning if the variable does not exist." and from Booleans: When converting to boolean, the following values are considered FALSE: "[...]the integer 0 (zero); the float 0.0 (zero); the empty string, and the string "0"; an array with zero elements; the special type NULL (including unset variables) [...]". Shouldn't !empty work? – FirstOne Jan 18 '18 at 17:22
  • You know what? I think you're right, !empty($object->notExisting->alsoNotExisting) returns false, not a warning... I still get an error if I try to wrap a namespaced static function call if that method doesn't exist, but that's an edge case. – Breki Tomasson Jan 19 '18 at 5:13
  • The function you are looking for is empty(). Also read about isset() and how values of different types behave when they are compared or used in boolean context. – axiac Jan 19 '18 at 11:06
  • I still get an error if I try to wrap a namespaced static function call if that method doesn't exist – calls to undefined functions are a completely different cattle of fish than a falsey value. Function calls aren't typically variable and hence it makes little sense that you would have to deal with that situation. Falsey values OTOH are very common. – deceze Jan 19 '18 at 11:22
2

You can still go with empty. As the documentation states:

Determine whether a variable is considered to be empty. A variable is considered empty if it does not exist or if its value equals FALSE. empty() does not generate a warning if the variable does not exist.

Then we can check how PHP converts values to booleans:

When converting to boolean, the following values are considered FALSE:
-- the boolean FALSE itself
-- the integer 0 (zero)
-- the float 0.0 (zero)
-- the empty string, and the string "0"
-- an array with zero elements
-- the special type NULL (including unset variables)
-- SimpleXML objects created from empty tags
Every other value is considered TRUE (including any resource and NAN).

So, you should be good with just !empty, even if any level doesn't exist, such as:

!empty($foo)
!empty($foo->bar->num1)
!empty($foo['bar']['num1'])

None of the above should show a warning.


Now, when it comes to functions, we can't really use empty to check for it's existence. For that, we need to be more specific: function_exists or something alike, such as method_exists.

0

Generally, my go to is

if ( isset( $var) && $var !== 0 )
{
    // condition met
}

The shorthand AND operator will end if the value is not set, and if it is set, then it will check for NULL value. The shorthand checks should prevent errors for variable not set.

  • I'm not sure how the op treats it, but this will fail if $var = '0'. – FirstOne Jan 18 '18 at 17:47
  • @FirstOne that would be a case, but then it would be a string? I added that last condition since he asked for it to be a non-zero, the alternative could be != instead then. – Ice76 Jan 18 '18 at 17:54
  • Yeah, @Ice76, this is pretty much how I've been doing it, too, but I'm unhappy with the needless complexity of the statement - it's three separate requests just to guard for the next line. I've namespaced it away to allow me to as if (v::good($variable)), which returns 'true' on things that have a value and 'false' on things that are null, zero or non-existant, I was just trying to see if there was any more 'native' way to do it that didn't involve so many different queries on the variable. – Breki Tomasson Jan 19 '18 at 5:18
  • !is_null is redundant, isset already covers that. – deceze Jan 19 '18 at 11:23
  • @Breki v::good won't guard against undefined variables; a user defined function can't handle that. – deceze Jan 19 '18 at 11:25

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