8

I have 2 integers:

int first= 10;
int second = 20;

and a string representing the operation (one of +, -, /, or *):

String op = "+";

How can I get the result of 10 + 20 in this example?

13

I don't recommend this but is funny. in java6

String op = '+';
int first= 10;
int second = 20;
ScriptEngineManager scm = new ScriptEngineManager();
ScriptEngine jsEngine = scm.getEngineByName("JavaScript");
Integer result = (Integer) jsEngine.eval(first+op+second);

go with the switch, but remember to convert the string operator to char as switch don't works with strings yet.

switch(op.charAt(0)){
    case '+':
        return first + second;
        break;
   // and so on..
3
  • lol didn't know u could import javascript engine :D for the second option: i prefectly know i could use a switch (or an if..) i wanted a more "elegant" method
    – dynamic
    Jan 28 '11 at 22:28
  • how you can return this : return = ; return ||; return +; ?
    – user3402040
    Aug 13 '15 at 16:57
  • i am getting different results when i execute the same code natively Double result = (double) jsEngine.eval("10 + 20 / 12 * 3"); System.out.println(result); Double result2 = (double)(10 + 20 / 12 * 3); System.out.println(result2); Mar 14 '16 at 14:33
6
switch (op.charAt(0)) {
  case '+': return first + second;
  case '-': return first - second;
  // ...
}
2
  • 1
    Clearly OP isn't using a char, but you can use op.charAT(0). Be sure to check length.
    – moinudin
    Jan 28 '11 at 20:55
  • Depending on the situation, it might be easier to use a char instead, but I've updated the answer.
    – rpjohnst
    Jan 28 '11 at 21:01
3

you can try the following code. It's object oriented, quite generic, and you can easily extend it to add new operators, including operators with a different number of arguments:

public abstract class Operator {
  public abstract Integer compute(Integer...values);
}

public class Plus extends Operator {
  public Integer compute(Integer...values)   {
    return values[0] + values[1];
  }
}

public class Minus extends Operator {
  public Integer compute(Integer...values)   {
    return values[0] - values[1];
  }
}

public class Multiply extends Operator {
  public Integer compute(Integer...values)   {
    return values[0] * values[1];
  }
}


public class Divide extends Operator {
  public Integer compute(Integer...values)   {
    return values[0] / values[1];
  }
}

Map operatorMap = createOperatorMap();

public Map createOperatorMap() {
  Map<String, Operator> map = new HashMap<String, Operator>();
  map.put("+", new Plus());
  map.put("-", new Minus());
  map.put("*", new Multiply());
  map.put("/", new Divide());
  return map;
}

public int compute(int a, int b, String opString) {
  Operator op = operatorMap.get(opString);
  if (op == null)
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unknown operator");
  return op.compute(a, b);
}
3
  • Why Integer... values if all operations are only defined for two arguments? Ant this would be much nicer if it were an enum (probably with an interface). Jan 29 '11 at 12:28
  • using varargs enables extending the application in the future, so you can have additional operators that take zero, one, three arguments, etc..., without having to redesign everything. Anyway, it was intended as an example, it's pretty easy to change the design to just use 2 arguments.
    – Lolo
    Jan 29 '11 at 16:10
  • What's the point of using enums to implement integer operators? I mean, apart from the ability to use them in a "switch" statement, what does it bring?
    – Lolo
    Jan 29 '11 at 16:13
1
public double doMath(int first, int second, char op ){

    switch(op){
    case '+':
        return first + second;
        break;
    case '-':
        return first - second;
        break;
    case '*':
        return first * second;
        break;
    case '/':
        return first / second;
        break;
    default:
        return 0;
    }
}
0
switch(string){
}

(switch on strings)will be allowed in Java7. Now you can switch with char

switch(string.charAt(0)){
    case '+' : ...  
}

as mentioned above

1
  • case '+' is for a char, you probably want double quotes round it! Jan 28 '11 at 21:17

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