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Using this simple sample, there are 6 numbers currently ordered 5,4,3,2,1,0 and will be sorted as : 0,1,2,3,4,5

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int values[] = {5,4,3,2,1,0};
int sizeOfArray = sizeof(values)/sizeof(int);

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b) 
{
    printf("Comparing %d and %d \n",*(int*)a, *(int*)b);
   return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

int main () {
   int n;
   printf("Size of Array : %d\n", sizeOfArray);
   printf("Before sorting the list is: \n");
   for( n = 0 ; n < sizeOfArray; n++ ) {
      printf("%d ", values[n]);
   }

   printf("\n");

   qsort(values, sizeOfArray, sizeof(int), cmpfunc);

   printf("\nAfter sorting the list is: \n");
   for( n = 0 ; n < sizeOfArray; n++ ) {   
      printf("%d ", values[n]);
   }

   return(0);
}

Added to the cmpfunc function is a printf command to show the numbers being compared as each function is called.

Size of Array : 6
Before sorting the list is: 
5 4 3 2 1 0 
Comparing 4 and 3 
Comparing 5 and 3 
Comparing 5 and 4 
Comparing 1 and 0 
Comparing 2 and 0 
Comparing 2 and 1 
Comparing 3 and 0 
Comparing 3 and 1 
Comparing 3 and 2 

After sorting the list is: 
0 1 2 3 4 5 

Notice the application only calls the cmpfunc 9 times. I would have expected this function to be called numerous times more. Also notice that 5 or 4 is never compared to 2 or to 1.

Is anyone able to explain what is going on behind the scenes which causes this routine to be so efficient?

12
  • 8
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksort ?
    – zerkms
    Jan 18, 2018 at 20:03
  • 2
    Read about how quick sort algorithm works. I would have expected... - if you have some expectations, you should justify them.
    – Eugene Sh.
    Jan 18, 2018 at 20:03
  • 1
    Just Google quick sort
    – Ed Heal
    Jan 18, 2018 at 20:04
  • 1
    "Also notice that 5 or 4 is never compared to 2 or to 1." But 5 is compared to 4, and 4 is compared to 3, and 3 is compared to both 2 and to 1. Ordering satisfies transitivity, so those comparisons give enough information to know that 5 > 1 (for example). Jan 18, 2018 at 20:11
  • 3
    Note that qsort() is not specified to use the Quicksort algorithm. Jan 18, 2018 at 20:12

1 Answer 1

1

After researching "QuckSort" it makes a lot more sense. I modified the example to add an extra print statement.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int values[] = { 5,4,3,2,1,0};
int sizeOfArray = sizeof(values)/sizeof(int);

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b) 
{
    int n = 0;
   printf("Comparing %d and %d  current array looks like this :" ,*(int*)a, *(int*)b);
   for( n = 0 ; n < sizeOfArray; n++ ) 
   {
      printf("%d ", values[n]);
   }
   printf("\n");
   return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

int main () {
   int n;
   printf("Size of Array : %d\n", sizeOfArray);
   printf("Before sorting the list is: \n");
   for( n = 0 ; n < sizeOfArray; n++ ) 
   {
      printf("%d ", values[n]);
   }

   printf("\n");

   qsort(values, sizeOfArray, sizeof(int), cmpfunc);

   printf("\nAfter sorting the list is: \n");
   for( n = 0 ; n < sizeOfArray; n++ ) {   
      printf("%d ", values[n]);
   }

   return(0);
}

After reading the Wikipedia page and printing out the state of the array each time it makes sense what is going on and it matches the diagram flow.

Size of Array : 6
Before sorting the list is: 
5 4 3 2 1 0 
Comparing 4 and 3  current array looks like this :5 4 3 2 1 0 
Comparing 5 and 3  current array looks like this :5 3 4 2 1 0 
Comparing 5 and 4  current array looks like this :5 3 4 2 1 0 
Comparing 1 and 0  current array looks like this :3 4 5 2 1 0 
Comparing 2 and 0  current array looks like this :3 4 5 2 0 1 
Comparing 2 and 1  current array looks like this :3 4 5 2 0 1 
Comparing 3 and 0  current array looks like this :3 4 5 0 1 2 
Comparing 3 and 1  current array looks like this :3 4 5 0 1 2 
Comparing 3 and 2  current array looks like this :3 4 5 0 1 2 

After sorting the list is: 
0 1 2 3 4 5 
5
  • For the last 3 comparisons I noticed the array has not changed its order. Shouldn't those array orders been different for the last 3 comparisons? Jan 18, 2018 at 20:37
  • It's probably speeding things up by looking ahead before making a swap. I haven't really studied the algorithm, but I think at this point it basically knows 3, 4, and 5 are in order with respect to each other, and 0, 1, and 2 are in order with respect for each other. So now it's figuring out how those segments relate to each other. It sees 3 is bigger than 0, but instead of moving {3,4,5} after 0, it checks against 1. Sees that it belongs somewhere after 1, so then checks 2. Sees it belongs after 2 and there's nothing after 2, so it's found where {3,4,5} belongs. Jan 18, 2018 at 20:44
  • Since this "quicksort" is about efficiency, what you stated makes sense. Why bother making a move every time if you are searching to find when a single move can be done. Thanks. Jan 18, 2018 at 20:52
  • @UnhandledException: There is no reason a comparison should result in any change of element order. Before doing a comparison, you do not know whether a change is needed or not. The comparison might tell you that a change is needed, or it might tell you a change is not needed. If no change is needed, then no change is made. Consider what happens if you pass an already sorted array to qsort. Then it does not need to make any changes at all. But it cannot know that until it has done a number of comparisons. Jan 18, 2018 at 21:04
  • @Eric - Based on the rule for the return value if ">0 The element pointed by p1 goes after the element pointed by p2" this was interpreted as they actually swap but re-reading and it doesn't state a swap takes place but simply makes note that p1 goes after p2 which is in line with what you posted. Thanks. Jan 18, 2018 at 21:10

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