121

I want to do this:

public Name
{
    get;
    set
    {
        dosomething();
        ??? = value
    }
}

Is it possible to use the auto-generated private field?
Or is it required that I implement it this way:

private string name;
public string Name
{
    get
    {
        return name;
    }
    set
    {
        dosomething();
        name = value
    }
}
1

5 Answers 5

133

Once you want to do anything custom in either the getter or the setter you cannot use auto properties anymore.

45

You can try something like this:

public string Name { get; private set; }
public void SetName(string value)
{
    DoSomething();
    this.Name = value;
}
3
  • 7
    +1 To my mind this answer rebukes the accepted answer. It is using auto properties. It explicitly sets setter to private. This is a good thing because it lets the end user or developer know there is likely more going on behind the setter method.
    – ooXei1sh
    Oct 12, 2015 at 20:20
  • What's the difference between this and not having set at all? Nov 11, 2019 at 16:59
  • 5
    @SidhinSThomas not providing a private set would prevent the property from being set by its class's members; it would be strictly read-only. You would only be able to set its data in the constructor.
    – Bondolin
    Dec 3, 2019 at 13:59
18

As of C# 7, you could use expression body definitions for the property's get and set accessors.

See more here

private string _name;

public string Name
{
    get => _name;
    set
    {
        DoSomething();
        _name = value;
    }
}
2
  • 8
    Still using a private field though. Doesn't really help the OP.
    – TSmith
    Jun 11, 2019 at 21:32
  • 1
    While this works, it's like @TSmith says, it's not what the OP wants.
    – M. Ruiz
    May 25, 2020 at 21:27
17

This is not possible. Either auto implemented properties or custom code.

10

It is required that you implement it fully given your scenario. Both get and set must be either auto-implemented or fully implemented together, not a combination of the two.

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