3

I want to remove the extra space inside the plot's border

plt.boxplot(parkingData_agg['occupancy'], 0, 'rs', 0, 0.75)
plt.tight_layout() # This didn't work. Maybe it's not for the purpose I am thinking it is used for.
plt.yticks([0],['Average Occupancy per slot'])
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(5, 1), dpi=5) #Tried to change the figsize but it didn't work
plt.show()

enter image description here

The desired plot is as shown in the 2nd plot from left in the diagram below enter image description here

5
  • 2
    Do you mean the space in y-direction? Try playing with plt.ylim(). tight_layout() is for managing space between subplots. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 9:40
  • 1
    I guess you forgot to tell us how you would like the plot to look like instead. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 9:46
  • @ImportanceOfBeingErnest thank you for your answer. It was helpful. I wanted to reduce the padding between the boxplot and the border of the plot :) Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 10:23
  • Still pretty unclear, there are essentially those options. You did not describe which one you want. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 10:32
  • Apologies. I'll try to be clear the next time. I'll add this with the question. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

7

The order of commands in the code is a bit chaotic.

  • You need to define a figure, before the plotting command (otherwise a second figure is produced).
  • You also need to call tight_layout after setting the ticklabels, such that the long ticklabel can be accounted for.
  • To have the tick at position 0 match the position of the boxplot, it would need to be set to that position (pos=[0])

Those changes would lead to the following plot

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
data = np.random.rayleigh(scale=7, size=100)

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(5, 2), dpi=100)

plt.boxplot(data, False, sym='rs', vert=False, whis=0.75, positions=[0])

plt.yticks([0],['Average Occupancy per slot'])

plt.tight_layout() 
plt.show()

enter image description here

You may then change the widths of the boxplot(s) to match the desired outcome, e.g.

plt.boxplot(..., widths=[0.75])

enter image description here

You may of course put your plot in a subplot, not to have the axes fill the entire space of the figure, e.g.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
data = np.random.rayleigh(scale=7, size=100)

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(5, 3), dpi=100)
ax = plt.subplot(3,1,2)

ax.boxplot(data, False, sym='rs', vert=False, whis=0.75, positions=[0], widths=[0.5])

plt.yticks([0],['Average Occupancy per slot'])

plt.tight_layout()
plt.show()

enter image description here

1

use subplots_adjust

fig = plt.figure(figsize=(5, 2))
axes = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
axes.boxplot(parkingData_agg['occupancy'], 0, 'rs', 0, 0.75)
plt.subplots_adjust(left=0.1, right=0.9, top=0.6, bottom=0.4)

#plt.boxplot(parkingData_agg['occupancy'], 0, 'rs', 0, 0.75)
#plt.tight_layout()
plt.yticks([0],['Average Occupancy per slot'])
plt.show()

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