2

I'am new to the whole functional programming and reactive concept and trying to wrap my head around the following problem.

I have an API-Client for which i'am using Retrofit. There is also a local database which acts as a persistent cache for the API-response.

What i would like to achieve is something is like this:

  1. load objects from local database
  2. in case there are no objects or the database returned a null object:
    • perform API request and fetch data from online source
    • afterwards, persist received data and return the persisted data
  3. in case objects were returned from the local database, check if an online update is required
    • online update is required (fetch data online, persist and return persisted objects)
    • online update is not required (return local data)

What I came up with the is the following:

public class LocationCollectionRepository {
private final static Integer fetchInterval = 30; //Minutes
private final LocationService locationService;
private final LocalLocationCollectionRepository localRepository;

public LocationCollectionRepository(@NonNull LocationService locationService, @NonNull LocalLocationCollectionRepository localRepository) {
    this.locationService = locationService;
    this.localRepository = localRepository;
}

public Observable<LocationCollection> getLocationCollection() throws IOException {
    return localRepository.getLocationCollection()
            .takeWhile(this::shouldFetch)
            .flatMap(remoteCollection -> fetchLocationCollection())
            .takeWhile(this::isRequestSuccessful)
            .flatMap(locationCollectionResponse -> persistLocationCollection(locationCollectionResponse.body()));
}

//================================================================================
// Private methods
//================================================================================

private Observable<Response<LocationCollection>> fetchLocationCollection() throws IOException {
    return Observable.fromCallable(() -> {
        LocationServiceQueryBuilder queryBuilder = LocationServiceQueryBuilder.query();
        return queryBuilder.invoke(locationService).execute();
    });
}

private Observable<LocationCollection> persistLocationCollection(@NonNull LocationCollection locationCollection) {
    return localRepository.saveLocationCollection(locationCollection);
}

private boolean shouldFetch(@NonNull Optional<LocationCollection> locationCollection) {
    if (locationCollection.isPresent()) {
        Interval interval = new Interval(new DateTime(locationCollection.get().getTimestamp()), new DateTime());

        return locationCollection.get().getHashValue() == null || interval.toDuration().getStandardMinutes() > fetchInterval;
    } else {
        return true;
    }
}

private boolean isRequestSuccessful(Response<LocationCollection> locationCollectionResponse) throws Exception {
    if (locationCollectionResponse == null || !locationCollectionResponse.isSuccessful()) {
        throw new Exception(locationCollectionResponse.message());
    }
    return true;
}

}

The problem I'am having is that in case the database returned null no objects will be returned in my subscribe callback. I've tried the defaultIfEmpty-Method but came to the conclusion that this will also not help, because it expects an object and not an observable.

Any idea, how to solve this?

1

You should probably use Flowables instead. Anyhow, RxJava 2.x no longer accepts null values and will yield NullPointerException immediately or as a signal to downstream. If you do switch to Flowables then you can use something like .onErrorReturnItem(Collections.emptyList()) which is better than null in how much information it gives you. There are no results, instead of a null that could mean a different number of things.

| improve this answer | |
0

I've did some reevaluation of my original answer and came to the conclusion that most of the in place checks for the network response / need for fetching data from the network were not required at all.

First of all, in case something goes wrong the network request, an exception is thrown, which will go up the chain and handled by the onError-subscriber of the observable.

Second of all, the need of checking if the request was successful is also not required, because by making use of the exception it can only be successful when calling the next step in the chain.

And Third of all, the usage of takeWhile makes things much more complicated as it's actually required. I've decided to solve the problem by using a simple flatMap-Lambda that uses an pretty straight forward if-statement internally. Thus i think the code is much more readable and understandable.

Below you can find the final solution for my problem:

package com.appenetic.fame.model.repository.remote;

import android.support.annotation.NonNull;

import com.annimon.stream.Optional;
import com.appenetic.fame.api.service.LocationService;
import com.appenetic.fame.api.service.LocationServiceQueryBuilder;
import com.appenetic.fame.model.LocationCollection;
import com.appenetic.fame.model.repository.local.LocalLocationCollectionRepository;

import org.joda.time.DateTime;
import org.joda.time.Interval;

import java.io.IOException;

import io.reactivex.Observable;

/**
 * Created by shel on 18.01.18.
 */
public class LocationCollectionRepository {
    private final static Integer fetchInterval = 30; //Minutes
    private final LocationService locationService;
    private final LocalLocationCollectionRepository localRepository;

    public LocationCollectionRepository(@NonNull LocationService locationService, @NonNull LocalLocationCollectionRepository localRepository) {
        this.locationService = locationService;
        this.localRepository = localRepository;
    }

    public Observable<LocationCollection> getLocationCollection() throws IOException {
        return localRepository.getLocationCollection()
                .flatMap(locationCollectionOptional -> {
                    if (shouldFetch(locationCollectionOptional)) {
                        return persistLocationCollection(fetchLocationCollection().blockingFirst());
                    }

                    return Observable.just(locationCollectionOptional.get());
                });
    }

    //================================================================================
    // Private methods
    //================================================================================

    private Observable<LocationCollection> fetchLocationCollection() throws IOException {
        return Observable.fromCallable(() -> {
            LocationServiceQueryBuilder queryBuilder = LocationServiceQueryBuilder.query();
            return queryBuilder.invoke(locationService).execute().body();
        });
    }

    private Observable<LocationCollection> persistLocationCollection(@NonNull LocationCollection locationCollection) {
        return localRepository.saveLocationCollection(locationCollection);
    }

    private boolean shouldFetch(@NonNull Optional<LocationCollection> locationCollection) {
        if (locationCollection.isPresent()) {
            Interval interval = new Interval(new DateTime(locationCollection.get().getTimestamp()), new DateTime());

            return locationCollection.get().getHashValue() == null || interval.toDuration().getStandardMinutes() > fetchInterval;
        } else {
            return true;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.