3

I have a plain old C struct:

struct eggplant {
    double *ptr1;
    double *ptr2;
    ... // many more
}

and a function that manages the allocation the memory pointed to by the pointers, and returns a new eggplant instance:

struct eggplant *create_eggplant(int n);

The above function allocates a chunk of memory (including space for the newly created struct) and distributes it to the pointers.


I want to extend struct eggplant in C++11. I could do that by keeping a pointer to the struct as a

member:

class EggPlant {
    ...
    private :
        struct eggplant *plant;
}

or I could try via

inheritance:

class EggPlant : private struct eggplant {
    ...    
}

The first option allows me to use the create_eggplant function. However, the second option looks more straightforward from a conceptual point of view (the class EggPlant is an eggplant, it doesn't have one).

I tried

this = create_eggplant(...);

in the constructor but that does not work for the obvious reason that you cannot overwrite a pointer to a class that you are constructing (lvalue required).

Can I inherit the struct but still use my create_eggplant function in some useful way? Or, is it anyway better to keep a pointer to the struct?

10
  • 8
    In c++, use smart pointers instead of raw owning pointers.
    – Jarod42
    Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 17:39
  • 1
    private struct eggplant make that private eggplant, there's no need for struct here. It's only required to disambiguate between types and functions, like struct stat vs. stat(). Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 17:42
  • 1
    you dont need to say struct eggplant *plant - eggplant *plant is enough in c++
    – pm100
    Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 17:43
  • 1
    as a reminder (or maybe new info) - in c++ class and struct as basically the same thing (just the default is private for members in class and public in struct). Just in case you are thinking that class and struct are radically different things
    – pm100
    Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 17:46
  • 1
    How does create_eggplant handle the allocation? If eggplants don't need a very specific allocation scheme, then taking the choice of allocation from the caller is bad design. At the very least there should be an init_eggplant that does default initialization only. Then you could have had your inheritance based scheme work. But if the eggplant objects need to all be allocated with a specific allocator, you shouldn't think about inheritance. Go the composition route. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

4

Your choice to have struct eggplant *create_eggplant(int n); manage its own memory is in conflict with C++ inheritance. Inheritance also implies management of the location of the base object.

If you changed your C function to return a copy:

struct eggplant create_eggplant(int n);

You could also inherit from that class:

class EggPlant : private eggplant {
    EggPlant(int n) : eggplant{ create_eggplant(n) }
    {
    }
    ...    
};
2
  • I like your suggestion, it is clean. However, with the function returning a pointer-to-struct, I can clean it up with a simple free(new_eggplant). Returning a copy (and thus having a shallow copy), wouldn't I lose track of the pointer returned by malloc inside create_eggplant?
    – Nibor
    Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 19:11
  • @Nibor in this proposed answer, create_eggplant would no longer need or have a malloc. You are correct that you would not be able to clean up eggplant separately from cleaning up EggPlant. Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 19:26
1

No, you would need a new function if you wish to inherit. If you must use the existing function a member is the best you will be able to manage.

1
  • Is this a common (anti-)pattern?
    – Nibor
    Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 17:40
1
struct eggplant *create_eggplant(int n);

Should be just:

eggplant *create_eggplant(int n);

This isn't C, you don't have to type struct everywhere.

However, the second option looks more straightforward from a conceptual point of view (the class EggPlant is an eggplant, it doesn't have one).

That's wrong. Only public inheritance models is-a. Private inheritance models has-a or is-implemented-in-terms-of.

Can I inherit the struct but still use my create_eggplant function in some useful way?

No, not in a useful way, especially as your description of create_eggplant sounds like malloc is used in it.

Or, is it anyway better to keep a pointer to the struct?

No, pointers make code more complicated.

If you want to use private inheritance, then either add a constructor to eggplant that more or less does what create_eggplant does now, except of allocating memory for the eggplant itself, or modify create_eggplant to become something like void init_eggplant(eggplant& e), then do this in the constructor of EggPlant:

EggPlant::EggPlant() :
    eggplant()
{
    init_eggplant(*this);
}

Or just don't use private inheritance but a normal data member:

class EggPlant
{
    // ...
private:
    eggplant my_eggplant;
}

As you can see, the common goal of all solutions is to get rid of the dynamic memory allocation for eggplant.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.