12

I'm currently working on a chat bot that will perform commands. One thing I want it to do is be able to run scripts and output the stdout of the script into the chat.

The issue I am having is that the function collects all of the stdout of the script and returns them all at the end, I'd like to try and modify it to write in real time and have had issues doing so.

What I think the issue might involve is that there is only one way for it to return text to the chat channel and that is via the return function of reboot. However I'd like to iterate over the exec command and output that if possible.

Here's my code:

func reboot(command *bot.Cmd) (string, error) {
    n := command.Args[0]
    // this return is what all gets sent into chat channel
    return runcommand(n), nil
  }


func runcommand(server string) string {
    cmd := exec.Command("/bin/bash", "-c", "python test.py %s", server)
    cmdOutput := &bytes.Buffer{}
    cmd.Stdout = cmdOutput
    err := cmd.Run()
    if err !=nil {
        os.Stderr.WriteString(err.Error())
    }
        return fmt.Sprintf(string(cmdOutput.Bytes()))
}
5
  • 1
    You need to change reboot to launch a goroutine that launches the command. You can pass something like a channel or simply a io.Reader (eg: the output of StdoutPipe). That should be enough to get you started.
    – Marc
    Commented Jan 20, 2018 at 10:18
  • I deleted my answer since it didn't solve your problem. I've tried to solve it in several ways but all that don't write directly to stdout seem to buffer the output.
    – md2perpe
    Commented Jan 22, 2018 at 22:22
  • Try running python -u test.py. Python output is buffered by default and may cause problems in your case (specially if you output is short). Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 7:59
  • @ArmanOrdookhani That worked! Thank you!
    – Blooze
    Commented Jan 28, 2018 at 3:25
  • @Blooze You're welcome :) Commented Jan 28, 2018 at 7:12

2 Answers 2

22

A real time command pipe for redis.log. (you can call bgsave to test it.)

package main

import (
    "os"
    "os/exec"
    "fmt"
    "bufio"
)

func main() {
    cmd := exec.Command("tail", "-f",  "/usr/local/var/log/redis.log")

    // create a pipe for the output of the script
    cmdReader, err := cmd.StdoutPipe()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "Error creating StdoutPipe for Cmd", err)
        return
    }

    scanner := bufio.NewScanner(cmdReader)
    go func() {
        for scanner.Scan() {
            fmt.Printf("\t > %s\n", scanner.Text())
        }
    }()

    err = cmd.Start()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "Error starting Cmd", err)
        return
    }

    err = cmd.Wait()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Fprintln(os.Stderr, "Error waiting for Cmd", err)
        return
    }
}
1

I haven't found a solution to your problem, but I have found something strange.

I wrote three versions of a program that repeatingly output a short string with one second interval, one in Python, one in C, and one in Go:

talker.py

import time

while True:
        print("Now!")
        time.sleep(1)

talker.c

#include <unistd.h>

main() {
        for(;;) {
                write(1, "Now!\n", 5);
                sleep(1);
        }
}

talker.go

package main

import (
        "fmt"
        "time"
)

func main() {
        for {
                fmt.Println("Now!")
                time.Sleep(time.Second)
        }
}

When I run them by themselves (e.g. python ./talker.py) they seem to work exactly the same. But when I pipe the output to cat I see a difference; the C and Go version gets their output through to the screen immediately, but not so the Python version. Its output gets buffered and doesn't show up on screen until enough data has been collected.

I even tried with a simple Go version of cat, and that doesn't change the behaviour:

package main

import (
        "io"
        "os"
)

func main() {
        io.Copy(os.Stdout, os.Stdin)
}
4
  • If your Python script is small and easy to rewrite in Go, then perhaps it will work doing that.
    – md2perpe
    Commented Jan 23, 2018 at 20:08
  • 2
    Python stdout if buffered by default. Use python -u talker.py to run unbuffered version. Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 7:57
  • @ArmanOrdookhani. Thanks, that worked. But why doesn't it seem buffered when writing directly to the consol? Does Python detect if stdout is connected to the consol?
    – md2perpe
    Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 14:50
  • I don't know a definite answer. I think Python line buffers stdout if it's connected to a tty (console). I think C printf is the same, you used write syscall that don't use C buffering system. Go chose to be unbuffered by default in all places. Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 15:33

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