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I'm actually new to React, and can't choose, what is the best way to store data in a situation like this: I have a form with some inputs, and I need to do some actions with all data from these inputs on submit. All inputs are stored in one Component. So, I need to get all the data only on submit. And now I'm trying to choose the best way to store this data. I see 2 ways:

  • Storing data in the state. But as React Docs describes:

    "Only data which need to render may store in the state."

    But I don't need this data for render, I need to work with this only on submit.

  • Storing as class variables. It looks good for me, because when i using state, i need to call setState(), which trigger render(which i don't need), or this.state.data = ....But React Docs says that:

    "You may change state directly only in constructor."

So, which of these ways are better and why?

  • You can also use refs – E. Sundin Jan 20 '18 at 13:47
  • 1
    How "You may change state directly only in constructor." is blocking you from storing data in class variables/object properties? – Ihor Burlachenko Jan 20 '18 at 14:30
  • You might want to look into redux for state management – Moritz Roessler Jan 20 '18 at 14:39
  • @IhorBurlachenko It was argument to don't use state, not class variables, I see class variables as properly way here, but i'm not sure – Vanya Makhlinets Jan 20 '18 at 14:45
  • ‘Directly changing state" here refers to not using setState, e.g., directly assigning state. One reason to keep form data in state is that other form elements may need state data, and my need to re-render. You can control the need to re-render via shouldComponentRender or whatever its called. Keeping it all in one place is pretty handy and eliminates the need to pull it from multiple locations—but in the long run it’s a matter of your needs. – Dave Newton Jan 20 '18 at 21:29
3

I think you're overthinking it, just stick with controlled components and manage your form data through state.

However, if you really don't want to use controlled components because you don't want the render method to be called then you don't have to.

This is because form elements work a little bit differently from other DOM elements in React, because in HTML, form elements such as <input>, <textarea>, and <select> naturally maintain their own state and update it based on user input. See official forms docs.

And React doesn't take that away from you. This means that you can make use of forms the same way you would with vanilla JS.

Also worth mentioning that in React world this way of leaving data to be purely handled by the DOM rather than handling it with a React Component is known as Uncontrolled Component.

Implementation

As far as how this would look in practise, I can think of two ways that you can do this, one would be with refs:

handleSubmit = (e) => {
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log(this.input.value); // whatever you typed into the input
}

render() {
  return (
    <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
      <input type="text" name="name" ref={input => this.input = input} />
      <input type="submit" value="submit" />
    </form>
  );
}

Another way would be through an event object:

handleSubmit = (e) => {
  e.preventDefault();
  console.log(e.target.name.value); // whatever you typed into the input
}

render() {
  return (
    <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
      <input type="text" name="name" />
      <input type="submit" value="submit" />
    </form>
  );
}
  • Now suppose, you are using react/redux state to control form. And the form has 200 fields. So, will you store the object with 200 keys-values of each field in state and update the state on evry field change ? If we do this, wont this make form slow ? – Piyush Oct 11 '19 at 16:31
0

For storing formularies I would definitely choose to store data in the state, if you look at the React form official documentation they explain what I think is your case.

The standard you will see the most, as far as I know, is this:

class Form extends Component {
    constructor (props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      name: '',
      surname: ''
    }
  }

  handleSubmit = (e) => {
    e.preventDefault();
    // send data from the actual state
  }

  handleChange = (e) => {
    this.setState({[e.target.name]: e.target.value})
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>
        <input type="text" name="name" onChange={this.handleChange} />
        <input type="text" name="surname" onChange={this.handleChange} />
        <input type="submit" value="submit" />
      </form>
    )
  }
}

Take a look at this JSFiddle I did for you! And check your console when sending the input.

  • Now suppose, you are using react/redux state to control form. And the form has 200 fields. So, will you store the object with 200 keys-values of each field in state and update the state on evry field change ? If we do this, wont this make form slow ? – Piyush Oct 11 '19 at 16:32
0

You might want to check out redux-form. Its great tool for form validation!

Its a bit of a challenge to get started with, but really smooth once you get the hang of it.

Also the docs are great.

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