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Can anyone tell me how Microsoft Word comes up with the name for MSODataStore storage objects? I.e. what does the name represent? For example, here's the attached image hex of a word .doc file with the name in hex highlighted in the image:

 4A 00 59 00 D5 00 DD 00 CA 00 D2 00 4A 00 54 00 DD 00 45 00 DA 00 D8 00 46 00 49 00 44 00 D4 00 30 00 48 00 35 00 CE 00 CC 00 D0 00 3D 00 3D 00 

What is this thing!? I know it's the name of a custom xml storage, but specifically why is it given a name in this form? Is there anyway of decoding the (oh so strange) name to find the underlying meaning? I've looked at numerous examples and can say:

  • Overwriting the name with zeros doesn't change the word document, or its metadata. It renders just as before.
  • It's always created as a storage object name (denoted by "01" at offset 0xC7C4), not a stream name (which is a "02").
  • As it's storage, I would have thought, it can't be "chained" offset locations. And as deleting it changes nothing, then it's even less likely to be offset locations.
  • The given length is always 32 bytes (see offset 0xC7C0), even though in every case (I've seen) only 24 are used.
  • It always ends with "3D 3D", or "==" in ascii, which implies some sort of padding. Base64 is often padded this way.
  • If I translate the hex to Base64, save as .bin and run the linux command file .bin it tells me it's either just "data" or in this case "ISO-8859 text, with no line terminators", which works out as "JYÕÝÊÒJTÝEÚØ FIDÔ0H5ÎÌÐ".
  • Maybe it's a different binary to text encoding?
  • It doesn't appear to be a CLSID as this is often written separately and the number of characters doesn't add up.

Looking at the Docs for MSODataStore objects isn't very helpful. They say:

from: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd910522(v=office.12).aspx

"2.3.6 Custom XML Data Storage The Custom XML Data Storage specifies how to store a collection of XML fragments. It can be used to roundtrip arbitrary custom XML data with the document. This storage SHOULD<76> be created to store any XML fragment.

The name of this storage MUST be "MsoDataStore". Within this storage, zero or more sub-storages exist. The name of each of these sub-storages MUST be unique. Each of these sub-storages MUST contain two streams within it as specified in section 2.3.6.1 and 2.3.6.2 respectively."

It being "unique" doesn't reveal why they've chosen this bizarre method. Just naming the storage "Bob/Mary1,2,3..." would be unique. But instead there's a 24 byte hex string, that they then 64bit(?) encode. If it's just a random string, then how do they check it's unique?

This thing is driving me nuts! Can anyone help with how this name is derived and why it's in the form it is?

2
+100

To answer your question, we have to have a look at the binary file format used by Word and some specialties of the Custom XML storage. At the end there are some quick answers to your main point.

Compound File Format

Binary Word documents use the compound document format (often also referred to as "structured storage"). This is a container format similar to a zip archive (but without compression). The specification of the format is available at the following URL:

[MS-CFB]: Compound File Binary File Format.

Directory Entries in Compound Files

The structure you are wondering about (starting at offset 0xC780 in your example) is a StructuredStorageDirectoryEntry:

struct StructuredStorageDirectoryEntry {    // [offset from start in bytes, length in bytes] 
    BYTE _ab[32*sizeof(WCHAR)]; // [000H,64] 64 bytes. The Element name in Unicode, 
                                //           padded with zeros to fill this byte array 
    WORD _cb;                   // [040H,02] Length of the Element name in characters, not bytes 
    BYTE _mse;                  // [042H,01] Type of object: value taken from the STGTY enumeration 
    BYTE _bflags;               // [043H,01] Value taken from DECOLOR enumeration. 
    SID _sidLeftSib;            // [044H,04] SID of the left-sibling of this entry in the directory tree 
    SID _sidRightSib;           // [048H,04] SID of the right-sibling of this entry in the directory tree 
    SID _sidChild;              // [04CH,04] SID of the child acting as the root of all the children of this // element (if _mse=STGTY_STORAGE) 
    GUID _clsId;                // [050H,16] CLSID of this storage (if _mse=STGTY_STORAGE) 
    DWORD _dwUserFlags;         // [060H,04] User flags of this storage (if _mse=STGTY_STORAGE) 
    TIME_T _time[2];            // [064H,16] Create/Modify time-stamps (if _mse=STGTY_STORAGE) 
    SECT _sectStart;            // [074H,04] starting SECT of the stream (if _mse=STGTY_STREAM) 
    ULONG _ulSize;              // [078H,04] size of stream in bytes (if _mse=STGTY_STREAM) 
    DFPROPTYPE _dptPropType;    // [07CH,02] Reserved for future use. Must be zero. 
    };

So we can see now already that the field at offset 0xC780 is used to store the name of directory entry with a fixed size of 64 bytes to contain a Unicode string of length 32.

We can even look at the name if we open the file with a structured storage viewer application such as SSView:

Word document opened in SSView

Given that this name is only the name of an object (folder) inside the container file format, it is obvious that changing this name does not change the contents or metadata of the Word document. However, this name must still be unique at the level of the container items. So if you have several custom XML parts in your document and null this value for each part, you will get a corrupt compound document file.

So lastly, where does the name actually come from? The name is indeed an encoded Guid value, namely the itemID of the data store (highlighted in the screenshot above).

Encoding

How is the value encoded? As you already assumed the encoding is base64, however using a custom character table. This is not documented so we can only guess by playing around with different itemID values. You can do that for example by creating a Word document in Open XML format (*.docx), adding a Custom XML part (from the Developer tab of the Ribbon), changing the itemID value in the itemProps1.xml part of the document and then saving the document in binary .doc format.

After a bit of reverse engineering we can find that the following character table is used for the encoding:

char[] lookupTable=new char[64]
    { 'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M',
      'N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
      '0','1','2','3','4','5','À','Á','Â','Ã','Ä','Å','Æ',
      'Ç','È','É','Ê','Ë','Ì','Í','Î','Ï','Ð','Ñ','Ò','Ó',
      'Ô','Õ','Ö','×','Ø','Ù','Ú','Û','Ü','Ý','Þ','ß'};

as compared to the standard base64 table:

char[] lookupTableOrig=new char[64]
    { 'A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M',
      'N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z',
      'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m',
      'n','o','p','q','r','s','t','u','v','w','x','y','z',
      '0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','+','/'};

We can now write a function that maps between the standard encoding and the custom encoding used by Word:

void Main()
{
    Guid guid = Guid.Parse("{8D9BF81F-08C7-4E0D-BE38-04A4EA84DD1F}");
    byte[] bytes = guid.ToByteArray();
    string encoded = Convert.ToBase64String(bytes);

    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char c in encoded)
        sb.Append(customEncodingCharMapping.ContainsKey(c) ? customEncodingCharMapping[c] : c);

    Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());   
}

Dictionary<char, char> customEncodingCharMapping = new Dictionary<char, char>
    {
        {'a', '0'}, 
        {'b', '1'}, 
        {'c', '2'}, 
        {'d', '3'}, 
        {'e', '4'}, 
        {'f', '5'}, 
        {'g', 'À'}, 
        {'h', 'Á'}, 
        {'i', 'Â'}, 
        {'j', 'Ã'}, 
        {'k', 'Ä'}, 
        {'l', 'Å'}, 
        {'m', 'Æ'}, 
        {'n', 'Ç'}, 
        {'o', 'È'}, 
        {'p', 'É'}, 
        {'q', 'Ê'}, 
        {'r', 'Ë'}, 
        {'s', 'Ì'}, 
        {'t', 'Í'}, 
        {'u', 'Î'}, 
        {'v', 'Ï'}, 
        {'w', 'Ð'}, 
        {'x', 'Ñ'}, 
        {'y', 'Ò'}, 
        {'z', 'Ó'}, 
        {'0', 'Ô'}, 
        {'1', 'Õ'}, 
        {'2', 'Ö'}, 
        {'3', '×'}, 
        {'4', 'Ø'}, 
        {'5', 'Ù'}, 
        {'6', 'Ú'}, 
        {'7', 'Û'}, 
        {'8', 'Ü'}, 
        {'9', 'Ý'}, 
        {'+', 'Þ'}, 
        {'/', 'ß'}
    };

Answers to your main questions:

Overwriting the name with zeros doesn't change the word document, or its metadata. It renders just as before.

As the name is just the name of a folder in the compound file container, changing it does not affect the actual contents of the Word document. The only requirement is that this name is unique.

It's always created as a storage object name (denoted by "01" at offset 0xC7C4), not a stream name (which is a "02").

Yes, it is the name of a folder/directory inside the container. You can see it when viewing the file using SSView.

As it's storage, I would have thought, it can't be "chained" offset locations. And as deleting it changes nothing, then it's even less likely to be offset locations.

It is the name of the folder, no offsets or pointers inside the file.

The given length is always 32 bytes (see offset 0xC7C0), even though in every case (I've seen) only 24 are used.

The fixed length is determined by the definition of the StructuredStorageDirectoryEntry struct. It is always 64 bytes long, and padded with zeros.

It always ends with "3D 3D", or "==" in ascii, which implies some sort of padding. Base64 is often padded this way.

If I translate the hex to Base64, save as .bin and run the linux command file .bin it tells me it's either just "data" or in this case "ISO-8859 text, with no line terminators", which works out as "JYÕÝÊÒJTÝEÚØ FIDÔ0H5ÎÌÐ". Maybe it's a different binary to text encoding?

It is indeed base64 encoding. But for some reason Word uses a non-standard mapping of characters.

It doesn't appear to be a CLSID as this is often written separately and the number of characters doesn't add up.

Indeed, it is a CLSID or Guid value, namely the itemID of the Custom XML part embedded into the Word document.

  • Dirk, that was excellent! Thank you so much! I especially appreciate the code and mapping tables. – David Blake Jan 24 '18 at 17:29
  • Dirk thank you so much, that was really excellent. I especially appreciate the code and tables. I have a query though! Is your screenshot for "my" document, or just as an example? (The document I used is available here: endowment.tpu.ru/files/dogovor-UL.doc) Because an Item UUID for the custom storage is given in plain text (once converted to DOCX and unzipped) in the XML as AB7D8D25-5322-4EF4-B814-80F46877EEB3. Your example is different (8D9BF81F-08C7-4E0D-BE38-04A4EA84DD1F). Could it perhaps be the computer's GUID, or the GUID for the registration of WORD? – David Blake Jan 24 '18 at 17:41
  • My screenshot was just my example using a different GUID. If I take your GUID value and convert it I get JYÕÝÊÒJTÝEÚØFIDÔ0H5ÎÌÐ== as the name of the folder in the compound file which seems to match your screenshot. So no, it is not a computer GUID nor some value bound to your registration or license. – Dirk Vollmar Jan 24 '18 at 17:50
  • Thanks again Dirk. A perfect answer! You've answered something that's been driving me crazy..! – David Blake Jan 24 '18 at 18:11

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