10

I am very new in C and was wondering about how to get each element of an array using a pointer. Which is easy if and only if you know the size of the array. So let the code be:

#include <stdio.h>

int main (int argc, string argv[]) {
    char * text = "John Does Nothing";
    char text2[] = "John Does Nothing";

    int s_text = sizeof(text); // returns size of pointer. 8 in 64-bit machine
    int s_text2 = sizeof(text2); //returns 18. the seeked size.

    printf("first string: %s, size: %d\n second string: %s, size: %d\n", text, s_text, text2, s_text2);

    return 0;
}

Now I want to determine the size of text. to do this, I found out, that the String will end with a '\0' character. So I wrote the following function:

int getSize (char * s) {
    char * t; // first copy the pointer to not change the original
    int size = 0;

    for (t = s; s != '\0'; t++) {
        size++;
    }

    return size;
}

This function however does not work as the loop seems to not terminate.

So, is there a way to get the actual size of the chars the pointer points on?

  • This unfortunately doesn't change anything in the result. doesn't matter whether I use s != '\0' or *s != '\0' or t != '\0' or *t != '\0', it ends up still not terminating… – christopher westburry Jan 21 '18 at 13:06
  • You're reimplementing strlen. – melpomene Jan 21 '18 at 13:07
  • Your function doesn't use s, so what's the point in preserving "the original" value? – melpomene Jan 21 '18 at 13:08
12

Instead of checking the pointer you have to check the current value. You can do it like this:

int getSize (char * s) {
    char * t; // first copy the pointer to not change the original
    int size = 0;

    for (t = s; *t != '\0'; t++) {
        size++;
    }

    return size;
}

Or more concisely:

int getSize (char * s) {
    char * t;    
    for (t = s; *t != '\0'; t++)
        ;
    return t - s;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Only problem with this one is, it returns always one char less. So adding +1 in the end works. Only if the string isn't empty to begin with. But thanks! Ima work around it now :D – christopher westburry Jan 21 '18 at 13:16
  • Also, if you are using an empty loop, make it easier to detect by using empty-braces, e.g. for (t = s; *t; t++) {} (you at least moved the ';' to a line of its own -- that was good) – David C. Rankin Jan 21 '18 at 13:21
2

There is a typo in this for loop

for (t = s; s != '\0'; t++) {
            ^^^^^^^^^          

I think you mean

for (t = s; *t != '\0'; t++) {
            ^^^^^^^^^          

Nevertheless in general the function does not provide a value that is equivalent to the value returned by the operator sizeof even if you will count also the terminating zero. Instead it provides a value equivalent to the value returned by the standard function strlen.

For example compare the output of this code snippet

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

//...

char s[100] = "Hello christopher westburry";

printf( "sizeof( s ) = %zu\n", sizeof( s ) );
printf( "strlen( s ) = %zu\n", strlen( s ) + 1 );

So your function just calculates the length of a string.

It would be more correctly to define it the following way (using pointers)

size_t getSize ( const char * s ) 
{
    size_t size = 0;

    while ( *s++ ) ++size;

    return size;
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.