I am new to Perl and I am trying to better understand when and how to pass references to nested data structures. Here is an outline of what I am doing:

  1. Pass list of String to sub1
  2. Have sub1 return a reference to a list inside a hash
  3. Pass return value of sub1 to sub2
  4. Have sub2 return a reference to a list inside a hash
  5. Iterate over list returned from sub2 and put into a new hash
  6. Pass reference to new hash to sub3
  7. Have sub3 return a reference to a new hash

I am trying to pass references to the subroutines and have them return references. Is that the recommended way of doing things?

Here is the code and my comments on what I think it is doing.:

# create normal list
my @list1 = qw(1 2 3); 

# this passes a reference of list1 to sub1 and $result1 is 
  a reference to return value of sub1
my $result1 = sub1(\@list1) 

# passes reference of result1 to sub2 and result2 is a reference 
  to return value of sub2
my $result2 = sub2($result1) 

my %hash1;

# dereferences list1 to the largest index to iterate until 
  and creates a key value pair in hash1 using the current 
  index of the loop. Also dereference result2 to get the 
  hash at the index.
for my $i (0 .. $#list1) {
  $hash1{$list1[$i]} = @{$result2}[$i];  
}

my $result3 = sub3(\%hash1);

sub sub1 {
  # dereference list passed in?
  my ($list1) = @_; 

  my $result = {hash containing a list} from service call using $list1;

  # dereferences result to return list2, 
    is this returning the list or a reference?
  return $result->{list2}; 
}

sub sub2 {
  # dereference list passed in?
  my ($list2) = @_; 

  my $result = {hash containing a list} from service call using $list2;

  # dereferences result to return list3, is 
    this returning the list or a reference?
  return $result->{list3} 
}

sub sub3 {
  # dereference hash1 ?
  my ($hash1) = @_ 

  my %result3;

  # loop over key value pairs of dereferenced hash1
  while (my ($key, $value) = each %$hash1) { 
    my %hash2;

    # loop over item list inside hash that is 
      the value of the current key in the outer loop
    foreach my $item (@{ $value->{items} }) {
      if( !(defined $hash2{flag1}) ) {
        $hash2{flag1} = $item->{flags}->{flag1};
      }

      switch ($item->{costName}) {
        case 'name1' {
          $hash2{name1} += $item->{costName}->{value};
        }

        case 'name2' {
          $hash2{name2} += $item->{costName}->{value};
        }

        # I want to also add a case where I compare the current value to two strings to see if it is not equal to both. Can this be done in a Perl switch.


      }

      # set the value for this key in result3 to reference of hash2
      $result3{$key} = \%hash2; 
    }

# return reference to result3
return \%result3
}

Please let me know if I am referencing and dereferencing correctly. So far I have the output I am expecting, but I can't tell if I am going about this in a really inefficient way or just using references wrong. Thanks.

EDIT: One thing that is happening which I can't understand how is when I run this line: $hash1{$list1[$i]} = @{$result2}[$i]; inside that for loop, the second key (i=1) receives the value that was intended for the first key (i=0). I verified the right data is at the right index in the result2 list. What is happening here?

  • As for "Is that the recommended way of doing things?" -- if you want to pass them around a lot then that's likely the best way; if you have multiple multi-valued variables to pass, then you practically have to pass reference. A sub receives a mere list of scalars; an array argument is flattened into a list of its elements, a hash goes in as a list of key-values. – zdim Jan 22 at 3:03
  • With so much traffic of same/related data maybe you should write it all as a class instead. – zdim Jan 22 at 3:07

I'm going to annotate your code with my comments, i.e. I'm going to rewrite the # inline annotations and add more exposition in plain text below.

First off, you're missing

use strict;
use warnings;

Every Perl file you write should start with this (or equivalent; e.g. use Moose enables this for you).

# create normal array
my @list1 = qw(1 2 3); 

@list1 is an array. The qw(1 2 3) part on the right-hand side is a list.

# pass a reference to @list1 to sub1 and assign the return value of sub1 to $result1
my $result1 = sub1(\@list1);

You were missing a ; at the end of this statement. $result1 is (a copy of) the return value of sub1, not a reference to it.

# pass $result1 to sub2; $result2 is the return value of sub2
my $result2 = sub2($result1);

(See above.)

my %hash1;

# iterate over the indices of @list1. $#list1 is the last index of @list1.
# Initialize %hash1 with keys taken from @list1 and corresponding values from @{$result2}.

for my $i (0 .. $#list1) {
  $hash1{$list1[$i]} = @{$result2}[$i];  
}

$#list1 doesn't dereference anything; @list1 is not a reference.

@{$result2}[$i] is technically a list slice. Just as you're using $list1[$i] to get a single element from an array, you should use ${$result2}[$i] to get a single element from an array reference. The @ happens to work here (the list slice only contains a single element), but it's better to request a scalar if that's what you want.

Also, idiomatic Perl would be $result2->[$i] to get a single element from an array reference.

You don't need this loop at all:

@hash1{@list1} = @{$result2};

This is a hash slice. We use the elements of @list1 as keys and @{$result2} as the corresponding values.

my $result3 = sub3(\%hash1);

sub sub1 {
  # Parameter list (done manually). The first argument goes in $list1.
  my ($list1) = @_; 

There is no dereferencing here. This is just list assignment: We assign the list of elements of @_ (our arguments) to ($list1), i.e. our first argument gets the local name $list1.

  my $result = {hash containing a list} from service call using $list1;

I don't know what you're doing here. This is a syntax error.

  # return the value stored under key 'list2' in the hash %{$result}
  return $result->{list2};

This returns a scalar value. It might be a reference if that's what's stored in the %{$result} hash.

}

sub sub2 {

I'm skipping this. See sub1 above.

}

sub sub3 {
  # put first argument in local variable called $hash1
  my ($hash1) = @_;

You were missing a ; again.

  my %result3;

  # loop over key value pairs of dereferenced hash1
  while (my ($key, $value) = each %$hash1) {

Note that using each is not recommended. It uses/modifies hidden state in the hash you use it on, so it will break if any code in the loop calls each or keys or values on the hash you're iterating over.

    my %hash2;

    # loop over item list inside hash that is 
    # the value of the current key in the outer loop
    foreach my $item (@{ $value->{items} }) {

Specifically, this code assumes $value (the current value in %{$hash1}) is a reference to another hash, which contains a reference to an array under the key 'items'. This array is what we're iterating over.

      if( !(defined $hash2{flag1}) ) {
        $hash2{flag1} = $item->{flags}->{flag1};
      }

      switch ($item->{costName}) {

Perl has no switch statement. You must be using a module that messes with Perl's syntax. If it's use Switch, stop: This module has several issues. It rewrites the code of your program before the Perl parser sees it and it doesn't always get it right. That means Perl might be executing different code from what you've written. It also has fairly complicated behavior, which can cause unexpected behavior even if the code rewriting part was successful.

        case 'name1' {
          $hash2{name1} += $item->{costName}->{value};
        }

        case 'name2' {
          $hash2{name2} += $item->{costName}->{value};
        }

        # I want to also add a case where I compare the current value to two strings to see if it is not equal to both.
        # Can this be done in a Perl switch.

As I was saying, there is no such thing as a Perl switch. (Technically there's given/when, but those suffer from the same complex / hard-to-predict behavior issues. They're officially "experimental" now (behavior subject to change in a future release).

      }

      # set the value for this key in result3 to reference of hash2
      $result3{$key} = \%hash2; 
    }

# return reference to result3
return \%result3
}

That's it for code annotations. If you have questions about the actual behavior of your program, you need to post a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable Example.

  • when I try @hash1{@list1} = @{$result2}; instead of the loop, hash1{list1[1]} gets the value result2[0] and hash1{list[0]} gets the value result2[1]. how do they become swapped? – Seephor Jan 22 at 2:32
  • @Seephor Again, you need to post a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. – melpomene Jan 22 at 2:32
  • understood. I scrubbed my original code so it would be easier to read but I introduced syntax errors since I was just editing it on SO. Also I read about the switch statement here: perldoc.perl.org/5.8.9/Switch.html I am using Perl 5.8 – Seephor Jan 22 at 2:36
  • @Seephor 5.8 was first released in 2002. Consider upgrading. – melpomene Jan 22 at 2:39
  • not an option for me. – Seephor Jan 22 at 2:41

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