4

I am working on Linux. I have 2 files - file1.dat and file2.dat.

cat file1.dat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

and for file2:

cat file2.dat
1a
2a
3a
4a
5a
6a
7a
8a
9a
10a

I want to replace first 4 lines from file1.dat with first 3 lines from file2.dat. So my output would be following

cat file1.dat
1a
2a
3a
5
6
7
8
9
10

I tried following input:

sed -i.bak '1,4d;3r file2.dat' file1.dat

But with this input I have following output:

5
6
7
8
9
10

How should I modify input command? I tried various combinations.

1
  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your question neatly mentions the required output given an input and portrays your effort in the form of your try with sed. Kudos, and have a nice time here :-). Now you can accept an answer that deems fit.
    – sjsam
    Jan 22 '18 at 14:31
7

Following awk may also help you in same, tested codes in GNU awk.

Solution 1st:

awk 'FNR==NR && FNR<4{print;next} FNR>4 && FNR!=NR' file2.dat file1.dat

Solution 2nd:

awk 'FNR==NR && FNR==4{nextfile} FNR==NR{print;next} FNR>4 && FNR!=NR' file2.dat file1.dat
OR
awk 'FNR==NR{if(FNR==4){nextfile};print;next}  FNR>4 && FNR!=NR' file2.dat file1.dat

Solution 3rd: Using awk and head and tail command's combinations here.

awk 'FNR==1{system("head -n3 file2.dat");next} 1' <(tail -n +4 file1.dat)
0
3

Assuming GNU sed

$ sed '3q' f2 | sed -e '3r /dev/stdin' -e '1,4d' f1
1a
2a
3a
5
6
7
8
9
10
  • sed '3q' f2 gives the first three lines from second file
  • -e '3r /dev/stdin' use stdin data
  • -e '1,4d' delete required lines
  • order is important - first r then d


For small number of lines, you can also use

sed -e '3R f2' -e '3R f2' -e '3R f2' -e '1,4d' f1

R command reads one line at a time


With GNU coreutils, this would probably be better for all/most scenarios

head -n3 f2; tail -n +5 f1
2
  • 1
    Good explanation :-). But I don't think using head -n3 f2 has any significant advantage.
    – sjsam
    Jan 22 '18 at 13:37
  • yeah agree ... and if it becomes significant enough, better to use awk or head+tail combo..
    – Sundeep
    Jan 22 '18 at 14:12
2

awk is your friend

Script

# awk 'NR==FNR && FNR<=3 || NR>FNR && FNR>4' file2 file1

Output

1a
2a
3a
5
6
7
8
9
10

Tips

  • NR - Total number of records processed
  • FNR - Total number of records processed but resets when reading a new file.
  • When a condition evaluates to true and no extra commands are given,awk just prints.

All good :-)

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