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I'm trying to implement a trie but the borrow checker is really giving me a hard time:

struct Node {
    // a trie node
    value: char,
    children: Vec<Node>,
}

impl Node {
    fn add_child(&mut self, value: char) -> &mut Node {
        // adds a child to given node
        let vec: Vec<Node> = Vec::new();
        let node = Node {
            value,
            children: vec,
        };
        self.children.push(node);
        self.children.last_mut().unwrap()
    }

    fn get_child(&mut self, value: char) -> Option<&mut Node> {
        // checks if given node has a child with given value, returns the child if it exists
        for child in self.children.iter_mut() {
            if child.value == value {
                return Some(child);
            }
        }
        None
    }

    fn has_child(&self, value: char) -> bool {
        for child in self.children.iter() {
            if child.value == value {
                return true;
            }
        }
        false
    }

    fn add_word(&mut self, word: String) {
        let mut cursor = self;
        for c in word.chars() {
            match cursor.get_child(c) {
                Some(node) => cursor = node,
                None => cursor = cursor.add_child(c),
            }
        }
        cursor.add_child('~');
    }
}

The add_word method gives these 5 errors:

error[E0499]: cannot borrow `*cursor` as mutable more than once at a time
  --> src/main.rs:41:19
   |
41 |             match cursor.get_child(c) {
   |                   ^^^^^^ mutable borrow starts here in previous iteration of loop
...
47 |     }
   |     - mutable borrow ends here

error[E0506]: cannot assign to `cursor` because it is borrowed
  --> src/main.rs:42:31
   |
41 |             match cursor.get_child(c) {
   |                   ------ borrow of `cursor` occurs here
42 |                 Some(node) => cursor = node,
   |                               ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ assignment to borrowed `cursor` occurs here

error[E0506]: cannot assign to `cursor` because it is borrowed
  --> src/main.rs:43:25
   |
41 |             match cursor.get_child(c) {
   |                   ------ borrow of `cursor` occurs here
42 |                 Some(node) => cursor = node,
43 |                 None => cursor = cursor.add_child(c),
   |                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ assignment to borrowed `cursor` occurs here

error[E0499]: cannot borrow `*cursor` as mutable more than once at a time
  --> src/main.rs:43:34
   |
41 |             match cursor.get_child(c) {
   |                   ------ first mutable borrow occurs here
42 |                 Some(node) => cursor = node,
43 |                 None => cursor = cursor.add_child(c),
   |                                  ^^^^^^ second mutable borrow occurs here
...
47 |     }
   |     - first borrow ends here

error[E0499]: cannot borrow `*cursor` as mutable more than once at a time
  --> src/main.rs:46:9
   |
41 |             match cursor.get_child(c) {
   |                   ------ first mutable borrow occurs here
...
46 |         cursor.add_child('~');
   |         ^^^^^^ second mutable borrow occurs here
47 |     }
   |     - first borrow ends here

This is the Go code that I was trying to translate:

func (n *trieNode) AddWord(word string) {
cursor := n
for i := 0; i < len(word); i++ {
    if cursor.HasChild(byte(word[i])) == nil {
        cursor = cursor.AddChild(byte(word[i]))
    } else {
        cursor = cursor.HasChild(byte(word[i]))
    }
}
// tilde indicates the end of the word
cursor.AddChild(byte('~'))
}
  • Time for NLL :-) – Malice Jan 23 '18 at 11:20
  • Still doesn't compile on nightly with #![feature(nll)]. Not sure if this is a weakness in the current implementation or if the code is subtly incorrect. – trentcl Jan 23 '18 at 11:28
  • 1
    @trentcl I'd say weakness. The block works fine in a separate get_or_add_child(&mut self, value: char) -> &mut Node method (which is also easy to implement without NLL, so I'd recommend going for that - same as in my answer in the linked duplicate). – Stefan Jan 23 '18 at 11:51
  • 1
    @Stefan OK, I've added another duplicate which uses indices to work around it. Seem reasonable? In the future, I recommend solving the problem using the suggested duplicate(s). This lets us be sure that it is a duplicate and then we can paste it in as a comment to help the OP see how it works. – Shepmaster Jan 23 '18 at 15:05
  • 1
    @Shepmaster well with all the help I'm getting at least its community seems amazing! I will keep tinkering with Rust I guess. Also, for years I've tried to make a meaningful contribution to any major FOSS, it'll be very interesting if this problem that I didn't even comprehend fully turns out to affect stuff significantly :) – Sarp Başaraner Jan 23 '18 at 16:10