37

The CoffeeScript docs state that list comprehensions should be able to do the select/filter operations:

They should be able to handle most places where you otherwise would use a loop, each/forEach, map, or select/filter.

You'd imagine you could do something in one line like result = item for item in list if item % 2 == 0 However the closest I can come is

list = [1,2,3,4]
result = []
for item in list
  if item % 2 == 0 then result.push item

Whats the most concise way to filter a list in CoffeeScript?

2 Answers 2

79
result = (item for item in list when item % 2 == 0)

edit : added result =

1
  • 2
    Put that in a function, otherwise, it does nothing. Type it into "Try Coffeescript" in jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script and look at the javascript output.
    – Amir
    Jan 30, 2011 at 3:02
8

Unless you are trying to squeeze every ounce of performance out, I would create a filter function like this:

filter = (list, func) -> x for x in list when func(x)

or if you want to add it to the prototype of every array:

Array::filter = (func) -> x for x in @ when func(x)

and then write: (respectively)

result = filter mylist, (x) -> x % 2 == 0

or

result = mylist.filter (x) -> x % 2 == 0

For reference, this is the javascript that gets generated:

var filter, result;
filter = function(list, func) {
    var x, _i, _len, _results;
    _results = [];
    for (_i = 0, _len = list.length; _i < _len; _i++) {
        x = list[_i];
        if (func(x)) {
            _results.push(x);
        }
    }
    return _results;
};
Array.prototype.filter = function(func) {
    var x, _i, _len, _results;
    _results = [];
    for (_i = 0, _len = this.length; _i < _len; _i++) {
        x = this[_i];
        if (func(x)) {
            _results.push(x);
        }
    }
    return _results;
};
result = filter(mylist, function(x) {
    return x % 2 === 0;
});
result = mylist.filter(function(x) {
    return x % 2 === 0;
});

There is a similar question here

2
  • 1
    Its definitely a matter of personal preference as they both get the job done - but taking python as an example, list comprehensions are generally preferred over functional programming functions when possible since they are considered more readable. Jan 31, 2011 at 1:40
  • 1
    wat. Array already has this exact function… (just maybe more efficient) Oct 10, 2012 at 22:54

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