I run a weekly crontab that collects information and creates a log file.

I have a script that I run against this weekly file to output only specific status lines to my display.

#!/bin/sh

# store newest filename to variable
HW_FILE="$(ls -t /home/user/hwinfo/|head -1)"

# List the Site name, hardware group, Redundancy or Health status', and the site divider
grep -i 'Site\|^\*\*\|^Redundancy\|^Health\|^##' /home/user/hwinfo/$HW_FILE
echo "/home/user/hwinfo/"$HW_FILE
exit 0

This is a sample output:

Accessing Site: site01
** FANS **
Redundancy Status : Full
** MEMORY **
Health : Ok
** CPUs **
Health : Ok
** POWER SUPPLIES **
Redundancy Status : Full
##########################################
Accessing Site: site02
** FANS **
Redundancy Status : Full
** MEMORY **
Health : Degraded
** CPUs **
Health : Ok
** POWER SUPPLIES **
Redundancy Status : Full
##########################################
Accessing Site: site03
** FANS **
Redundancy Status : Failed
** MEMORY **
Health : Ok
** CPUs **
Health : Ok
** POWER SUPPLIES **
Redundancy Status : Full
##########################################
/home/user/hwinfo/hwinfo_102217_034001.txt

Is there a way to cat / grep / sed / awk / perl / the current output so that any lines that begin with either Redundancy or Health, but don't end in Full or Ok, respectively, get colorized?

What I want to see is this

imgur link

I've tried piping the current output to | grep --color=auto \bRedundancy\w*\b(?<!Full)\|\bHealth\w*\b(?<!Ok) without success. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

With any awk in any shell on any UNIX box:

awk -v on="$(tput setaf 1)" -v off="$(tput sgr0)" '$1~/^(Health|Redundancy)$/ && $NF!~/^(Full|Ok)$/{$0 = on $0 off} 1'  file

enter image description here

You should really use a more robust expression with string comparisons though rather than the current loose regexp:

awk -v on="$(tput setaf 1)" -v off="$(tput sgr0)" '
(($1=="Health") && ($NF!="Ok")) || (($1=="Redundancy") && ($NF!="Full")) { $0 = on $0 off }
1'  file

Using GNU grep:

| grep -P --color=auto '^Redundancy.*(?<!Full)$|^Health.*(?<!Ok)$|$'

-P to use PCRE for lookbehind (which I don't think grep supports otherwise), |$ to make it output all lines. You need to use the lookbehind right before the line-end.

  • 3
    Considering adding |$ at the end instead of -C :) – PesaThe Jan 23 at 21:23
  • @PesaThe clever – ysth Jan 23 at 22:08
  • 1
    You should mention that'll only work with GNU grep and that according to the maintainers -P is "highly experimental" (see the man page) so YMMV with using it. It has been known to quit with a core dump. – Ed Morton Jan 23 at 22:21

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