As https://perldoc.perl.org/perlrun.html indicates,

-F option specifies the pattern to split on for -a. The pattern may be surrounded by // , "" , or '' , otherwise it will be put in single quotes. You can't use literal whitespace or NUL characters in the pattern.

I tried below commands on a text, but the result is totally the same.

So what's the difference of these pattern quotation in below example?

$ perl -aF"\|" -lne 'print $F[0]' input
Time
2018-01-11 00:00:00
2018-01-11 00:15:00

$ perl -aF'\|' -lne 'print $F[0]' input
Time
2018-01-11 00:00:00
2018-01-11 00:15:00

$ perl -aF/\|/ -lne 'print $F[0]' input
T
2
2

$ perl -aF"|" -lne 'print $F[0]' input
T
2
2

$ perl -aF'|' -lne 'print $F[0]' input
T
2
2


$ perl -aF/|/ -lne 'print $F[0]' input
bash: /: Is a directory
  • design-patterns end matching patterns are two very different concepts. Tag removed. – choroba Jan 23 at 22:26
  • | is special in the shell. You can't use it unquoted. – choroba Jan 23 at 22:26
  • perl -aF\\\| ... also works. – mob Jan 23 at 23:07
  • -F/\|/ causes your shell to pass -F/|/ to perl. – ikegami Jan 24 at 16:32

There are three layers of interpretation you need to consider.

The first layer is the shell. The second layer is perl's syntax for string/regex literals. The third layer is perl's regex syntax.

Let's go through your examples, one by one:


"\|" and '\|' both pass a two-character string (\|) to perl (" and ' are interpreted by the shell). That's layer one.

\| is not surrounded by quotes, so perl adds '' around it, forming the string '\|' (as in split '\|', $_). Perl's single-quoted strings don't treat backslash specially (unless it's followed by \ or '), so perl thinks it's still a two-character string, \|. That's layer two.

split interprets its first argument as a regex. \ has a special meaning in a regex: It escapes the following character. Thus the regex \| matches a single | (pipe character), and that's why this code splits its input on |. That's layer three.


/\|/ passes the three-character string /|/ to perl (\ is interpreted by the shell). That's layer one.

/|/ looks like something (|) surrounded by //, so perl adds nothing (split /|/, $_). This is parsed as a regex literal and nothing special happens here: There's a single |. That's layer two.

| has a special meaning in a regex (unless escaped by \): A|B means "match either A or B". In this case both A and B are empty, matching the empty string. Splitting on a pattern that matches the empty string results in a list of all the characters in the input string (effectively, the input string is split everywhere (at every character boundary)). That's layer three.


"|" and '|' both pass a one-character string (|) to perl (" and ' are interpreted by the shell).

| is not surrounded by quotes, so perl adds '' around it, forming the string '|' (as in split '|', $_). This is a simple one-character string (still just |). That's layer two.

split interprets its first argument as a regex, and as in the previous case, | has a special meaning ("or"), resulting in a list of single-character elements. That's layer three.


| (outside of quotes and not escaped by \) is a special character in the shell: It creates a pipeline.

perl -aF/|/ -lne 'print $F[0]' input

is the same as

perl -aF/ | / -lne 'print $F[0]' input

and means: Run perl -aF/ and pipe its output into the command / -lne 'print $F[0]' input. This causes an error because / is not a valid program, it's a directory.

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