7

This question already has an answer here:

I'm new using Autofac so my apologies for the noob question. I read every manual in Internet explaining the basics when using Autofac (or any other tool like Structuremap, Unity, etc). But all the examples that I found are basics. I need to know how to implement Autofac deeper in my code. Let me try to explain what I need to know with this example, a console application.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var container = BuildContainer();
        var employeeService = container.Resolve<EmployeeService>();
        Employee employee = new Employee
        {
            EmployeeId = 1,
            FirstName = "Peter",
            LastName = "Parker",
            Designation = "Photographer"
        };

        employeeService.Print(employee);
    }

    static IContainer BuildContainer()
    {
        var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
        builder.RegisterType<EmployeeRepository>().As<IEmployeeRepository>();
        builder.RegisterType<EmployeeService>();
        return builder.Build();
    }
}

This is simple and easy. What I'm trying to figure out is how do you implement this when you go deeper in the code. In this example, when you execute this line

employeeService.Print(employee);

Let's assume the "Print" method is a little bit complex and need to use another dependencies/classes to accomplish his task. We are still using Autofac so I suppose we need to do something like the example above to create that dependencies. Is that correct? Inside my "print" method, when I need to use another class, I must create another container, fill it, use it with Resolve() and so on? There is an easier way to do that? A static class with all the dependencies needed can be consumed across all the solution? How? I hope to be clear. Maybe neither I can express what I need. :( Sorry for my poor English. I'm still learning it while I learn Autofac.

marked as duplicate by NightOwl888, Steven c# Jan 24 '18 at 13:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • It looks like you're on track. Your EmployeeService requires an IEmployeeRepository, so you registered that. If EmployeeService depends on something else that is injected into its constructor, then you just register that with the same container alongside the two registrations you already have. When you resolve EmployeeService the container will resolve whatever it needs to, even if those classes have dependencies, and so do those classes, and so one, as long as the types are all registered. That's what makes it so awesome. – Scott Hannen Jan 24 '18 at 0:48
  • @NightOwl888 my problem goes a little bit further than this. I need to know what happens when you have to create dependencies in subproceses that depends on Main(). – Sebastian Garcia Jan 24 '18 at 0:52
  • 1
    You don't. The DI container does that. You just register them with autofac, and it will resolve the entire object graph of the application in one go. – NightOwl888 Jan 24 '18 at 4:35
  • @SebastianGarcia - I updated the "duplicate of" answer to make it a bit more clear how it works. In your case you would accept EmployeeService in the ApplicationLogic constructor and move the creation of Employee and the call to employeeService.Print(employee) to the ApplicationLogic.Run() method. Of course, injecting interfaces instead of concrete types (as pointed out in the answers below) is also good advice. – NightOwl888 Jan 25 '18 at 19:43
  • @NightOwl888 thank you. Now the solution you point me is more clear and I can understand it better. Thanks again! – Sebastian Garcia Jan 25 '18 at 22:51
25

Static is the problem

The main issue with a console program is that the main Program class is mostly static. This is not good for unit testing and it's not good for IoC; a static class is never constructed, for example, so there is no chance for constructor injection. As a result, you end up using new in the main code base, or pull instances from the IoC container, which is a violation of the pattern (it's more of a service locator pattern at that point). We can get out of this mess by returning to practice of putting our code in instance methods, which means we need an object instance of something. But what something?

A two-class pattern

I follow a particular, lightweight pattern when writing a console app. You're welcome to follow this pattern which works pretty well for me.

The pattern involves two classes:

  1. The original Program class, which is static, very brief, and excluded from code coverage. This class acts as a "pass through" from O/S invocation to invocation of the application proper.
  2. An instanced Application class, which is fully injected and unit-testable. This is where your real code should live.

The Program Class

The O/S requires a Main entry point, and it has to be static. The Program class exists only to meet this requirement.

Keep your static program very clean; it should contain (1) the composition root and (2) a simple, "pass-through" entry point that calls the real application (which is instanced, as we will see).

None of the code in Program is worthy of unit testing, since all it does is compose the object graph (which would be different when under test anyway) and call the main entry point for the application. And by sequestering the non-unit-testable code, you can now exclude the entire class from code coverage (using the ExcludeFromCodeCoverageAttribute).

Here is an example:

[ExcludeFromCodeCoverage]
static class Program
{
    private static IContainer CompositionRoot()
    {
        var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
        builder.RegisterType<Application>();
        builder.RegisterType<EmployeeService>().As<IEmployeeService>();
        builder.RegisterType<PrintService>().As<IPrintService>();
        return builder.Build();
    }

    public static void Main()  //Main entry point
    {
        CompositionRoot().Resolve<Application>().Run();
    }
}

As you can see, extremely simple.

The Application class

Now to implement your Application class as if it were the One and Only Program. Only now, because it is instanced, you can inject dependencies per the usual pattern.

class Application
{
    protected readonly IEmployeeService _employeeService;
    protected readonly IPrintService _printService;

    public Application(IEmployeeService employeeService, IPrintService printService)
    {
        _employeeService = employeeService; //Injected
        _printService = printService; //Injected
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        var employee = _employeeService.GetEmployee();
        _printService.Print(employee);
    }
}

This approach keeps separation of concerns, avoids too much static "stuff," and lets you follow the IoC pattern without too much bother. And you'll notice-- my code example doesn't contain a single instance of the new keyword, except to instantiate a ContainerBuilder.

What if the dependencies have dependencies of their own?

Because we follow this pattern, if PrintService or EmployeeService have their own dependencies, the container will now take care of it all. You don't have to instantiate or write any code to get those services injected, as long as you register them under the appropriate interface in the composition root.

class EmployeeService : IEmployeeService
{
    protected readonly IPrintService _printService;

    public EmployeeService(IPrintService printService)
    {
        _printService = printService; //injected
    }

    public void Print(Employee employee)
    {
        _printService.Print(employee.ToString());
    }
}

This way the container takes care of everything and you don't have to write any code, just register your types and interfaces.

  • 1
    Thanks. This show me how I must do it. Thanks again for your time and great explanation. – Sebastian Garcia Jan 24 '18 at 14:35
0

The idea is that you register all of your dependencies on startup and you can then resolve them later. You look like you're almost there, just a few changes:

class Program
{
    // Declare your container as a static variable so it can be referenced later
    static IContainer Container { get; set; }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Assign the container to the static IContainer
        Container = BuildContainer();
        var employeeService = container.Resolve<EmployeeService>();
        Employee employee = new Employee
        {
            EmployeeId = 1,
            FirstName = "Peter",
            LastName = "Parker",
            Designation = "Photographer"
        };

        employeeService.Print(employee);
    }

    static IContainer BuildContainer()
    {
        var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
        builder.RegisterType<EmployeeRepository>().As<IEmployeeRepository>();
        builder.RegisterType<EmployeeService>();
        return builder.Build();
    }
}

Then you can resolve it later eg. in employeeService.Print() function:

public void Print(Employee employee)
{
        // Create the scope, resolve your EmployeeRepository,
        // use it, then dispose of the scope.
        using (var scope = Container.BeginLifetimeScope())
        {
            var repository = scope.Resolve<IEmployeeRepository>();
            repository.Update(employee);
        }
}

This is a slight adaptation of the code (to fit with your code) from the official getting started guide

0

You can use inject dependencies via constructor (Autofac also supports property and method injection).

Usually when dependency registration is done, you should not use container inside classes, as it makes your class to be coupled to container, there could be some cases that you want to use child container (inner scope) in which you can define a specific class which does that and make your code independent of container.

In your example you just need to resolve IEmployeeService and all its dependencies will be resolved by container automatically.

Here is an example to demonstrate how you can achieve this:

using Autofac;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace AutofacExample
{
    public class Employee
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public interface IEmployeeRepository
    {
        Employee FindById(int id);
    }

    public interface IEmployeeService
    {
        void Print(int employeeId);
    }

    public class EmployeeRepository : IEmployeeRepository
    {
        private readonly List<Employee> _data = new List<Employee>()
        {
            new Employee { Id = 1, Name = "Employee 1"},
            new Employee { Id = 2, Name = "Employee 2"},
        };
        public Employee FindById(int id)
        {
            return _data.SingleOrDefault(e => e.Id == id);
        }
    }

    public class EmployeeService : IEmployeeService
    {
        private readonly IEmployeeRepository _repository;
        public EmployeeService(IEmployeeRepository repository)
        {
            _repository = repository;
        }
        public void Print(int employeeId)
        {
            var employee = _repository.FindById(employeeId);
            if (employee != null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"Id:{employee.Id}, Name:{employee.Name}");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"Employee with Id:{employeeId} not found.");
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var container = BuildContainer();
            var employeeSerive = container.Resolve<IEmployeeService>();
            employeeSerive.Print(1);
            employeeSerive.Print(2);
            employeeSerive.Print(3);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static IContainer BuildContainer()
        {
            var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
            builder.RegisterType<EmployeeRepository>()
                   .As<IEmployeeRepository>()
                   .InstancePerDependency();
            builder.RegisterType<EmployeeService>()
                   .As<IEmployeeService>()
                   .InstancePerDependency();
            return builder.Build();
        }
    }
}
0

Suppose you have your EmployeeService class, and it needs some other class to be able to print:

public class EmployeeService 
{
    private readonly IEmployeeRepository _employeeRepository;
    private readonly IEmployeePrinter _printer;

    public EmployeeService(IEmployeeRepository employeeRepository, 
        IEmployeePrinter printer)
    {
        _employeeRepository = employeeRepository;
        _printer = printer;
    }
    public void PrintEmployee(Employee employee)
    {
        _printer.PrintEmployee(employee);
    }
}

And then you have an implementation of IEmployeePrinter, and it has still more dependencies:

public class EmployeePrinter : IEmployeePrinter
{
    private readonly IEmployeePrintFormatter _printFormatter;

    public EmployeePrinter(IEmployeePrintFormatter printFormatter)
    {
        _printFormatter = printFormatter;
    }

    public void PrintEmployee(Employee employee)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

You don't need more containers. All you have to do is register each type with the one container, pretty much just as you've done:

static IContainer BuildContainer()
{
    var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
    builder.RegisterType<EmployeeRepository>().As<IEmployeeRepository>();
    builder.RegisterType<EmployeePrinter>().As<IEmployeePrinter>();
    builder.RegisterType<SomeEmployeeFormatter>().As<IEmployeePrintFormatter>();
    builder.RegisterType<EmployeeService>();
    return builder.Build();
}

When you call Resolve<EmployeeService>() it will see that it needs an IEmployeeRepository and an IEmployeePrinter. So behind the scenes it will call Resolve<IEmployeeRepository>() and Resolve<IEmployeePrinter>(). Then it sees that EmployeePrinter requires an IEmployeePrintFormatter, so it resolves that too.

It works as long as you've registered everything that needs to be resolved. It's great because it allows you to continually break down your development into smaller classes that are easy to test. This will result in a bunch of nested classes that would be really hard to work with if you had to create them like this:

var service = new EmployeeService(
    new EmployeeRespository("connectionString"),
    new EmployeePrinter(new SomeEmployeeformatter()));

But the container makes it so that you don't have to worry about creating all of those classes, even if they get nested many levels deep.

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