45

My input is a list of lists. Some of them share common elements, eg.

L = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]

I need to merge all lists, that share a common element, and repeat this procedure as long as there are no more lists with the same item. I thought about using boolean operations and a while loop, but couldn't come up with a good solution.

The final result should be:

L = [['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','o','p'],['k']] 
  • 5
    What do you mean by merge? Union? Can you show the result you expect for your example data? – Mark Byers Jan 30 '11 at 11:23
  • Simplified solution for length 2 sublists (and more) – yatu Apr 5 at 7:11

14 Answers 14

45

You can see your list as a notation for a Graph, ie ['a','b','c'] is a graph with 3 nodes connected to each other. The problem you are trying to solve is finding connected components in this graph.

You can use NetworkX for this, which has the advantage that it's pretty much guaranteed to be correct:

l = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]

import networkx 
from networkx.algorithms.components.connected import connected_components


def to_graph(l):
    G = networkx.Graph()
    for part in l:
        # each sublist is a bunch of nodes
        G.add_nodes_from(part)
        # it also imlies a number of edges:
        G.add_edges_from(to_edges(part))
    return G

def to_edges(l):
    """ 
        treat `l` as a Graph and returns it's edges 
        to_edges(['a','b','c','d']) -> [(a,b), (b,c),(c,d)]
    """
    it = iter(l)
    last = next(it)

    for current in it:
        yield last, current
        last = current    

G = to_graph(l)
print connected_components(G)
# prints [['a', 'c', 'b', 'e', 'd', 'g', 'f', 'o', 'p'], ['k']]

To solve this efficiently yourself you have to convert the list into something graph-ish anyways, so you might as well use networkX from the start.

| improve this answer | |
  • Actually I need this to create graphs afterwards. – Wistful Jesus Jan 30 '11 at 17:25
  • 4
    @Wistful Jesus: All the more reason to use the library. – Jochen Ritzel Jan 30 '11 at 18:24
  • 2
    Cool answer. As a small suggestion to make it even shorter, the to_edges function could be replaced by izip(part[:-1], part[1:]). – mtth Feb 17 '13 at 2:03
  • 1
    What is the time complexity of connect_components? – Shirish Kumar Oct 4 '16 at 17:19
33

Algorithm:

  1. take first set A from list
  2. for each other set B in the list do if B has common element(s) with A join B into A; remove B from list
  3. repeat 2. until no more overlap with A
  4. put A into outpup
  5. repeat 1. with rest of list

So you might want to use sets instead of list. The following program should do it.

l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['b', 'd', 'e'], ['k'], ['o', 'p'], ['e', 'f'], ['p', 'a'], ['d', 'g']]

out = []
while len(l)>0:
    first, *rest = l
    first = set(first)

    lf = -1
    while len(first)>lf:
        lf = len(first)

        rest2 = []
        for r in rest:
            if len(first.intersection(set(r)))>0:
                first |= set(r)
            else:
                rest2.append(r)     
        rest = rest2

    out.append(first)
    l = rest

print(out)
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I like this answer. To me, the question feels like a set problem. One small point: the elegant first, *rest = l construct is Python 3 only, swapping it with first, rest = l[0], l[1:] seems to work fine on python 2.7 – Simon Whitaker Jan 30 '11 at 14:32
6

I came across the same issue of trying to merge down lists with common values. This example may be what you are looking for. It only loops over lists once and updates resultset as it goes.

lists = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]
lists = sorted([sorted(x) for x in lists]) #Sorts lists in place so you dont miss things. Trust me, needs to be done.

resultslist = [] #Create the empty result list.

if len(lists) >= 1: # If your list is empty then you dont need to do anything.
    resultlist = [lists[0]] #Add the first item to your resultset
    if len(lists) > 1: #If there is only one list in your list then you dont need to do anything.
        for l in lists[1:]: #Loop through lists starting at list 1
            listset = set(l) #Turn you list into a set
            merged = False #Trigger
            for index in range(len(resultlist)): #Use indexes of the list for speed.
                rset = set(resultlist[index]) #Get list from you resultset as a set
                if len(listset & rset) != 0: #If listset and rset have a common value then the len will be greater than 1
                    resultlist[index] = list(listset | rset) #Update the resultlist with the updated union of listset and rset
                    merged = True #Turn trigger to True
                    break #Because you found a match there is no need to continue the for loop.
            if not merged: #If there was no match then add the list to the resultset, so it doesnt get left out.
                resultlist.append(l)
print resultlist

#

resultset = [['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'g', 'f', 'o', 'p'], ['k']]
| improve this answer | |
  • this algo is not correct man ! if the list is something like that [[0, 2], [1, 8], [1, 4], [2, 8], [2, 6], [3, 5], [6, 9]] then the result will be 3 sub list instead of 2 sub list. – Anirban Bhui Jan 26 '17 at 8:20
  • @anirbanBhui this has since been fixed – duhaime Jun 10 '18 at 14:31
  • could you add another condition checking whether the today is Wednesday? I would only merge on Wednesdays. – Viktor Tóth May 14 at 21:19
6

I think this can be solved by modelling the problem as a graph. Each sublist is a node and shares an edge with another node only if the two sublists have some element in common. Thus, a merged sublist is basically a connected component in the graph. Merging all of them is simply a matter of finding all connected components and listing them.

This can be done by a simple traversal over the graph. Both BFS and DFS can be used, but I'm using DFS here since it is somewhat shorter for me.

l = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]
taken=[False]*len(l)
l=[set(elem) for elem in l]

def dfs(node,index):
    taken[index]=True
    ret=node
    for i,item in enumerate(l):
        if not taken[i] and not ret.isdisjoint(item):
            ret.update(dfs(item,i))
    return ret

def merge_all():
    ret=[]
    for i,node in enumerate(l):
        if not taken[i]:
            ret.append(list(dfs(node,i)))
    return ret

print(merge_all())
| improve this answer | |
  • @duhaime: Can you share a case for which this fails? – MAK Jul 15 '18 at 7:00
  • @duhaime: Can you please share a case for which this fails in Python 3.5? – MAK Nov 8 '18 at 8:18
  • it seems the OP expected L = [['a','b','c','d','e','f','g','o','p'],['k']] but in 3.5.3 this code prints [['a', 'c', 'b', 'p']]. Perhaps I'm missing something? My post above runs random tests with different inputs, so you could check that too... – duhaime Nov 8 '18 at 12:15
  • 1
    @duhaime:Thanks! Updated the code to work on Python 3.5. – MAK Nov 12 '18 at 21:20
5

As Jochen Ritzel pointed out you are looking for connected components in a graph. Here is how you could implement it without using a graph library:

from collections import defaultdict

def connected_components(lists):
    neighbors = defaultdict(set)
    seen = set()
    for each in lists:
        for item in each:
            neighbors[item].update(each)
    def component(node, neighbors=neighbors, seen=seen, see=seen.add):
        nodes = set([node])
        next_node = nodes.pop
        while nodes:
            node = next_node()
            see(node)
            nodes |= neighbors[node] - seen
            yield node
    for node in neighbors:
        if node not in seen:
            yield sorted(component(node))

L = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]
print list(connected_components(L))
| improve this answer | |
3

I needed to perform the clustering technique described by the OP millions of times for rather large lists, and therefore wanted to determine which of the methods suggested above is both most accurate and most performant.

I ran 10 trials for input lists sized from 2^1 through 2^10 for each method above, using the same input list for each method, and measured the average runtime for each algorithm proposed above in milliseconds. Here are the results:

enter image description here

These results helped me see that of the methods that consistently return correct results, @jochen's is the fastest. Among those methods that don't consistently return correct results, mak's solution often does not include all of the input elements (i.e. list of list members are missing), and the solutions of braaksma, cmangla, and asterisk are not guaranteed to be maximally merged.

It's interesting that the two fastest, correct algorithms have the top two amount of upvotes to date, in properly ranked order.

Here's the code used to run the tests:

from networkx.algorithms.components.connected import connected_components
from itertools import chain
from random import randint, random
from collections import defaultdict, deque
from copy import deepcopy
from multiprocessing import Pool
import networkx
import datetime
import os

##
# @mimomu
##

def mimomu(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  s = set(chain.from_iterable(l))
  for i in s:
    components = [x for x in l if i in x]
    for j in components:
      l.remove(j)
    l += [list(set(chain.from_iterable(components)))]
  return l

##
# @Howard
##

def howard(l):
  out = []
  while len(l)>0:
      first, *rest = l
      first = set(first)

      lf = -1
      while len(first)>lf:
          lf = len(first)

          rest2 = []
          for r in rest:
              if len(first.intersection(set(r)))>0:
                  first |= set(r)
              else:
                  rest2.append(r)
          rest = rest2

      out.append(first)
      l = rest
  return out

##
# Nx @Jochen Ritzel
##

def jochen(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)

  def to_graph(l):
      G = networkx.Graph()
      for part in l:
          # each sublist is a bunch of nodes
          G.add_nodes_from(part)
          # it also imlies a number of edges:
          G.add_edges_from(to_edges(part))
      return G

  def to_edges(l):
      """
          treat `l` as a Graph and returns it's edges
          to_edges(['a','b','c','d']) -> [(a,b), (b,c),(c,d)]
      """
      it = iter(l)
      last = next(it)

      for current in it:
          yield last, current
          last = current

  G = to_graph(l)
  return list(connected_components(G))

##
# Merge all @MAK
##

def mak(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  taken=[False]*len(l)
  l=map(set,l)

  def dfs(node,index):
      taken[index]=True
      ret=node
      for i,item in enumerate(l):
          if not taken[i] and not ret.isdisjoint(item):
              ret.update(dfs(item,i))
      return ret

  def merge_all():
      ret=[]
      for i,node in enumerate(l):
          if not taken[i]:
              ret.append(list(dfs(node,i)))
      return ret

  result = list(merge_all())
  return result

##
# @cmangla
##

def cmangla(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  len_l = len(l)
  i = 0
  while i < (len_l - 1):
    for j in range(i + 1, len_l):
      # i,j iterate over all pairs of l's elements including new
      # elements from merged pairs. We use len_l because len(l)
      # may change as we iterate
      i_set = set(l[i])
      j_set = set(l[j])

      if len(i_set.intersection(j_set)) > 0:
        # Remove these two from list
        l.pop(j)
        l.pop(i)

        # Merge them and append to the orig. list
        ij_union = list(i_set.union(j_set))
        l.append(ij_union)

        # len(l) has changed
        len_l -= 1

        # adjust 'i' because elements shifted
        i -= 1

        # abort inner loop, continue with next l[i]
        break

      i += 1
  return l

##
# @pillmuncher
##

def pillmuncher(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)

  def connected_components(lists):
    neighbors = defaultdict(set)
    seen = set()
    for each in lists:
        for item in each:
            neighbors[item].update(each)
    def component(node, neighbors=neighbors, seen=seen, see=seen.add):
        nodes = set([node])
        next_node = nodes.pop
        while nodes:
            node = next_node()
            see(node)
            nodes |= neighbors[node] - seen
            yield node
    for node in neighbors:
        if node not in seen:
            yield sorted(component(node))

  return list(connected_components(l))

##
# @NicholasBraaksma
##

def braaksma(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  lists = sorted([sorted(x) for x in l]) #Sorts lists in place so you dont miss things. Trust me, needs to be done.

  resultslist = [] #Create the empty result list.

  if len(lists) >= 1: # If your list is empty then you dont need to do anything.
      resultlist = [lists[0]] #Add the first item to your resultset
      if len(lists) > 1: #If there is only one list in your list then you dont need to do anything.
          for l in lists[1:]: #Loop through lists starting at list 1
              listset = set(l) #Turn you list into a set
              merged = False #Trigger
              for index in range(len(resultlist)): #Use indexes of the list for speed.
                  rset = set(resultlist[index]) #Get list from you resultset as a set
                  if len(listset & rset) != 0: #If listset and rset have a common value then the len will be greater than 1
                      resultlist[index] = list(listset | rset) #Update the resultlist with the updated union of listset and rset
                      merged = True #Turn trigger to True
                      break #Because you found a match there is no need to continue the for loop.
              if not merged: #If there was no match then add the list to the resultset, so it doesnt get left out.
                  resultlist.append(l)
  return resultlist

##
# @Rumple Stiltskin
##

def stiltskin(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  hashdict = defaultdict(int)

  def hashit(x, y):
      for i in y: x[i] += 1
      return x

  def merge(x, y):
      sums = sum([hashdict[i] for i in y])
      if sums > len(y):
          x[0] = x[0].union(y)
      else:
          x[1] = x[1].union(y)
      return x

  hashdict = reduce(hashit, l, hashdict)
  sets = reduce(merge, l, [set(),set()])
  return list(sets)

##
# @Asterisk
##

def asterisk(l):
  l = deepcopy(l)
  results = {}
  for sm in ['min', 'max']:
    sort_method = min if sm == 'min' else max
    l = sorted(l, key=lambda x:sort_method(x))
    queue = deque(l)

    grouped = []
    while len(queue) >= 2:
      l1 = queue.popleft()
      l2 = queue.popleft()
      s1 = set(l1)
      s2 = set(l2)

      if s1 & s2:
        queue.appendleft(s1 | s2)
      else:
        grouped.append(s1)
        queue.appendleft(s2)
    if queue:
      grouped.append(queue.pop())
    results[sm] = grouped
  if len(results['min']) < len(results['max']):
    return results['min']
  return results['max']

##
# Validate no more clusters can be merged
##

def validate(output, L):
  # validate all sublists are maximally merged
  d = defaultdict(list)
  for idx, i in enumerate(output):
    for j in i:
      d[j].append(i)
  if any([len(i) > 1 for i in d.values()]):
    return 'not maximally merged'
  # validate all items in L are accounted for
  all_items = set(chain.from_iterable(L))
  accounted_items = set(chain.from_iterable(output))
  if all_items != accounted_items:
    return 'missing items'
  # validate results are good
  return 'true'

##
# Timers
##

def time(func, L):
  start = datetime.datetime.now()
  result = func(L)
  delta = datetime.datetime.now() - start
  return result, delta

##
# Function runner
##

def run_func(args):
  func, L, input_size = args
  results, elapsed = time(func, L)
  validation_result = validate(results, L)
  return func.__name__, input_size, elapsed, validation_result

##
# Main
##

all_results = defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(list))
funcs = [mimomu, howard, jochen, mak, cmangla, braaksma, asterisk]
args = []

for trial in range(10):
  for s in range(10):
    input_size = 2**s

    # get some random inputs to use for all trials at this size
    L = []
    for i in range(input_size):
      sublist = []
      for j in range(randint(5, 10)):
        sublist.append(randint(0, 2**24))
      L.append(sublist)
    for i in funcs:
      args.append([i, L, input_size])

pool = Pool()
for result in pool.imap(run_func, args):
  func_name, input_size, elapsed, validation_result = result
  all_results[func_name][input_size].append({
    'time': elapsed,
    'validation': validation_result,
  })
  # show the running time for the function at this input size
  print(input_size, func_name, elapsed, validation_result)
pool.close()
pool.join()

# write the average of time trials at each size for each function
with open('times.tsv', 'w') as out:
  for func in all_results:
    validations = [i['validation'] for j in all_results[func] for i in all_results[func][j]]
    linetype = 'incorrect results' if any([i != 'true' for i in validations]) else 'correct results'

    for input_size in all_results[func]:
      all_times = [i['time'].microseconds for i in all_results[func][input_size]]
      avg_time = sum(all_times) / len(all_times)

      out.write(func + '\t' + str(input_size) + '\t' + \
        str(avg_time) + '\t' + linetype + '\n')

And for plotting:

library(ggplot2)
df <- read.table('times.tsv', sep='\t')

p <- ggplot(df, aes(x=V2, y=V3, color=as.factor(V1))) +
  geom_line() +
  xlab('number of input lists') +
  ylab('runtime (ms)') +
  labs(color='') +
  scale_x_continuous(trans='log10') +
  facet_wrap(~V4, ncol=1)

ggsave('runtimes.png')
| improve this answer | |
3

You can use networkx library because is a graph theory and connected components problem:

import networkx as nx

L = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]

G = nx.Graph()

#Add nodes to Graph    
G.add_nodes_from(sum(L, []))

#Create edges from list of nodes
q = [[(s[i],s[i+1]) for i in range(len(s)-1)] for s in L]

for i in q:

    #Add edges to Graph
    G.add_edges_from(i)

#Find all connnected components in graph and list nodes for each component
[list(i) for i in nx.connected_components(G)]

Output:

[['p', 'c', 'f', 'g', 'o', 'a', 'd', 'b', 'e'], ['k']]
| improve this answer | |
2

My attempt. Has functional look to it.

#!/usr/bin/python
from collections import defaultdict
l = [['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]
hashdict = defaultdict(int)

def hashit(x, y):
    for i in y: x[i] += 1
    return x

def merge(x, y):
    sums = sum([hashdict[i] for i in y])
    if sums > len(y):
        x[0] = x[0].union(y)
    else:
        x[1] = x[1].union(y)
    return x


hashdict = reduce(hashit, l, hashdict)
sets = reduce(merge, l, [set(),set()])
print [list(sets[0]), list(sets[1])]
| improve this answer | |
2

I have found itertools a fast option for merging lists and it solved this problem for me:

import itertools

LL = set(itertools.chain.from_iterable(L)) 
# LL is {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'k', 'o', 'p'}

for each in LL:
  components = [x for x in L if each in x]
  for i in components:
    L.remove(i)
  L += [list(set(itertools.chain.from_iterable(components)))]

# then L = [['k'], ['a', 'c', 'b', 'e', 'd', 'g', 'f', 'o', 'p']]

For large sets sorting LL by frequency from the most common elements to the least can speed things up a bit

| improve this answer | |
2

I miss a non quirurgic version. I post it on 2018 (7 years later)

An easy and understable approach:

1) make cartesian product ( cross join ) merging both if elements in common
2) remove dups

#your list
l=[['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']]

#import itertools
from itertools import product, groupby

#inner lists to sets (to list of sets)
l=[set(x) for x in l]

#cartesian product merging elements if some element in common
for a,b in product(l,l):
    if a.intersection( b ):
       a.update(b)
       b.update(a)

#back to list of lists
l = sorted( [sorted(list(x)) for x in l])

#remove dups
list(l for l,_ in groupby(l))

#result
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'o', 'p'], ['k']]
| improve this answer | |
1

This is a fairly fast solution with no dependencies. It works as follows:

  1. Assign a unique reference number to each of your subsists (in this case, the initial index of the sublist)

  2. Create a dictionary of the reference elements for each sublist, and for each item in each sublist.

  3. Repeat the following procedure until it causes no changes:

    3a. Go through each item in each sublist. If that item's current reference number is different from the reference number of its sublist, then the element must be part of two lists. Merge the two lists (removing the current sublist from the reference) and set the reference number of all items in the current sublist to be the reference number of the new sublist.

When this procedure causes no changes, it is because all elements are part of exactly one list. Since working set is decreasing in size on every iteration, the algorithm necessarily terminates.

   def merge_overlapping_sublists(lst):
    output, refs = {}, {}
    for index, sublist in enumerate(lst):
        output[index] = set(sublist)
        for elem in sublist:
            refs[elem] = index
    changes = True
    while changes:
        changes = False
        for ref_num, sublist in list(output.items()):
            for elem in sublist:
                current_ref_num = refs[elem]
                if current_ref_num != ref_num:
                    changes = True
                    output[current_ref_num] |= sublist
                    for elem2 in sublist:
                        refs[elem2] = current_ref_num
                    output.pop(ref_num)
                    break
    return list(output.values())

Here are a set of tests for this code:

def compare(a, b):
    a = list(b)
    try:
        for elem in a:
            b.remove(elem)
    except ValueError:
        return False
    return not b

import random
lst = [["a", "b"], ["b", "c"], ["c", "d"], ["d", "e"]]
random.shuffle(lst)
assert compare(merge_overlapping_sublists(lst), [{"a", "b", "c", "d", "e"}])
lst = [["a", "b"], ["b", "c"], ["f", "d"], ["d", "e"]]
random.shuffle(lst)
assert compare(merge_overlapping_sublists(lst), [{"a", "b", "c",}, {"d", "e", "f"}])
lst = [["a", "b"], ["k", "c"], ["f", "g"], ["d", "e"]]
random.shuffle(lst)
assert compare(merge_overlapping_sublists(lst), [{"a", "b"}, {"k", "c"}, {"f", "g"}, {"d", "e"}])
lst = [["a", "b", "c"], ["b", "d", "e"], ["k"], ["o", "p"], ["e", "f"], ["p", "a"], ["d", "g"]]
random.shuffle(lst)
assert compare(merge_overlapping_sublists(lst), [{"k"}, {"a", "c", "b", "e", "d", "g", "f", "o", "p"}])    
lst = [["a", "b"], ["b", "c"], ["a"], ["a"], ["b"]]
random.shuffle(lst)
assert compare(merge_overlapping_sublists(lst), [{"a", "b", "c"}])

Note that the return value is a list of sets.

| improve this answer | |
0

Without knowing quite what you want, I decided to just guess you meant: I want to find every element just once.

#!/usr/bin/python


def clink(l, acc):
  for sub in l:
    if sub.__class__ == list:
      clink(sub, acc)
    else:
      acc[sub]=1

def clunk(l):
  acc = {}
  clink(l, acc)
  print acc.keys()

l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['b', 'd', 'e'], ['k'], ['o', 'p'], ['e', 'f'], ['p', 'a'], ['d', 'g']]

clunk(l)

Output looks like:

['a', 'c', 'b', 'e', 'd', 'g', 'f', 'k', 'o', 'p']
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    .__class__ == list looks so incredibly wrong. At the very least, isinstance(sub, list). If only as a matter of principle. (Also, you could/should just use a set instead of a dict with bogus values.) – user395760 Jan 30 '11 at 12:23
  • @delnan, guilty on both counts :) – sarnold Jan 30 '11 at 12:25
  • Also k shouldn't be connected to other components per the OP's question – duhaime Jun 9 '18 at 21:22
  • @duhaime, heh, the edit that added that requirement was added after I posted my answer. It's instructive that instead of answering the question I should have asked the poster to write a better question first. Thanks. – sarnold Jun 11 '18 at 18:43
0

This is perhaps a simpler/faster algorithm and seems to work well -

l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['b', 'd', 'e'], ['k'], ['o', 'p'], ['e', 'f'], ['p', 'a'], ['d', 'g']]

len_l = len(l)
i = 0
while i < (len_l - 1):
    for j in range(i + 1, len_l):

        # i,j iterate over all pairs of l's elements including new 
        # elements from merged pairs. We use len_l because len(l)
        # may change as we iterate
        i_set = set(l[i])
        j_set = set(l[j])

        if len(i_set.intersection(j_set)) > 0:
            # Remove these two from list
            l.pop(j)
            l.pop(i)

            # Merge them and append to the orig. list
            ij_union = list(i_set.union(j_set))
            l.append(ij_union)

            # len(l) has changed
            len_l -= 1

            # adjust 'i' because elements shifted
            i -= 1

            # abort inner loop, continue with next l[i]
            break

    i += 1

print l
# prints [['k'], ['a', 'c', 'b', 'e', 'd', 'g', 'f', 'o', 'p']]
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0

Simply speaking, you can use quick-find.

The key is to use two temporary list. The first is called elements, which stores all elements existing in all groups. The second is named labels. I got the inspiration from sklearn's kmeans algorithm. 'labels' stores the labels or the centroids of the elements. Here I simply let the first element in the cluster be the centroid. Initially, the values are from 0 to length-1, ascendingly.

For each group, I get their 'indices' in 'elements'. I then get the labels for group according to indices. And I calculate the min of the labels, that will be the new label for them. I replace all elements with labels in labels for group with the new label.

Or to say, for each iteration, I try to combine two or more existing groups. If the group has labels of 0 and 2 I find out the new label 0, that is the min of the two. I than replace them with 0.

def cluser_combine(groups):
    n_groups=len(groups)

    #first, we put all elements appeared in 'gruops' into 'elements'.
    elements=list(set.union(*[set(g) for g in groups]))
    #and sort elements.
    elements.sort()
    n_elements=len(elements)

    #I create a list called clusters, this is the key of this algorithm.
    #I was inspired by sklearn kmeans implementation.
    #they have an attribute called labels_
    #the url is here:
    #https://scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/generated/sklearn.cluster.KMeans.html
    #i called this algorithm cluster combine, because of this inspiration.
    labels=list(range(n_elements))


    #for each group, I get their 'indices' in 'elements'
    #I then get the labels for indices.
    #and i calculate the min of the labels, that will be the new label for them.
    #I replace all elements with labels in labels_for_group with the new label.

    #or to say, for each iteration,
    #i try to combine two or more existing groups.
    #if the group has labels of 0 and 2
    #i find out the new label 0, that is the min of the two.
    #i than replace them with 0.
    for i in range(n_groups):

        #if there is only zero/one element in the group, skip
        if len(groups[i])<=1:
            continue

        indices=list(map(elements.index, groups[i]))

        labels_for_group=list(set([labels[i] for i in indices]))
        #if their is only one label, all the elements in group are already have the same label, skip.
        if len(labels_for_group)==1:

            continue

        labels_for_group.sort()
        label=labels_for_group[0]

        #combine
        for k in range(n_elements):
            if labels[k] in labels_for_group[1:]:
                labels[k]=label


    new_groups=[]
    for label in set(labels):
        new_group = [elements[i] for i, v in enumerate(labels) if v == label]
        new_groups.append(new_group)

    return new_groups

I printed out the detailed result for your question:

cluser_combine([['a','b','c'],['b','d','e'],['k'],['o','p'],['e','f'],['p','a'],['d','g']])

elements:
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'k', 'o', 'p']
labels:
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
--------------------group 0-------------------------
the group is:
['a', 'b', 'c']
indices for the group in elements
[0, 1, 2]
labels before combination
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
--------------------group 1-------------------------
the group is:
['b', 'd', 'e']
indices for the group in elements
[1, 3, 4]
labels before combination
[0, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
--------------------group 2-------------------------
the group is:
['k']
--------------------group 3-------------------------
the group is:
['o', 'p']
indices for the group in elements
[8, 9]
labels before combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
--------------------group 4-------------------------
the group is:
['e', 'f']
indices for the group in elements
[4, 5]
labels before combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 7, 8, 8]
--------------------group 5-------------------------
the group is:
['p', 'a']
indices for the group in elements
[9, 0]
labels before combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 7, 8, 8]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 7, 0, 0]
--------------------group 6-------------------------
the group is:
['d', 'g']
indices for the group in elements
[3, 6]
labels before combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6, 7, 0, 0]
combining...
labels after combination
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 7, 0, 0]
([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 7, 0, 0],
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'o', 'p'], ['k']])

Please refer to my github jupyter notebook for details

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