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Suppose I have a program like the following

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  if (argc < 2) return 1;
  long buflen = atol(argv[1]);
  char *buf = malloc(buflen);
  fread(buf, 1, buflen, stdin);

  // Do stuff with buf

  free(buf);
  return 0;
}

Programs like these typically have more complex cleanup code, often including several calls to free and sometimes labels or even cleanup functions for error handling.

My question is this: Is the free(buf) at the end actually necessary? My understanding is that the kernel will automatically clean up unfreed memory when the program exits, but if this is the case, why is putting free at the end of code such a common pattern?

BusyBox provides a compilation option to disable calling free at the end of execution. If this isn't an issue, then why would anyone disable that option? Is it purely because programs like Valgrind detect memory leaks when allocated memory isn't freed?

marked as duplicate by Pac0, Zan Lynx, Jean-François Fabre, Eric Postpischil c Jan 24 '18 at 22:54

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  • 4
    Necessary? In most cases no. But it is a good habit to clean after yourself. – Eugene Sh. Jan 24 '18 at 20:17
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    To add to the previous comment, imagine you use different little programs like your example together to build another bigger program / application. Or turn it somehow into a daemon that keeps running and execute your function several times. If you have not put any free, you could easily forgot to add it when combining the pieces together / make it run in a loop. And now your program has severe memory leak. – Pac0 Jan 24 '18 at 20:20
  • stackoverflow.com/q/5612095/13422 – Zan Lynx Jan 24 '18 at 20:21
4

Actually, as in absolutely? On a modern operating system, no. In some environments, yes.

It's always a good plan to clean up everything you allocate as this makes it very easy to scan for memory leaks. If you have outstanding allocations just prior to your exit you have a leak. If you don't free things because the OS does it for you then you don't know if it's a mistake or intended behaviour.

You're also supposed to check for errors from any function that might return them, like fread, but you don't, so you're already firmly in the danger zone here. Is this mission critical code where if it crashes Bad Things happen? If so you'll want to do everything absolutely by the book.

As Jean-François pointed out the way this trivial code is composed is a bad example. Most programs will look more like this:

void do_stuff_with_buf(char* arg) {
  long buflen = atol(arg);
  char *buf = malloc(buflen);
  fread(buf, 1, buflen, stdin);

  // Do stuff with buf

  free(buf);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  if (argc < 2)
    return 1;

  do_stuff_with_buf(argv[1])

  return 0;
}

Here it should be more obvious that the do_stuff_with_buf function should clean up for itself, it can't depend on the program exiting to release resources. If that function was called multiple times you shouldn't leak memory, that's just sloppy and can cause serious problems. A run-away allocation can cause things like the infamous Linux "OOM killer" to show up and go on a murder spree to free up some memory, something that usually leads to nothing but chaos and confusion.

  • 1
    Good point about checking for errors from fread. That was just an example though, rather than actual code. – Samadi Jan 24 '18 at 20:27
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    take AmigaOS for instance. It doesn't have resource tracking. If you don't free the memory, you don't get it until you reboot (with ctrl+A+A :)) – Jean-François Fabre Jan 24 '18 at 20:29
  • 1
    Fantastic, thanks for the extra detail! – Samadi Jan 24 '18 at 20:31
  • 1
    another reason: if one day you're turning your main into a service/endless loop, you'll be glad that you handled the frees properly. – Jean-François Fabre Jan 24 '18 at 20:33
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Or use valgrind --leak-kinds=all if your operating system supports it. – Iharob Al Asimi Jan 24 '18 at 20:40

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