6

In Kotlin I have two lists:

val x: List<Int> = listOf(1,2,3,4,5,6)
val y: List<Int> = listOf(2,3,4,5,6,7)

How do I get:

val z: List<Int> = 3,5,7,9,11,13

without using loops?

2 Answers 2

15

Assuming both list have the same size:

  1. Using zip

    val sum = x.zip(y) { xv, yv -> xv + yv }
    
  2. Using simple map and mapIndexed

    val sum = (0 until x.size).map { x[it] + y[it] }
    // or
    val sum = x.mapIndexed { index, xv -> xv + y[index] }
    

When the size can be different and you would assume 0 for out of range entries:

  1. Using an array

    val sum = IntArray(maxOf(x.size, y.size)) { 
        x.getOrElse(it, {0}) + y.getOrElse(it, {0}) 
    }.toList()
    
  2. Using range:

    val sum = (0 until maxOf(x.size, y.size)).map { 
        x.getOrElse(it, {0}) + y.getOrElse(it, {0})
    }
    
  3. Extending the lists to same size

    val xExtended = x + Array(maxOf(0, y.size - x.size), { 0 })
    val yExtended = y + Array(maxOf(0, x.size - y.size), { 0 })
    val sum = xExtended.zip(yExtended) { xv, yv -> xv + yv }
    
2

I'd go with a range and map:

val sums = (0 until x.size).map { x[it] + y[it] }

It's probably less overhead than zip.

3
  • 1
    I checked, zip does minimally more work (namely range checks). Therefore I would prefer zip(), for safety and readability. Jan 25, 2018 at 6:13
  • @leoderprofi So the created intermediate zipped list isn’t relevant
    – s1m0nw1
    Jan 25, 2018 at 8:47
  • map(), as well as zip() return a new List therefore both have the same overhead for creating an object. In addition I did a small performance test (nothing worthy of sowing) and concluded that the performance of both is equal. Jan 26, 2018 at 12:04

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