7

MobX documentation suggests I should use observer on all my components. However by using inject I get more fine grained control over what data causes a re-rendering of my components.

My understanding is I that with observer, a change in all accessed observables in the last render will cause a re-render, even if the observable is nested deep in the data store, while inject only re-renders when observables accessed in the injector function change.

For example:

class Store{
  @observable data = {
    nestedData: {
      deepData: 'my_data'
    }
  }
}

const store = new Store();

... Assume the store is injected using <Provider /> component

// This will cause re-render when the data object changes
// for example: store.data = { new_data: 'new_data' }
@inject(stores => {
  return { data: stores.dataStore.data }; 
})
class MyComponent extends Component {  }

// This will re-render on change of the data object, but also
// on change of nestedData and deepData properties
@inject(stores => {
  return { data: stores.dataStore.data }; 
})
@observer
class MyComponent extends Component {  }

Could someone confirm my understanding of this?

In my opinion, it's better to use only inject as it gives you more control, and can prevent unnecessary re-renders. If the data is deeply nested you could create a computed property that gets and prepares the data from the deep structure and then inject that property in the component.

Are there other benefits/drawbacks when using one over the other

0

1 Answer 1

5

I believe you are correct in your assessment. Let me try to rephrase for clarity:

@observer tracks which observables are used by render and automatically re-renders the component when one of these values changes.

We should note that @observable values used by render might be deeply nested within a given prop, per your example:

class Store{
  @observable data = {
    nestedData: {
      // changes to `deepData` would theoretically re-render any observer
      deepData: 'my_data' 
    }
  }
}

with observer, a change in all accessed observables in the last render will cause a re-render, even if the observable is nested deep in the data store

Bingo!

Although there's a quirk with observable, as you'll see in a moment...


On the other hand you have @inject which makes available to a component (via props) specific data structures defined by a Provider.

For example:

@inject('title')
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
    render() {
        return (<div>{this.props.title}</div>);
    }
}

const Container = () => (
    <Provider title="This value is passed as a prop using `inject`">
        <MyComponent />
    </Provider>
);

inject only re-renders when observables accessed in the injector function change.

Bingo!

inject will only spawn a re-render if the prop itself has recognized changes.


This is effectively the same issue with shouldComponentUpdate() and a deep-comparison of props -- though observer seems to be far more efficient than shouldComponentUpdate.

In my opinion, it's better to use only inject as it gives you more control, and can prevent unnecessary re-renders.

I wouldn't necessarily go that far... it all depends on how you have your code structured.

If I modify your original example as so:

class Store{
    @observable data = {
        nestedData: {}
    };

    constructor() {
        this.data.nestedData.deepData = 'my_data';
    }
}

...the addition of deepData won't actually get picked up as an observable change (i.e. re-render) because that property didn't exist when we originally tagged data as an observable value. So that's one problem.

A different approach could be to do something like this:

class Person {
    @observable name = 'John Doe';
}

class Store{
    @observable data = null;

    constructor() {
        this.data = new Person();
    }
}

This allows you to spread the observable values out across classes -- so you might still want to inject Store into a component (to access Store.data but ultimately any observable changes come from updating Person.

2
  • "the addition of deepData won't actually get picked up as an observable change" - This is mentioned in Mobx documentation. They recommend using the Map structure if you need to react to adding properties to an object. Jan 27, 2018 at 15:39
  • Guys please see my question too: stackoverflow.com/questions/48528283/… Thanks
    – b24
    Feb 1, 2018 at 10:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.