6

I have a algorithm problem that I need to speed up :)

I need a 32bit random number, with exact 10 bits set to 1. But in the same time, patterns like 101 (5 dec) and 11 (3 dec) to be considered illegal.

Now the MCU is a 8051 (8 bit) and I tested all this in Keil uVision. My first attempt completes, giving the solution

0x48891249
1001000100010010001001001001001   // correct, 10 bits 1, no 101 or 11

The problem is that it completes in 97 Seconds or 1165570706 CPU cycles which is ridiculous!!!

Here is my code

// returns 1 if number is not good. ie. contains at leats one 101 bit sequence
bool checkFive(unsigned long num)
{
    unsigned char tmp;

    do {

            tmp = (unsigned char)num;

        if(
            (tmp & 7) == 5 
        || (tmp & 3) == 3
        ) // illegal pattern 11 or 101
                return true; // found 

            num >>= 1;
    }while(num);

    return false;
}

void main(void) {


    unsigned long v,num; // count the number of bits set in v
    unsigned long c; // c accumulates the total bits set in v

    do {
            num = (unsigned long)rand() << 16 | rand(); 
            v = num;

            // count all 1 bits, Kernigen style
            for (c = 0; v; c++)
                    v &= v - 1; // clear the least significant bit set

    }while(c != 10 || checkFive(num));

  while(1);
}

The big question for a brilliant mind :) Can be done faster? Seems that my approach is naive.

Thank you in advance,

Wow, I'm impressed, thanks all for suggestions. However, before accept, I need to test them these days.

Now with the first option (look-up) it's just not realistic, will complete blow my 4K RAM of entire 8051 micro controller :) As you can see in image bellow, I tested for all combinations in Code Blocks but there are way more than 300 and it's not finished yet until 5000 index...

enter image description here

The code I use to test

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

//#define bool  bit
//#define   true    1
//#define false 0



// returns 1 if number is not good. ie. contains at leats one 101 bit sequence
bool checkFive(uint32_t num)
{
    uint8_t tmp;

    do {

            tmp = (unsigned char)num;

        if(
            (tmp & 7) == 5
        || (tmp & 3) == 3
        ) // illegal pattern 11 or 101
                return true; // found

            num >>= 1;
    }while(num);

    return false;
}

void main(void) {


    uint32_t v,num; // count the number of bits set in v
    uint32_t c, count=0; // c accumulates the total bits set in v

    //printf("Program started \n");

    num = 0;

    printf("Program started \n");

    for(num=0; num <= 0xFFFFFFFF; num++)
    {


        //do {



                //num = (uint32_t)rand() << 16 | rand();
                v = num;

                // count all 1 bits, Kernigen style
                for (c = 0; v; c++)
                        v &= v - 1; // clear the least significant bit set

        //}while(c != 10 || checkFive(num));

                if(c != 10 || checkFive(num))
                    continue;

                count++;

        printf("%d: %04X\n", count, num);
    }

    printf("Complete \n");
  while(1);
}

Perhaps I can re-formulate the problem:

I need a number with:

  • precise (known) amount of 1 bits, 10 in my example
  • not having 11 or 101 patterns
  • remaining zeroes can be any

So somehow, shuffle only the 1 bits inside.

Or, take a 0x00000000 and add just 10 of 1 bits in random positions, except the illegal patterns.

9
  • The CLOCKS_PER_SEC macro is unreliable (it is out dated). 97 seconds would most be close to 300 billion cycles on a modern computer
    – Cpp plus 1
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:31
  • 3
    Just randomly shuffle an array of 10 ones and 22 zeros.
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:34
  • 1
    @EugeneSh. but what about the patterns to be excluded? Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:37
  • 1
    I wonder how many of such numbers exist at all. It is easy to check exhaustively. I expect not that many, so maybe just enumerate them and pick randomly?
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:41
  • 1
    this algorithm is upside down. Since the rules are so restrictive it is better to generate using the rules than to generate an int and see if its OK
    – pm100
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:48

4 Answers 4

7

Solution

Given a routine r(n) that returns a random integer from 0 (inclusive) to n (exclusive) with uniform distribution, the values described in the question may be generated with a uniform distribution by calls to P(10, 4) where P is:

static uint32_t P(int a, int b)
{
    if (a == 0 && b == 0)
        return 0;
    else
        return r(a+b) < a ? P(a-1, b) << 3 | 1 : P(a, b-1) << 1;
}

The required random number generator can be:

static int r(int a)
{
    int q;

    do
        q = rand() / ((RAND_MAX+1u)/a);
    while (a <= q);

    return q;
}

(The purpose of dividing by (RAND_MAX+1u)/a and the do-while loop is to trim the range of rand to an even multiple of a so that bias due to a non-multiple range is eliminated.)

(The recursion in P may be converted to iteration. This is omitted as it is unnecessary to illustrate the algorithm.)

Discussion

If the number cannot contain consecutive bits 11 or 101, then the closest together two 1 bits can be is three bits apart, as in 1001. Fitting ten 1 bits in 32 bits then requires at least 28 bits, as in 1001001001001001001001001001. Therefore, to satisfy the constraints that there is no 11 or 101 and there are exactly 10 1 bits, the value must be 1001001001001001001001001001 with four 0 bits inserted in some positions (including possibly the beginning or the end).

Selecting such a value is equivalent to placing 10 instances of 001 and 4 instances of 0 in some order.1 There are 14! ways of ordering 14 items, but any of the 10! ways of rearranging the 10 001 instances with each other are identical, and any of the 4! ways of rearranging the 0 instances with each other are identical, so the number of distinct selections is 14! / 10! / 4!, also known as the number of combinations of selecting 10 things from 14. This is 1,001.

To perform such a selection with uniform distribution, we can use a recursive algorithm:

  • Select the first choice with probability distribution equal to the proportion of the choices in the possible orderings.
  • Select the remaining choices recursively.

When ordering a instances of one object and b of a second object, a/(a+b) of the potential orderings will start with the first object, and b/(a+b) will start with the second object. Thus, the design of the P routine is:

  • If there are no objects to put in order, return the empty bit string.
  • Select a random integer in [0, a+b). If it is less than a (which has probability a/(a+b)), insert the bit string 001 and then recurse to select an order for a-1 instances of 001 and b instances of 0.
  • Otherwise, insert the bit string 0 and then recurse to select an order for a instances of 001 and b-1 instances of 0.

(Since, once a is zero, only 0 instances are generated, if (a == 0 && b == 0) in P may be changed to if (a == 0). I left it in the former form as that shows the general form of a solution in case other strings are involved.)

Bonus

Here is a program to list all values (although not in ascending order).

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

static void P(uint32_t x, int a, int b)
{
    if (a == 0 && b == 0)
        printf("0x%x\n", x);
    else
    {
        if (0 < a) P(x << 3 | 1, a-1, b);
        if (0 < b) P(x << 1, a, b-1);
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    P(0, 10, 4);
}

Footnote

1 This formulation means we end up with a string starting 001… rather than 1…, but the resulting value, interpreted as binary, is equivalent, even if there are instances of 0 inserted ahead of it. So the strings with 10 001 and 4 0 are in one-to-one correspondence with the strings with 4 0 inserted into 1001001001001001001001001001.

12
  • 1
    So I would recommend building a lookup table and pick the value randomly. Given your answer it should be a small one.
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:47
  • @EugeneSh.: I was mistaken at first; the constraints require only 28 bits for the 1s, not 31, so there are more than just 11 solutions. A lookup table would still be feasible, but it would be large. Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:51
  • 11_chose_4 is 330. More than feasible....Well, the 8051 environment might be pretty constrained though
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:52
  • @EugeneSh.: 330 is for selection without replacement. In this case, there may be duplicates. Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:54
  • I am rusty on combinatorics, sorry. The point is made I guess :) As I said, the table can be even generated exhaustively offline.
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 16:56
5

One way to satisfy your criteria in a limited number of solutions is to utilize the fact that there can be no more that four groups of 000s within the bit population. This also means that there can one be one group of 0000 in the value. Knowing this, you can seed your value with a single 1 in bits 27-31 and then continue adding random bits checking that each bit added satisfies your 3 or 5 constraints.

When adding random bits to your value and satisfying your constraints, there can always be combinations that lead to a solution that can never satisfy all constraints. To protect against those cases, just keep an iteration count and reset/restart the value generation if iterations exceed that value. Here, if a solution is going to be found, it will be found in less than 100 iterations. And is generally found in 1-8 attempts. Meaning for each value you generate, you have on average no more than 800 iterations which will be a far cry less than "97 Seconds or 1165570706 CPU cycles" (I haven't counted cycles, but the return is almost instantaneous)

There are many ways to approach this problem, this is just one that worked in a reasonable amount of time:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <limits.h>

#define BPOP   10
#define NBITS  32
#define LIMIT 100

/** rand_int for use with shuffle */
static int rand_int (int n)
{
    int limit = RAND_MAX - RAND_MAX % n, rnd;

    rnd = rand();
    for (; rnd >= limit; )
        rnd = rand();

    return rnd % n;
}

int main (void) {

    int pop = 0;
    unsigned v = 0, n = NBITS;
    size_t its = 1;

    srand (time (NULL));

    /* one of first 5 bits must be set */
    v |= 1u << (NBITS - 1 - rand_int (sizeof v + 1));
    pop++;      /* increment pop count */

    while (pop < BPOP) {        /* loop until pop count 10 */
        if (++its >= LIMIT) {   /* check iterations */
#ifdef DEBUG
            fprintf (stderr, "failed solution.\n");
#endif
            pop = its = 1;  /* reset for next iteration */
            v = 0;
            v |= 1u << (NBITS - 1 - rand_int (sizeof v + 1));
        }

        unsigned shift = rand_int (NBITS);  /* get random shift */

        if (v & (1u << shift))   /* if bit already set */
            continue;
        /* protect against 5 (101) */
        if ((shift + 2) < NBITS && v & (1u << (shift + 2)))
            continue;
        if ((int)(shift - 2) >= 0 && v & (1u << (shift - 2)))
            continue;
        /* protect against 3 (11) */
        if ((shift + 1) < NBITS && v & (1u << (shift + 1)))
            continue;
        if ((int)(shift - 1) >= 0 && v & (1u << (shift - 1)))
            continue;

        v |= 1u << shift;   /* add bit at shift */
        pop++;              /* increment pop count */
    }
    printf ("\nv : 0x%08x\n", v);   /* output value */

    while (n--) {   /* output binary confirmation */
        if (n+1 < NBITS && (n+1) % 4 == 0)
            putchar ('-');
        putchar ((v >> n & 1) ? '1' : '0');
    }
    putchar ('\n');
#ifdef DEBUG
    printf ("\nits: %zu\n", its);
#endif

    return 0;
}

(note: you will probably want a better random source like getrandom() or reading from /dev/urandom if you intend to generate multiple random solutions within a loop -- expecially if you are calling the executable in a loop from your shell)

I have also included a DEBUG define that you can enable by adding the -DDEBUG option to your compiler string to see the number of failed solutions and number of iterations on the final.

Example Use/Output

The results for 8 successive runs:

$ ./bin/randbits

v : 0x49124889
0100-1001-0001-0010-0100-1000-1000-1001

v : 0x49124492
0100-1001-0001-0010-0100-0100-1001-0010

v : 0x48492449
0100-1000-0100-1001-0010-0100-0100-1001

v : 0x91249092
1001-0001-0010-0100-1001-0000-1001-0010

v : 0x92488921
1001-0010-0100-1000-1000-1001-0010-0001

v : 0x89092489
1000-1001-0000-1001-0010-0100-1000-1001

v : 0x82491249
1000-0010-0100-1001-0001-0010-0100-1001

v : 0x92448922
1001-0010-0100-0100-1000-1001-0010-0010
3
  • 1000 1000 1000 1000 1001 0010 0100 1001 would give four groups of three zeros... did I do something wrong or did you miss something?
    – Chris
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 18:58
  • 1
    No, that works, My count was off by one :) fixing. Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 19:01
  • @David C. Rankin thanks, appears very nice, I will test it.
    – yo3hcv
    Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 6:33
2

As Eric mentioned in his answer, since each 1 but must be separated by at least two 0 bits, you basically start with the 28-bit pattern 1001001001001001001001001001. It's then a matter of placing the remaining four 0 bits within this bit pattern, and there are 11 distinct places to insert each zero.

This can be accomplished by first selecting a random number from 1 to 11 to determine where to place a bit. Then you left shift all the bits above the target bit by 1. Repeat 3 more times, and you have your value.

This can be done as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <time.h>

void binprint(uint32_t n)
{
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<32;i++) {
        if ( n & (1u << (31 - i))) {
            putchar('1');
        } else {
            putchar('0');
        }
    }
}

// inserts a 0 bit into val after pos "1" bits are found
uint32_t insert(uint32_t val, int pos)
{
    int cnt = 0;
    uint32_t mask = 1u << 31;
    uint32_t upper, lower;

    while (cnt < pos) {
        if (val & mask) {              // look for a set bit and count if you find one
            cnt++;
        }
        mask >>= 1;
    }

    if (mask == (1u << 31)) {
        return val;                    // insert at the start: no change
    } else if (mask == 0) {
        return val << 1;               // insert at the end: shift the whole thing by 1
    } else {
        mask = (mask << 1) - 1;        // mask has all bits below the target set
        lower = val & mask;            // extract the lower portion
        upper = val & (~mask);         // extract the upper portion
        return (upper << 1) | lower;   // recombine with the upper portion shifted 1 bit
    }
}

int main()
{
    int i;
    uint32_t val = 01111111111;        // hey look, a good use of octal!

    srand(time(NULL));
    for (i=0;i<4;i++) {
        int p = rand() % 11;
        printf("p=%d\n", p);
        val = insert(val, p);
    }

    binprint(val);
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

Sample output for two runs:

p=3
p=10
p=9
p=0
01001001000100100100100100100010

...

p=3
p=9
p=3
p=1
10001001000010010010010010010001

Run time is negligible.

2
  • This does not produce a uniform distribution on the possible values because it may create the same value in multiple ways (and different numbers of ways for different values). For example, there is only one way to create the pattern with all 0 bits inserted in slot 1 (all four random numbers are 1) but multiple ways to create the pattern with one 0 in slot 1 and the rest in slot 2 (first random number is 1, rest are 2; second is 2, rest are 1; etc.). Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 23:34
  • Thanks too, I will test also
    – yo3hcv
    Commented Jan 29, 2018 at 10:44
1

Since you don't want a lookup table here is the way:

Basically you have this number with 28 bits set to 0 and 1 in which you need to insert 4x 0 :

0b1001001001001001001001001001

Hence you can use the following algorithm:

int special_rng_nolookup(void)
{
    int secret = 0b1001001001001001001001001001;
    int low_secret;
    int high_secret;
    unsigned int i = 28; // len of secret
    unsigned int rng;
    int mask = 0xffff // equivalent to all bits set in integer

    while (i < 32)
    {
        rng = __asm__ volatile(.    // Pseudo code
                    "rdrand"
                 );
        rng %= (i + 1);  // will generate a number between 0 and 28 where you will add a 0. Then between 0 and 29, 30, 31 for the 3 next loop.
        low_secret = secret & (mask >> (i - rng)); // locate where you will add your 0 and save the lower part of your number.
        high_secret = (secret ^ low_secret) << (!(!rng)); // remove the lower part to your int and shift to insert a 0 between the higher part and the lower part. edit : if rng was 0 you want to add it at the very beginning (left part) so no shift.
        secret = high_secret | low_secret; // put them together.
        ++i;
    }
    return secret;
}
9
  • int table[1001] Congratulations, you just made the OP's 8051 explode in pieces. Do you even know what 8051 is?
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 14:54
  • No I didn't but OP is already aware of the memory limitations of 8051. You are quick to criticize what looks like a foolish answer (and it is indeed considering RAM limitations) but what about my second answer ? Also please note that the question is tagged "c" and not "embedded". I removed first answer so remove your downvote as well ;) Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 15:04
  • You are still using 32 bit arithmetic, even though the OP has clearly stated they are using 8051. Or rather, you think that you are using 32 bit arithmetic but int is 16 bits on the OP's system. I also think that x86 inline assembler will be very hard to run on 8051. 8051 is not a PC. It is one of the slowest, most horrible CPU:s ever made.
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 15:13
  • Because they have no clue what they are doing.
    – Lundin
    Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 15:17
  • @Lundin: These days, most 8051 are 1-2 TCY for 80% instructions. Even so, a ARM Cortex M0 (32 bit) will be out-powered due to 16 bit thumb only usage and/or missing powerful instructions. In addition, MCU cannot be changed for several reasons.
    – yo3hcv
    Commented Jan 29, 2018 at 10:49

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