28

I have written a Higher Order Component:

import React from 'react';


const NewHOC = (PassedComponent) => {
    return class extends React.Component {
        render(){
            return (
                <div>
                    <PassedComponent {...this.props}/>
                </div>
            )
        }
    }
}

export default NewHOC;

I am using the above in my App.js:

import React from 'react';
import Movie from './movie/Movie';
import MyHOC from './hoc/MyHOC';
import NewHOC from './hoc/NewHOC';
export default class App extends React.Component {
  render() {
   return (
    <div>
     Hello From React!!
     <NewHOC>
        <Movie name="Blade Runner"></Movie>
     </NewHOC>
    </div>
   );
  }
 }

But, the warning I am getting is:

Warning: Functions are not valid as a React child. This may happen if you return a Component instead of <Component /> from render. Or maybe you meant to call this function rather than return it. in NewHOC (created by App) in div (created by App) in App

The Movie.js file is:

import React from "react";

export default class Movie extends React.Component{
    render() {
        return <div>
            Hello from Movie {this.props.name}
            {this.props.children}</div>
    }
}

What am I doing wrong?

  • 2
    You are using it as a regular parent component. i think you should do something along this: const newComponent = NewHOC(Movie ) – Sagiv b.g Jan 26 '18 at 9:15
  • Thanks. It solves the issue. – learner Jan 26 '18 at 9:19
  • Aw great, i just added it as an answer :) – Sagiv b.g Jan 26 '18 at 9:20
25

You are using it as a regular component, but its actually a function that returns a component.

Try doing something like this:

const NewComponent = NewHOC(Movie)

And you will use it like this:

<NewComponent someProp="someValue" />

Here is a running example:

const NewHOC = (PassedComponent) => {
  return class extends React.Component {
    render() {
      return (
        <div>
          <PassedComponent {...this.props} />
        </div>
      )
    }
  }
}

const Movie = ({name}) => <div>{name}</div>

const NewComponent = NewHOC(Movie);

function App() {
  return (
    <div>
      <NewComponent name="Kill Bill" />
    </div>
  );
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="root"/>

So basically NewHOC is just a function that accepts a component and returns a new component that renders the component passed in. We usually use this pattern to enhance components and share logic or data.

You can read about HOCS in the docs and i also recommend reading about the difference between react elements and components

  • 3
    Could you explain more your answer? I'm having the same warning issue – Oximer Oct 1 '18 at 14:57
  • @Oximer What did you not understand? – Sagiv b.g Oct 1 '18 at 15:08
  • Where you should implement this code, am I right? @Oximer – OuuGiii Oct 30 '18 at 13:53
  • 1
    voted down, because this doesn't explain anything nor provides any further reading on the subject. Not even the OP has explained how he/she finds this answer valuable. Cryptic answers are worse than no answer. Context is everything. Nobody who reads this can know for sure WHERE to place this code snippet. Furthermore, the explanation itself makes no sense: it only makes sense if the implementation details in React make a shallow evaluation of the expression, as functions are known to be 1st class citizens in Javascript. – Yoshimitsu Nov 1 '18 at 2:22
  • 2
    i was under the impression that this is obvious, a function that returns a new component. anyway i added a running example and ref to the docs. – Sagiv b.g Nov 1 '18 at 6:44
3

Adding to sagiv's answer, we should create the parent component in such a way that it can consist all children components rather than returning the child components in the way you were trying to return.

Try to intentiate the parent component and pass the props inside it so that all children can use it like below

const NewComponent = NewHOC(Movie);

Here NewHOC is the parent component and all its child are going to use movie as props.

But any way, you guyd6 have solved a problem for new react developers as this might be a problem that can come too and here is where they can find the solution for that.

0

In my case, I was transport class component from parent and use it inside as a prop var, using typescript and Formik, and run well like this:

Parent 1

import Parent2 from './../components/Parent2/parent2'
import Parent3 from './../components/Parent3/parent3'

export default class Parent1 extends React.Component {
  render(){
    <React.Fragment>
      <Parent2 componentToFormik={Parent3} />
    </React.Fragment>
  }
}

Parent 2

export default Parent2 extends React.Component{
  render(){
    const { componentToFormik } = this.props
    return(
    <Formik 
      render={(formikProps) => {
        return(
          <React.fragment>
            {(new componentToFormik(formikProps)).render()}
          </React.fragment>
        )
      }}
    />
    )
  }
}
0

In my case i forgot to add the () after the function name inside the render function of a react component

public render() {
       let ctrl = (
           <>
                <div className="aaa">
                    {this.renderView}
                </div>
            </>
       ); 

       return ctrl;
    };


    private renderView() : JSX.Element {
        // some html
    };

Changing the render method, as it states in the error message to

        <div className="aaa">
            {this.renderView()}
        </div>

fixed the problem

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