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I have two tables (A, B) with a foreign key from B to A. So A is my parent table and B my child.

I now insert a row in B before the parent row exists in A. So I set the foreign key to an id I know parent A will have, but which is not existing right know. To achieve that I use the option 'SET foreign_key_checks = 0', which allows to set a foreign key in the child B without the existens of the key in the parent A.

My question is, what will happen, if I add the row in A with the missing primary key. Will the foreign key <-> primary key connection work and will it be as fast as normal? Or do I have to drop the fk key and rebuild it?

I use InnoDB and MySQL 5.5.

... and I know that is probably very bad practice...

Or short:

I have a parent and a child table, linked by a foreign key. I add the child first, what happens if I add the parent later?

5
  • just to get clear picture, B is your parent table ? – Ravi Jan 26 '18 at 10:16
  • If teh B is the parent table, then the question has no sense! – Hamza Abdaoui Jan 26 '18 at 10:19
  • A is the parent table. B is the Child of A – Linus Jan 26 '18 at 10:20
  • I guess another way to put it is if I add to child before parent exists (which you say is possible) will referential integrity be enforced if I try to update B or will on delete cascade on update cascade delete or update if I then delete or update parent. Dunno you could try it. – P.Salmon Jan 26 '18 at 10:46
  • Have an INDEX; don't bother with a FOREIGN KEY. – Rick James Jan 29 '18 at 15:18
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My question is, what will happen, if I add the row in A with the missing primary key. Will the foreign key <-> primary key connection work and will it be as fast as normal? Or do I have to drop the fk key and rebuild it?

If you will add missing record into parent table, the FK constraint will work as it should be. You will actually solve the data inconsistency. There is no need to recreate FK.

4
  • Not sure about that referential integrity does not appear to be enforced without a rebuild. – P.Salmon Jan 26 '18 at 11:21
  • Referential check appears, when you insert into child table. Nothing is checked, when you insert into parent table. But when you delete from parent table referential integrity is checked. – Pavel Katiushyn Jan 26 '18 at 11:28
  • But that's not what OP is saying, he is inserting into child before parent exists. – P.Salmon Jan 26 '18 at 11:30
  • First he disables FK constraint with SET foreign_key_checks = 0 and then inserts. That is possible. After he enables SET foreign_key_checks = 1, the data is inconsistent. To restore consistency, he can insert record into parent table. – Pavel Katiushyn Jan 26 '18 at 11:33
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I tried it myself by creating an example.

CREATE TABLE `parent` (
  `idparent` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idparent`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;


CREATE TABLE `parent` (
  `idparent` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idparent`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

SET foreign_key_checks = 0;

INSERT INTO child (idchild, parentid) VALUES (1,1),(2,2),(3,3),(4,4),(5,5);   

SET foreign_key_checks = 1;

INSERT INTO parent (idparent) VALUES (1),(2),(3),(4),(5);

Next, I used explain to get an idea, if the index is used:

EXPLAIN SELECT * from parent p
join child c on c.parentid = p.idparent;

+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------+-----------------+---------+----------------------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys   | key             | key_len | ref                  | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------+-----------------+---------+----------------------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | index | PRIMARY         | PRIMARY         | 4       | NULL                 |    5 | Using index              |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | c     | ref   | fk_parentid_idx | fk_parentid_idx | 5       | remove_me.p.idparent |    1 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+-----------------+-----------------+---------+----------------------+------+--------------------------+

So it looks like it uses the index, altough at first the foreign key was not set. Therefore, it should be at least speedwise no problem.

-1
INSERT INTO `area` (
    `area_id` PRIMARY KEY,
    `area_name`,
    `chemist_id`FOREIGN KEY
)
VALUES (
    [value-1],
    [value-2],
    [value-3]
)
3
  • please can you explain what this code does? thanks! – corn on the cob Feb 28 at 9:27
  • 1
    Please consider explaining the code. – Helper Feb 28 at 14:59
  • That doesn't even look like valid SQL code – Nico Haase Mar 2 at 7:38

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