5

I'm wanting to consolidate all my error logging down to a single method that can call from all over my application when we handle exceptions. I have a few awkward constraints I will describe below.

   public void Log(Exception ex)
   {
        string innerMessage = "";
        if (ex.InnerException != null)
        {
            innerMessage = ex.InnerException.Message;
        }

        Console.WriteLine($"Message: {ex.Message} # Location: { ex.StackTrace} # InnerMessasge: {innerMessage}" );
    }

I have parsed the stack before but the code ends up ugly and depending on the stack it can mess up.

All I really want is where the exception was thrown, the class and method or class and line for the location. To ensure that the whole thing sits neatly on a single line in the logs.

3

You don't need to parse the exception yourself, you can use the StackTrace class to get an easy to understand stack trace from an exception:

try
{
    int.Parse("dd");
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    var s = new StackTrace(e); // Gets the stack trace where the exception was thrown not where it was caught.
    var frame = s.GetFrame(0);
    var sourceMethod = frame.GetMethod();
    Console.WriteLine($"Method: {sourceMethod.Name} - Class {sourceMethod.DeclaringType.FullName} : Location: {frame.GetILOffset()}");

}

You can get other information from the frame, such as file, line, column if they are available, also you can walk up the stack to find one of your classes instead of a framework class (you get all the frames from the StrackTrace and find the one you need).

2

.Net has some very useful Caller Member attributes you can use for things like this. Put these on a method and the compiler will set the values to the member name, line number or file path where the method was called.

public void Log(Exception ex, [CallerFilePath]string callerFilePath = null, [CallerMemberName]string callerMemberName = null, [CallerLineNumber]int callerLineNumber = 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Message: {ex.Message} # File: {callerFilePath} # Line: {callerLineNumber} # Member: {callerMemberName}"  );
}

So, every time you call the Log method you will get the line number and file path where the method was called. This is also very cheap performane wise, because the compiler inserts them as constants, rather than having to pull them out with reflection.

Note, this log the location at which you called the Log method, not the original location the exception was thrown at, but depending on your needs, that may be sufficient.

  • I thought of caller member attributes as well, but I'm not sure this fits the requirement, in the question he states that he want location info for the source of the exception not the place where it is caught – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Jan 26 '18 at 10:52
  • I was not aware of these attributes, I am not sure it is what I will use here but I will surely use this in the future. – Mr_road Jan 26 '18 at 11:24
0

One of the efficient way to solve this messiness from production point of view is to put it in event viewer all the logs instead of in Console.

Apart from that ,below formation of organizing error helps very well.

        public void Log(Exception ex)
           {
         // Create an instance of StringBuilder. This class is in System.Text namespace
                StringBuilder sbExceptionMessage = new StringBuilder();
                sbExceptionMessage.Append("Exception Type" + Environment.NewLine);
                // Get the exception type
                sbExceptionMessage.Append(exception.GetType().Name);
                // Environment.NewLine writes new line character - \n
                sbExceptionMessage.Append(Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);
                sbExceptionMessage.Append("Message" + Environment.NewLine);
                // Get the exception message
                sbExceptionMessage.Append(exception.Message + Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);
                sbExceptionMessage.Append("Stack Trace" + Environment.NewLine);
                // Get the exception stack trace
                sbExceptionMessage.Append(exception.StackTrace + Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);

                // Retrieve inner exception if any
                Exception innerException = exception.InnerException;
                // If inner exception exists
                while (innerException != null)
                {
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append("Exception Type" + Environment.NewLine);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append(innerException.GetType().Name);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append(Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append("Message" + Environment.NewLine);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append(innerException.Message + Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append("Stack Trace" + Environment.NewLine);
                    sbExceptionMessage.Append(innerException.StackTrace + Environment.NewLine + Environment.NewLine);

                    // Retrieve inner exception if any
                    innerException = innerException.InnerException;
    }
}

Now sbExceptionMessage contains every detail of your exception,you can even use this easily to add the same log to event viewer or any particular text file or console.Decision is yours.

  • "All I really want is where the exception was thrown, the class and method or class and line for the location" - Your answer just concatenates all the stack traces and exception types, it does not get the source method and class from where the exception was thrown.. unless I'm missing something – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Jan 26 '18 at 11:00
  • This is not really what I am looking for, I was looking for a more consice solution. – Mr_road Jan 26 '18 at 11:23

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