6

When creating a cartesian product between two tables, is there any difference between CROSS APPLY and OUTER APPLY?

This may seem like a silly question given that without a relationship expressed between the tables, the right-hand table can't fail to satisfy the relation, but I'm respectful of what I don't know.

When I look at the execution plans with a simple test setup, they're identical [two index seeks feeding into Nested Loops (Inner Join)], but simple test setups can be deceptive.

Here's an example of what I mean (SQL Fiddle). The setup:

CREATE TABLE dbo.First (
    Id      INT IDENTITY(1, 1) PRIMARY KEY,
    Name    NVARCHAR(100)
);
GO
DECLARE @n INT = 1;
WHILE @n < 10000
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO dbo.First (Name) VALUES ('First' + CONVERT(NVARCHAR(100), @n));
    SET @n = @n + 1;
END
GO
CREATE INDEX IX__First__Name ON dbo.First(Name);
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.Second (
    Id      INT IDENTITY(1, 1) PRIMARY KEY,
    Name    NVARCHAR(100)
);
GO
DECLARE @n INT = 1;
WHILE @n < 10000
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO dbo.Second (Name) VALUES ('Second' + CONVERT(NVARCHAR(100), @n));
    SET @n = @n + 1;
END
GO
CREATE INDEX IX__Second__Name ON dbo.Second(Name);
GO

Using CROSS APPLY:

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304')
AND         Second.Name IN ('Second6543', 'Second517');

Using OUTER APPLY:

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
OUTER APPLY Second                                 -- <== Only change is here
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304')
AND         Second.Name IN ('Second6543', 'Second517');

...both of which give me the expected four rows.

Plus various variations where either, or both, IN clauses return no matches:

-- No match in First
SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('no match')
AND         Second.Name IN ('Second6543', 'Second517');

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
OUTER APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('no match')
AND         Second.Name IN ('Second6543', 'Second517');

-- No match in Second
SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304')
AND         Second.Name IN ('no match');

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
OUTER APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304')
AND         Second.Name IN ('no match');

-- No match in either
SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('no match')
AND         Second.Name IN ('no match');

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
OUTER APPLY Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('no match')
AND         Second.Name IN ('no match');

...all of which give me the expected zero rows.

3
  • 3
    I give it high odds that the answer will require the use of <!-- a filler comment or similar --> to meet the minimum character length, "no" being too short... ;-) Jan 26 '18 at 11:07
  • SELECT * FROM #A CROSS APPLY #A, SELECT * FROM #A OUTER APPLY #A and SELECT * FROM #A CROSS JOIN #A are all synonymous. The different syntaxes will yield no benefits (or detriments).
    – Larnu
    Jan 26 '18 at 11:21
  • With a condition like here OUTER APPLY Second WHERE First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304') AND Second.Name IN ('no match'); you are out-tricking the OUTER...
    – Shnugo
    Jan 26 '18 at 11:36
3

The difference comes into play when applied table or table-valued function has no records:

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
OUTER APPLY (SELECT * FROM Second WHERE Second.Id = -1) Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304');

2 rows returned


SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, Second.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY (SELECT * FROM Second WHERE Second.Id = -1) Second
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304');

0 rows returned

In OP's own words:

Not the way you're doing it, because conceptually you're filtering with WHERE after the APPLY (although the plans show the engine optimizing by doing it first); but if you explicitly filter first and then APPLY like this:

SELECT      First.Id AS FirstId, FilteredSecond.Id AS SecondId
FROM        First
CROSS APPLY (SELECT Id FROM Second WHERE Name IN ('xxx')) FilteredSecond 
WHERE       First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304');

you'd see the difference because you'd get rows with NULLs with the OUTER but no rows with the CROSS.

11
  • But that's not a cartesian product anymore...? Jan 26 '18 at 11:30
  • OK. Cartesian product of a table with an empty table would be empty for cross apply and would contain records from the first table with outer apply.
    – Y.B.
    Jan 26 '18 at 11:33
  • 2
    So your answer is "Not the way you're doing it, because conceptually you're applying the filtering with WHERE after the APPLY (although the plans show the engine optimizing by doing it first); but if you explicitly filter first and then APPLY (like this: SELECT First.Id AS FirstId, FilteredSecond.Id AS SecondId FROM First CROSS APPLY (SELECT Id FROM Second WHERE Name IN ('xxx')) FilteredSecond WHERE First.Name IN ('First253', 'First3304');, you'd see the difference because you'd get rows with NULLs with the OUTER but no rows with the CROSS." Is that basically what you're saying? Jan 26 '18 at 12:22
  • 1
    Obviously I know that reorganizing like that would result in rows with NULLs, but the main point being "Not the way you're doing it, because conceptually you're applying the filtering after the product." Jan 26 '18 at 12:24
  • 1
    @T.J.Crowder Yep. :-)
    – Y.B.
    Jan 26 '18 at 12:31
2

Think of CROSS APPLY as related to an INNER JOIN and OUTER APPLY as related to a LEFT JOIN.

  • CROSS / INNER will limit the result to rows from both sources, while
  • OUTER / LEFT will return all rows of the first table and NULLs in case of no related row in the second source.

The difference is that JOINs link two resultset over a relation condition, while APPLY is called row-wise with values of a current row.

You can use APPLY to create computed values out of row values or (which is the main purpose) to call a TVF with row-values as parameters. Often you can see APPLY in connection with XMLTypedVariable.nodes().

Some thoughts about execution In simple cases (like above) the engine will decide to walk the same paths. But with more complex scenarios the differences can be huge.

3
  • That's all sort of high-level description stuff, which is fine, but I'm not seeing how it addresses the question...? Jan 26 '18 at 11:31
  • @T.J.Crowder I see your point, but - as the OP uses conditions (WHERE clauses) the cartesian product might not be an each-with-each in any case. With a more complex query APPLY and JOIN will be handled differently. But it's hard to forecast, what the engine decides to be best...
    – Shnugo
    Jan 26 '18 at 11:34
  • 1
    @T.J.Crowder, sorry, did not realise that you are the "OP" :-D
    – Shnugo
    Jan 26 '18 at 11:37

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