4

I am wanting to log out some INFO logging in a method, and I am not wanting to use reflection to get hold of the Class and Method name.

For Error logging I can get the stack off the exception but how do I do this without an exception to get the StackTrace off?

  • Getting class and method information is basically what reflection is all about. Why do you want t avoid reflection in this case? It's like saying "I want to add two numbers without using the addition operator...". – Heinzi Jan 26 '18 at 11:35
  • Because, reflection is slow and expesive regarding performance, I was looking for a more efficent way. – Mr_road Jan 26 '18 at 11:36
  • That sounds like premature optimization to me. How fast is your current solution using reflection and what is your performance goal, i.e., how fast must the alternative solution be? – Heinzi Jan 26 '18 at 11:37
  • 3
    If you're writing this logging inside the methods have you considered using nameof()? – Ben Hall Jan 26 '18 at 11:38
  • I will have to do some profiling to answer that. Currently people have been hard coding the names in which is far from optimal, or using reflection, I am just wondering if there is a more optimal solution. – Mr_road Jan 26 '18 at 11:42
8

You can get the information about the caller using caller attributes

public void Log(Exception ex, [CallerFilePath]string callerFilePath = null, [CallerMemberName]string callerMemberName = null, [CallerLineNumber]int callerLineNumber = 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Message: {ex.Message} # File: {callerFilePath} # Line: {callerLineNumber} # Member: {callerMemberName}"  );
}

When the method is called the information about the caller will be passes to you by the compiler, you don't need to manually specify the parameters.

  • 2
    Witchcraft and wizardry ☉_☉ – Paul Suart Jan 26 '18 at 12:06
3

Using reflection to get this data is rather expensive.

|               Method |          Mean |      Error |     StdDev |
|--------------------- |--------------:|-----------:|-----------:|
| MethodNameReflection | 1,452.4709 ns | 24.5287 ns | 50.6561 ns |
|     MethodNameNameOf |     0.0543 ns |  0.0521 ns |  0.0678 ns |
|             TypeName |    14.4099 ns |  0.3964 ns |  0.7543 ns |
|   TypeNameReflection | 1,659.5866 ns | 33.1575 ns | 90.7682 ns |

And the Code (Using BenchmarkDotNet)

public class CurrentMethodInfoBenchmarks
{
    [Benchmark]
    public string MethodNameReflection() => MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name;

    [Benchmark]
    public string MethodNameNameOf() => nameof(MethodNameNameOf);

    [Benchmark]
    public string TypeName() => GetType().Name;

    [Benchmark]
    public string TypeNameReflection() => MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType.Name;
}

Using CallerMemberAttributes should also be similarly fast as like nameof() it will be a compile time constant.

  • 1
    What did you use to do the [Benchmark]? – Mr_road Jan 26 '18 at 12:02
  • 2
    Using github.com/dotnet/BenchmarkDotNet . – Alex Jan 26 '18 at 12:02
  • 2
    Expensive compared to what? If that logging takes an object and serializes it for example, those "large" numbers look tiny anyway... – nvoigt Jan 26 '18 at 12:51
0

you can use System.Environment.StackTrace property

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