12

I have seen that you can configure routing in ASP.NET Core 2.0 to generate lower case urls as described here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/45777372/83825

Using this:

services.AddRouting(options => options.LowercaseUrls = true);

However, although this is fine to GENERATE the urls, it doesn't appear to do anything to actually ENFORCE them, that is, redirect any urls that are NOT all lowercase to the corresponding lowercase url (preferably via 301 redirect).

I know people are accessing my site via differently cased urls, and I want them to all be lowercase, permanently.

Is doing a standard redirect via RewriteOptions and Regex the only way to do this? what would be the appropriate expression to do this:

var options = new RewriteOptions().AddRedirect("???", "????");

Or is there another way?

10

I appreciate this is many months old, however for people who may be looking for the same solution, you can add a complex redirect implementing IRule such as:

public class RedirectLowerCaseRule : IRule
{
    public int StatusCode { get; } = (int)HttpStatusCode.MovedPermanently;

    public void ApplyRule(RewriteContext context)
    {
        HttpRequest request = context.HttpContext.Request;
        PathString path = context.HttpContext.Request.Path;
        HostString host = context.HttpContext.Request.Host;

        if (path.HasValue && path.Value.Any(char.IsUpper) || host.HasValue && host.Value.Any(char.IsUpper))
        {
            HttpResponse response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.StatusCode = StatusCode;
            response.Headers[HeaderNames.Location] = (request.Scheme + "://" + host.Value + request.PathBase + request.Path).ToLower() + request.QueryString;
            context.Result = RuleResult.EndResponse; 
        }
        else
        {
            context.Result = RuleResult.ContinueRules;
        } 
    }
}

This can then be applied in your Startup.cs under Configure method as such:

new RewriteOptions().Add(new RedirectLowerCaseRule());

Hope this helps!

2
  • 2
    Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http has a StatusCodes enum that you can use in place of (int)HttpStatusCode.XXX. They include the status code number in each enum name, e.g., StatusCodes.Status301MovedPermanently. – CtrlDot Oct 14 '18 at 16:01
  • 3
    You don't want to lower case request.QueryString(). This will contain uppercase values that are legit. – Herb Stahl Nov 7 '18 at 22:21
0

Adding as answer because I can't comment (yet). This is an addition to Ben Maxfields answer.

Using his code http://www.example.org/Example/example would NOT be redirected, since PathBase was not checked for uppercase letters (even though it was used to build the new lowercase URI).

So based on his code, I ended up using this:

public class RedirectLowerCaseRule : IRule
{
    public int StatusCode { get; } = (int)HttpStatusCode.MovedPermanently;

    public void ApplyRule(RewriteContext context)
    {
        HttpRequest request = context.HttpContext.Request;
        PathString path = context.HttpContext.Request.Path;
        PathString pathbase = context.HttpContext.Request.PathBase;
        HostString host = context.HttpContext.Request.Host;

        if ((path.HasValue && path.Value.Any(char.IsUpper)) || (host.HasValue && host.Value.Any(char.IsUpper)) || (pathbase.HasValue && pathbase.Value.Any(char.IsUpper)))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Redirect should happen");

            HttpResponse response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.StatusCode = StatusCode;
            response.Headers[HeaderNames.Location] = (request.Scheme + "://" + host.Value + request.PathBase + request.Path).ToLower() + request.QueryString;
            context.Result = RuleResult.EndResponse;
        }
        else
        {
            context.Result = RuleResult.ContinueRules;
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    Please don't add "thank you" as an answer. Once you have sufficient reputation, you will be able to vote up questions and answers that you found helpful. - From Review – belwood May 1 '19 at 3:13
  • Thanks for your Review belwood! I edited my answer. It looks less like a comment now and i added an example. – DaBeSoft May 1 '19 at 5:55
0

Slightly different implementation, also inspired from this other thread.

public class RedirectLowerCaseRule : IRule
{
    public void ApplyRule(RewriteContext context)
    {
        HttpRequest request = context.HttpContext.Request;
        string url = request.Scheme + "://" + request.Host + request.PathBase + request.Path;
        bool isGet = request.Method.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("get");

        if ( isGet && url.Contains(".") == false && Regex.IsMatch(url, @"[A-Z]") )
        {
            HttpResponse response = context.HttpContext.Response;
            response.Clear();
            response.StatusCode = StatusCodes.Status301MovedPermanently;
            response.Headers[HeaderNames.Location] = url.ToLowerInvariant() + request.QueryString;
            context.Result = RuleResult.EndResponse;
        }
        else
        {
            context.Result = RuleResult.ContinueRules;
        }
    }
}

Changes made that I find useful:
Using ToLowerInvariant() instead of ToLower() (see possible issues here)
Keeping the port number in place.
Bypassing request methods other than GET.
Bypassing requests with a dot, assuming static files like js/css/images etc should keep any uppercase in place.
Using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http.StatusCodes.

0

My two cents... based on https://github.com/aspnet/AspNetCore/blob/master/src/Middleware/Rewrite/src/RedirectToWwwRule.cs

public class RedirectToLowercaseRule : IRule
{
    private readonly int _statusCode;

    public RedirectToLowercaseRule(int statusCode)
    {
        _statusCode = statusCode;
    }

    public void ApplyRule(RewriteContext context)
    {
        var req = context.HttpContext.Request;

        if (!req.Scheme.Any(char.IsUpper)
            && !req.Host.Value.Any(char.IsUpper)
            && !req.PathBase.Value.Any(char.IsUpper)
            && !req.Path.Value.Any(char.IsUpper))
        {
            context.Result = RuleResult.ContinueRules;
            return;
        }

        var newUrl = UriHelper.BuildAbsolute(req.Scheme.ToLowerInvariant(), new HostString(req.Host.Value.ToLowerInvariant()), req.PathBase.Value.ToLowerInvariant(), req.Path.Value.ToLowerInvariant(), req.QueryString);

        var response = context.HttpContext.Response;
        response.StatusCode = _statusCode;
        response.Headers[HeaderNames.Location] = newUrl;
        context.Result = RuleResult.EndResponse;
        context.Logger.RedirectedToLowercase();
    }
}

With extension methods:

public static class RewriteOptionsExtensions
{
    public static RewriteOptions AddRedirectToLowercase(this RewriteOptions options, int statusCode)
    {
        options.Add(new RedirectToLowercaseRule(statusCode));
        return options;
    }

    public static RewriteOptions AddRedirectToLowercase(this RewriteOptions options)
    {
        return AddRedirectToLowercase(options, StatusCodes.Status307TemporaryRedirect);
    }

    public static RewriteOptions AddRedirectToLowercasePermanent(this RewriteOptions options)
    {
        return AddRedirectToLowercase(options, StatusCodes.Status308PermanentRedirect);
    }
}

And logging:

internal static class MiddlewareLoggingExtensions
{
    private static readonly Action<ILogger, Exception> _redirectedToLowercase = LoggerMessage.Define(LogLevel.Information, new EventId(1, "RedirectedToLowercase"), "Request redirected to lowercase");

    public static void RedirectedToLowercase(this ILogger logger)
    {
        _redirectedToLowercase(logger, null);
    }
}

And usage:

app.UseRewriter(new RewriteOptions()
    .AddRedirectToLowercase());

Other considerations are the choice of status codes. I've used 307 and 308 in the extension methods as these prevent the request method being changed (e.g. from GET to POST) during the request, however if you want to allow that behaviour you can use 301 and 302. See What's the difference between HTTP 301 and 308 status codes? for further information.

-2

Are you sure you want a redirect? If not, and your goal is that there is no such thing as uppercase in your host and path, you can use the following IRule. This assures me that wherever I look at the path in the pipeline that it is lowercase.

public class RewriteLowerCaseRule : IRule
{
    public void ApplyRule(RewriteContext context)
    {
        var request = context.HttpContext.Request;
        var host = request.Host;
        var pathBase = request.PathBase;
        var path = request.Path;
        if (host.HasValue)
        {
            if (host.Port == null)
            {
                request.Host = new HostString(host.Host.ToLower());
            }
            else
            {
                request.Host = new HostString(host.Host.ToLower(), (int) host.Port);
            }
        }

        if (pathBase.HasValue)
        {
            request.PathBase = new PathString(pathBase.Value.ToLower());
        }

        if (path.HasValue)
        {
            request.Path = new PathString(path.Value.ToLower());
            request.PathBase = new PathString(pathBase.Value.ToLower());
        }

        context.Result = RuleResult.ContinueRules;
    }
}

Usage:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    app.UseRewriter(new RewriteOptions().Add(new RewriteLowerCaseRule()));
    ...
}
2
  • Question specifically states the need for a permanent 301 redirect from urls containing any upper case characters to lower case. This answer doesn't do that and also doesn't really offer anything new than what was in the previous answer. I'm also not sure in what situation you would need to have non enforced lower case urls but have them forced lowercase when accessing them in the backend, this seems to be a bit of a code smell that could cause hard to find issues down the line if forgotten about or unknown to other developers on a team. – Ben Maxfield Nov 8 '18 at 9:42
  • This is a perfectly good alternative to what the question is trying to accomplish. That site is executing code to evaluate if something that came in was uppercase, and then further wasting internet resources by issuing a wasteful permanent redirect which then evaluates it again just to make sure. Knowing that it is impossible to stop upper case requests coming in, the site should eat it, fix it, and let the request through. So the correct answer here is don't do the permanent redirect. – Herb Stahl Nov 21 '18 at 19:19

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