124

Suppose I have two enums as described below in Typescript, then How do I merge them

enum Mammals {
    Humans,
    Bats,
    Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
    Snakes,
    Alligators,
    Lizards
}

export default Mammals & Reptiles // For Illustration purpose, Consider both the Enums have been merged.

Now, when I import the exported value in another file, I should be able to access values from both the enums.

import animalTypes from "./animalTypes"

animalTypes.Humans //valid

animalTypes.Snakes // valid

How can I achieve such functionality in TypeScript?

0

11 Answers 11

215

Problems with the merge:

  • same values => values are overwritten
  • same keys => keys are overwritten

  • ❌ Enums with same values (=> values are overwritten)

enum AA1 {
  aKey, // = 0
  bKey // = 1
}
enum BB1 {
  cKey, // = 0
  dKey // = 1
}
  • ❌ Enums with the same keys (=> keys are overwritten)
enum AA2 {
  aKey = 1
}
enum BB2 {
  aKey = 2
}
  • ✅ Good
enum AA3 {
  aKey, // = 0
  bKey // = 1
}
enum BB3 {
  cKey = 2,
  dKey // = 3
}
  • ✅ Also Good
enum AA4 {
  aKey = 'Hello',
  bKey = 0,
  cKey // = 1
}
enum BB4 {
  dKey = 2,
  eKey = 'Hello',
  fKey = 'World'
}

Note: aKey = 'Hello' and eKey = 'Hello' work because the enum with a string value doesn't has this value as key

// For aKey = 'Hello', key is working
type aa4aKey = AA4.aKey; // = AA4.aKey
// value is not.
type aa4aValue = AA4.Hello; // ❌ Namespace 'AA4' has no exported member 'Hello'
type aa4aValue2 = AA4['Hello']; // ❌ Property 'Hello' does not exist on type 'AA4'

console.log(AA4); // { 0: 'bKey', 1: 'cKey', aKey: 'Hello', bKey: 0, cKey: 1 }
console.log(BB4); // { 2: 'dKey', dKey: 2, eKey: 'Hello', fKey: 'World' }

The merge

  • ❌ using union types
type AABB1 = AA4 | BB4; // = AA4 | BB4
type AABB1key = AABB1['aKey']; // = never
type AABB1key2 = AABB1.aKey; // ❌ 'AABB1' only refers to a type, but is being used as a namespace here. ts(2702)
  • ❌ using intersection types
type AABB1 = AA4 & BB4; // = never
type AABB1key = AABB1['aKey']; // = never
  • ✅ using intersection types with typeof
type AABB2 = (typeof AA4) & (typeof BB4); // = typeof AA4 & typeof BB4
type AABB2key = AABB2['aKey']; // = AA4.aKey
  • ✅ using js copy
const aabb1 = { ...AA4, ...BB4 };
const aabb2 = Object.assign({}, AA4, BB4); // also work
// aabb1 = {
// 0: 'bKey',
// 1: 'cKey',
// 2: 'dKey',
// aKey: 'Hello',
// bKey: 0,
// cKey: 1,
// dKey: 2,
// eKey: 'Hello',
// fKey: 'World' }
  • ✅ using typeof with a js copy
const aabb = { ...AA4, ...BB4 };
type TypeofAABB = typeof aabb;
// type TypeofAABB = {
// [x: number]: string;
// dKey: BB4.dKey;
// eKey: BB4.eKey;
// fKey: BB4.fKey;
// aKey: AA4.aKey;
// bKey: AA4.bKey;
// cKey: AA4.cKey;
// };

Tip: you can use the same name for a type and a value

const merged = { ...AA4, ...BB4 };
type merged = typeof merged;

const aValue = merged.aKey;
type aType = merged['aKey'];

Your case

If you want to merge your 2 enums you have ~3 choices:

1. Using string enums

enum Mammals {
  Humans = 'Humans',
  Bats = 'Bats',
  Dolphins = 'Dolphins'
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes = 'Snakes',
  Alligators = 'Alligators',
  Lizards = 'Lizards'
}

export const Animals = { ...Mammals, ...Reptiles };
export type Animals = typeof Animals;

2. Using unique numbers

enum Mammals {
  Humans = 0,
  Bats,
  Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes = 2,
  Alligators,
  Lizards
}

export const Animals = { ...Mammals, ...Reptiles };
export type Animals = typeof Animals;

3. Using nested enums

enum Mammals {
  Humans,
  Bats,
  Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes,
  Alligators,
  Lizards
}

export const Animals = { Mammals, Reptiles };
export type Animals = typeof Animals;

const bats = Animals.Mammals.Bats; // = 1
const alligators = Animals.Reptiles.Alligators; // = 1

Note: you can also merge the nested enums with the following code. Take care to NOT have duplicated values if you do that!

type Animal = {
  [K in keyof Animals]: {
    [K2 in keyof Animals[K]]: Animals[K][K2]
  }[keyof Animals[K]]
}[keyof Animals];

const animal: Animal = 0 as any;

switch (animal) {
  case Animals.Mammals.Bats:
  case Animals.Mammals.Dolphins:
  case Animals.Mammals.Humans:
  case Animals.Reptiles.Alligators:
  case Animals.Reptiles.Lizards:
  case Animals.Reptiles.Snakes:
    break;
  default: {
    const invalid: never = animal; // no error
  }
}
9
  • 2
    I can't use the nested enum with a switch
    – lolelo
    Aug 27, 2019 at 18:16
  • 1
    @lolelo You can do it in a little hackish way with typescript. Here is a sample (also in edited answer):pastiebin.com/5d681d2cde9cc Aug 29, 2019 at 18:42
  • 2
    @ShashankVivek basically copy/pasting emojis (symbols section). They are a great ressource for written explanations :) Sep 23, 2019 at 15:09
  • 12
    for example 1 and 2, instead of export type Animals = typeof Animals; you should be doing export type Animals = Mammals | Reptiles; so that mammal is assignable to animal Feb 27, 2020 at 7:04
  • 1
    It appears the intersection with typeof doesn't work for TS 4.8: typescriptlang.org/…. The last version it worked with was 3.8.3: typescriptlang.org/play?ts=3.8.3#code/… Sep 12, 2022 at 19:46
88

If you want something behaving like an enum from the way you consume it, you could still use merged object in javascript.

enum Mammals {
    Humans = 'Humans',
    Bats = 'Bats',
    Dolphins = 'Dolphins',
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes = 'Snakes',
  Alligators = 'Alligators',
  Lizards = 'Lizards',
}

const Animals = {
   ...Mammals,
   ...Reptiles,
}

type Animals = Mammals | Reptiles

Then you could use Animals.Snakes or Animals.Dolphins and both should be properly typed and work as an enum

6
  • haven't really thought this angle... will try it. Jul 24, 2018 at 16:31
  • 4
    add type Animals = Mammals | Reptiles; from @Porkishka answer and it works and passes type checks
    – artemnih
    May 16, 2019 at 21:42
  • how would I go about exporting Animals now?
    – towc
    Jan 21, 2020 at 10:50
  • 2
    if you export both the variable and the type you should not have any issues Apr 28, 2020 at 16:07
  • Thanks for this answer - it's short and to the point, and it works...mostly. It suffers from not being able to access the types via const foo: Animals["Snakes"]. That can be fixed if you change the last line to type Animals = typeof Animals; Sep 20, 2022 at 16:18
23

Enums, interfaces and types - a working solution for merging enums

What's confusing here is types vs. values.

  • If you define a value (let, const etc.) it will have a value plus some computed but not separately named type.
  • If you define a type or interface, it will create a named type but that will not be outputted or considered in the final JS in any way. It only helps when writing your app.
  • If you create an enum in Typescript, it creates a static type name that you can use plus a real object outputted to JS that you can use.

From the TS handbook:

Using an enum is simple: just access any member as a property off of the enum itself, and declare types using the name of the enum.

So, if you Object.assign() two enums, it will create a new, merged value (object), but not a new named type.

Since it's not an enum anymore, you lose the advantage of having a value and a named type, but you can still create a separate type name as a workaround.

Fortunately, you can have the same name for the value and the type, and TS will import both if you export them.

// This creates a merged enum, but not a type
const Animals = Object.assign({}, Mammals, Reptiles);

// Workaround: create a named type (typeof Animals won't work here!)
type Animals = Mammals | Reptiles;

TS playground link

1
  • I appreciate about the workaround. typeof didn't work for me
    – Velidan
    Sep 19, 2023 at 16:04
7

A TypeScript enum not only contains the keys you define but also the numerical inverse, so for example:

Mammals.Humans === 0 && Mammals[0] === 'Humans'

Now, if you try to merge them -- for example with Object#assign -- you'd end up with two keys having the same numerical value:

const AnimalTypes = Object.assign({}, Mammals, Reptiles);
console.log(AnimalTypes.Humans === AnimalTypes.Snakes) // true

And I suppose that's not what you want.

One way to prevent this, is to manually assign the values to the enum and make sure that they are different:

enum Mammals {
    Humans = 0,
    Bats = 1,
    Dolphins = 2
}

enum Reptiles {
    Snakes = 3,
    Alligators = 4,
    Lizards = 5
}

or less explicit but otherwise equivalent:

enum Mammals {
    Humans,
    Bats,
    Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
    Snakes = 3,
    Alligators,
    Lizards
}

Anyway, as long as you make sure that the enums you merge have different key/value sets you can merge them with Object#assign.

Playground Demo

3
  • 1
    The merging seems to works, But I cannot use that in an interface. Playground Demo below. @Tao Jan 27, 2018 at 17:49
  • TS Playground Demo Jan 27, 2018 at 18:05
  • 1
    I guess the problem is that the merged object isn't an enum anymore for TypeScript although it behaves the same. As a workaraound you can write typeof AnimalTypes.Bats which will resolve to Mammals.Bats. Maybe someone else knows a better way.
    – Tao
    Jan 27, 2018 at 19:17
6

You need to use string ids for enum values and right export types:

enum Mammals {
  Humans = 'humans',
  Bats = 'bats',
  Dolphins = 'dolphins',
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes = 'snakes',
  Alligators = 'alligators',
  Lizards = 'lizards',
}

export const Animals = { ...Mammals, ...Reptiles };
type TAnimalsKeys = keyof typeof Animals;
export type TAnimal = typeof Animals[TAnimalsKeys];
4

I'd say the proper way to do it would be defining a new type:

enum Mammals {
    Humans = 'Humans',
    Bats = 'Bats',
    Dolphins = 'Dolphins',
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes = 'Snakes',
  Alligators = 'Alligators',
  Lizards = 'Lizards',
}

type Animals = Mammals | Reptiles;
1
  • 10
    The problem with this approach is, that you cannot select any value from it. Error: Animals then. Animals only refers to a type, but is being used as a value here
    – dave0688
    Jul 18, 2020 at 11:47
3

A very simple solution, copied from here

For two different set of enums:

enum WeatherType1 {
  CLOUDY,
  SUNNY,
  RAIN
}
enum WeatherType2 {
 STORM
}

You can then just use: type MyMergedEnum = WeatherType1 & WeatherType2; and then follow an approach of const foo:MyMergedEnum = WeatherType1.RAIN // or WeatherType2.STORM

please note this is not a new enum, just a type.

2
  • 1. MyMergedEnum will only be a type, not an enum (as the name suggests), but that's easily addressed with a rename. 2. This may not work as expected for distinct Numeric enums (unless one carefully manages initialization, e.g. EnumA { aFirst, aSecond } and EnumB { bFirst = 2, bSecond, bThird }. Without initializing bFirst to the number of members in EnumA, the resulting type would be equivalent to 0 | 1 | 2 (which is the same as EnumB). With initialization, the resulting type is equivalent to 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4. 3. The answer doesn't actually address the OP.
    – Rax Adaam
    Jul 23, 2023 at 18:12
  • 1
    thanks Rax, I have updated the answer since what you say its true, the comment doesnt directly solve the question.
    – Alberto S.
    Jul 25, 2023 at 15:57
1

To merge the following enums,

enum Mammals {
    Humans,
    Bats,
    Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
    Snakes,
    Alligators,
    Lizards
}

we can do by the following way,

/** Animals */
const Animals = {
   ...Mammals,
   ...Reptiles
}
export type Animals = (typeof Animals)[keyof typeof Animals]

From the above, you can access the Animals master enum like below,

Animals.Humans /** accessible now */
0

Tagging on a (maybe better) way to do this:

export enum Fruit {
  COCONUT = "COCO",
  BANANA = "BANANA",
}

export enum Vegetable {
  BROCCOLI = "BROCCOLI",
}

export const Foods = {
  ...Fruit,
  ...Vegetable,
};

export type Food = keyof typeof Foods;

Make sure the strings you defined the enums with don't collide. Food is the type, Foods is the underlying map defining the enum (which normally js would make for you). What's cool about this way is:

Foods[Food.BROCCOLI] is the string "BROCCOLI", just like how Fruit[Fruit.COCONUT] is the string "COCO", and with these types the compiler knows that.

So combining Foods and Food you get the standard enum behavior.

0
enum Mammals {
  Humans,
  Bats,
  Dolphins
}

enum Reptiles {
  Snakes,
  Alligators,
  Lizards
}

enum Animals {
  Humans = Mammals.Humans,
  Bats = Mammals.Bats,
  Dolphins = Mammals.Dolphins,
  Snakes = Reptiles.Snakes,
  Alligators = Reptiles.Alligators,
  Lizards = Reptiles.Lizards
}

export default Animals
-1

Try this enumerations example ------

Enums or enumerations are a new data type supported in TypeScript

enum PrintMedia {
    Newspaper = 1,
    Newsletter,
    Magazine,
    Book
}

function getMedia(mediaName: string): PrintMedia {
    if (mediaName === 'Forbes' || mediaName === 'Outlook') {
        return PrintMedia.Magazine;
    }
 }

let mediaType: PrintMedia = getMedia('Forbes');

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