TF Map function supports parallel calls. I'm seeing no improvements passing num_parallel_calls to map. With num_parallel_calls=1 and num_parallel_calls=10, there is no improvement in performance run time. Here is a simple code

import time
def test_two_custom_function_parallelism(num_parallel_calls=1, batch=False, 
    batch_size=1, repeat=1, num_iterations=10):
    tf.reset_default_graph()
    start = time.time()
    dataset_x = tf.data.Dataset.range(1000).map(lambda x: tf.py_func(
        squarer, [x], [tf.int64]), 
        num_parallel_calls=num_parallel_calls).repeat(repeat)
    if batch:
        dataset_x = dataset_x.batch(batch_size)
    dataset_y = tf.data.Dataset.range(1000).map(lambda x: tf.py_func(
       squarer, [x], [tf.int64]), num_parallel_calls=num_parallel_calls).repeat(repeat)
    if batch:
        dataset_y = dataset_x.batch(batch_size)
        X = dataset_x.make_one_shot_iterator().get_next()
        Y = dataset_x.make_one_shot_iterator().get_next()

    with tf.Session() as sess:
        sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
        i = 0
        while True:
            try:
                res = sess.run([X, Y])
                i += 1
                if i == num_iterations:
                    break
            except tf.errors.OutOfRangeError as e:
                pass

Here are the timings

%timeit test_two_custom_function_parallelism(num_iterations=1000, 
 num_parallel_calls=2, batch_size=2, batch=True)
370ms

%timeit test_two_custom_function_parallelism(num_iterations=1000, 
 num_parallel_calls=5, batch_size=2, batch=True)
372ms

%timeit test_two_custom_function_parallelism(num_iterations=1000, 
 num_parallel_calls=10, batch_size=2, batch=True)
384ms

I used %timeit in Juypter notebook. What am I doing it wrong?

The problem here is that the only operation in the Dataset.map() function is a tf.py_func() op. This op calls back into the local Python interpreter to run a function in the same process. Increasing num_parallel_calls will increase the number of TensorFlow threads that attempt to call back into Python concurrently. However, Python has something called the "Global Interpreter Lock" that prevents more than one thread from executing code at once. As a result, all but one of these multiple parallel calls will be blocked waiting to acquire the Global Interpreter Lock, and there will be almost no parallel speedup (and perhaps even a slight slowdown).

Your code example didn't include the definition of the squarer() function, but it might be possible to replace tf.py_func() with pure TensorFlow ops, which are implemented in C++, and can execute in parallel. For example—and just guessing by the name—you could replace it with an invocation of tf.square(x), and you might then enjoy some parallel speedup.

Note however that if the amount of work in the function is small, like squaring a single integer, the speedup might not be very large. Parallel Dataset.map() is more useful for heavier operations, like parsing a TFRecord with tf.parse_single_example() or performing some image distortions as part of a data augmentation pipeline.

  • Nice answer, I have been wondering about how tf.py_func works with num_parallel_calls! BTW -- the GIL link seems broken. – mikkola Feb 14 at 6:38
  • Sorry about that: fixed the link! – mrry Feb 14 at 6:41
  • After replacing 'th.py_func()' with 'tf.square', increasing num_parallel_calls do not speedup obviously. maybe overhead time is larger than 'tf.square'(or 'tf.py_func') – quanly_mc Jul 11 at 5:31
  • @quanly_mc do you have futher conclusion about this, I met the same problem, and doesn't know how to handle it – crafet Aug 24 at 12:51
  • @crafet When mapping operation cost long time, increasing num_parallel_calls speedup obviously. An example was provided in my answer. – quanly_mc Aug 27 at 1:40

The reason maybe the squarer cost less time than overhead time. I modified the code with adding a quarter function which cost 2 seconds. Then the parameter num_parallel_calls works as expected. Here is the complete code:

import tensorflow as tf
import time
def squarer(x):
  t0 = time.time()
  while time.time() - t0 < 2:
    y = x ** 2
  return y

def test_two_custom_function_parallelism(num_parallel_calls=1,
                                         batch=False,
                                         batch_size=1,
                                         repeat=1,
                                         num_iterations=10):
  tf.reset_default_graph()
  start = time.time()
  dataset_x = tf.data.Dataset.range(1000).map(
      lambda x: tf.py_func(squarer, [x], [tf.int64]),
      num_parallel_calls=num_parallel_calls).repeat(repeat)
  # dataset_x = dataset_x.prefetch(4)
  if batch:
    dataset_x = dataset_x.batch(batch_size)
  dataset_y = tf.data.Dataset.range(1000).map(
      lambda x: tf.py_func(squarer, [x], [tf.int64]),
      num_parallel_calls=num_parallel_calls).repeat(repeat)
  # dataset_y = dataset_y.prefetch(4)
  if batch:
    dataset_y = dataset_x.batch(batch_size)
    X = dataset_x.make_one_shot_iterator().get_next()
    Y = dataset_x.make_one_shot_iterator().get_next()

  with tf.Session() as sess:
    sess.run(tf.global_variables_initializer())
    i = 0
    while True:
      t0 = time.time()
      try:
        res = sess.run([X, Y])
        print(res)
        i += 1
        if i == num_iterations:
          break
      except tf.errors.OutOfRangeError as e:
        print(i)
        break
      print('step elapse: %.4f' % (time.time() - t0))
  print('total time: %.4f' % (time.time() - start))


test_two_custom_function_parallelism(
    num_iterations=4, num_parallel_calls=1, batch_size=2, batch=True, repeat=10)
test_two_custom_function_parallelism(
    num_iterations=4, num_parallel_calls=10, batch_size=2, batch=True, repeat=10)

the output is:

[(array([0, 1]),), (array([0, 1]),)]
step elapse: 4.0204
[(array([4, 9]),), (array([4, 9]),)]
step elapse: 4.0836
[(array([16, 25]),), (array([16, 25]),)]
step elapse: 4.1529
[(array([36, 49]),), (array([36, 49]),)]
total time: 16.3374
[(array([0, 1]),), (array([0, 1]),)]
step elapse: 2.2139
[(array([4, 9]),), (array([4, 9]),)]
step elapse: 0.0585
[(array([16, 25]),), (array([16, 25]),)]
step elapse: 0.0469
[(array([36, 49]),), (array([36, 49]),)]
total time: 2.5317

So I am confused with the effect of "Global Interpreter Lock" mentioned by @mrry.

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