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i want to add column inside table. column name is name,surname how i can add this column inside already created table? like alter table MyTable ADD name,surname Varchar(100) ???

  • This sounds like an XY problem. Why are you trying to cram two values into a single column? – Chris Jan 28 '18 at 12:38
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    I see no genuine reason to do this. – Ravi Jan 28 '18 at 12:38
  • my columns name is (aaaa,bbb) i whant to add this as one column name – Rezo Kobaidze Jan 28 '18 at 12:42
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    If you insist on making everything more cumbersome: weird column names just need to be wrapped in backticks. (Again / future users: don't do this. Just a literal answer to the question title.) – mario Jan 28 '18 at 13:09
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    This idea is beyond terrible. Don't do it. – Strawberry Jan 28 '18 at 13:10
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Add two separate columns:

alter table mytable add name varchar(100);
alter table mytable add surname varchar(100);

Simply concatenate the values together if you want them in a list:

select concat_ws(', ', surname, name) as surname_name

Don't combine them into a single column.

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  • my columns name is aaaaa,bbbbb its coma separated – Rezo Kobaidze Jan 28 '18 at 12:41
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    @RezoKobaidze . . . Break it up at the application layer. It contains two separate elements. Each should have its own column (or row). – Gordon Linoff Jan 28 '18 at 12:42
  • i know but is it possible to ADD column that has comma separated name??? – Rezo Kobaidze Jan 28 '18 at 12:43
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    @RezoKobaidze . . . You can use backticks. They are the escape character in MySQL. But don't do it! If you want two parts to a name, separate them with an underscore: name_surname. That makes it much easier to query in the future. – Gordon Linoff Jan 28 '18 at 12:47
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ALTER TABLE tablename ADD COLUMN `name,age` VARCHAR(45) NULL DEFAULT NULL;

Name, age has to be between negation symbols. I type it here but it is not showing up on UI after I post it. Here ` is the one above tab on keyboard.

Anything inside those negation symbols is considered as a column name.

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