14

Consider the following code in C#.

public int Foo(int a)
{
    // ...
}

// in some other method

int? x = 0;

x = Foo(x);

The last line will return a compilation error cannot convert from 'int?' to 'int' which is fair enough. However, for example in Haskell there is Maybe which is a counterpart to Nullable in C#. Since Maybe is a Functor I would be able to apply Foo to x using fmap. Does C# have a similar mechanism?

  • The easiest way is if (x.hasValue) x = (int?) f(x.value)... – user202729 Jan 28 '18 at 15:50
  • 1
    @user202729 - There is no reason for the (int?) return cast. – Henk Holterman Jan 28 '18 at 15:58
  • I guess Haskell uses type inference there to make Foo have the type a -> a. But if this was an explicit int -> int (or Just int -> Just int?), I’m sure that Haskell also wouldn’t allow you to pass a Maybe int in that case. And that’s exactly what C# does here: The function cannot take a nullable int, so you have to pass it an actual int. – poke Jan 28 '18 at 16:07
  • Nullable<T> does not have a method like fmap(or in the csharp world: Select). You can quite easily add an extension method for it, or even roll out your own option-type (and you can even make it so it can take any T, not just value-types). @poke haskell has a generic function fmap with the signature Functor f => (a -> b) -> (f a -> f b), so you can use it to turn a function Int -> Int to a function Maybe Int -> Maybe Int. It's basically the same as Select() you know in LINQ, just with generalized types(works for any Functor) – M. Aroosi Jan 28 '18 at 16:09
  • 1
    Yes, that's the signature for fmap for the Nullable<T> type(if it was an instance method), basically the same as Willem's answer. The signature is just like Select, except instead of IEnumerable we have Nullable. If you do use the name Select you can even use it as a LINQ query(and maybe add Where and SelectMany). Here's a github repo I found where someone rolled out his own Maybe type – M. Aroosi Jan 28 '18 at 16:20
16

We can implement such functionality ourselves:

public static class FuncUtils {

    public static Nullable<R> Fmap<T, R>(this Nullable<T> x, Func<T, R> f)
        where T : struct
        where R : struct {
        if(x != null) {
            return f(x.Value);
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }

}

Then we can use it with:

int? x = 0;
x = x.Fmap(Foo);

It will thus call the function Foo if x is not null. It will wrap the result back in a Nullable<R>. In case x is null, it will return a Nullable<R> with null.

Or we can write a more equivalent function (like fmap in Haskell) where we have a function Fmap that takes as input a Func<T, R> and returns a Func<Nullable<T>, Nullable<R>> so that we can then use it for a certain x:

public static class FuncUtils {

    public static Func<Nullable<T>, Nullable<R>> Fmap<T, R>(Func<T, R> f)
        where T : struct
        where R : struct {
        return delegate (Nullable<T> x) {
            if(x != null) {
                return f(x.Value);
            } else {
                return null;
            }
        };
    }

}

We can then use it like:

var fmapf = FuncUtils.Fmap<int, int>(Foo);
fmapf(null);  // -> null
fmapf(12);    // -> Foo(12) as int?
  • Really? Can you call x.Fmap(foo) if x is null. Surely x dot anything will throw a null pointer exception if x is null? – Adam Jan 28 '18 at 20:32
  • 2
    @Adam: the above is with Nullable<T> types (so if the type is int?, etc.). And furthermore no! Not every null.foo(..) will throw a null pointer exception, since you can introduce extension methods. – Willem Van Onsem Jan 28 '18 at 20:33
  • 2
    @Adam That's actually one of the really cool features of extension methods - externally, they look like instance methods, but they can be called on null objects without error! 'course it means that the extension method itself needs to check if the this parameter (which has a name instead of "this") is null or not. – Nat Jan 29 '18 at 1:27
  • Why use the delegate syntax instead of a lambda? Is there a functional difference? – jpmc26 Jan 29 '18 at 2:14
  • 2
    @Nat I don't consider that a "really cool feature" but an "unfortunate side effect". The introduction of extension methods changes some pretty fundamental properties of the language. Before extension methods, you could rely on the fact that after x.Foo(), x could be assumed non-null. – Derek Elkins Jan 29 '18 at 2:59
9

Functor

Not only can you turn Nullable<T> into a functor, but C# actually understands functors, enabling you to write something like this:

x = from x1 in x
    select Foo(x1);

If you prefer method call syntax, that's also possible:

x = x.Select(Foo);

In both cases, you need an extension method like this:

public static TResult? Select<T, TResult>(
    this T? source,
    Func<T, TResult> selector) where T : struct where TResult : struct
{
    if (!source.HasValue)
        return null;

    return new TResult?(selector(source.Value));
}

Monad

Not only does C# understand functors, but it understands monads as well. Add these SelectMany overloads as well:

public static TResult? SelectMany<T, TResult>(
    this T? source,
    Func<T, TResult?> selector)
    where T : struct
    where TResult : struct
{
    if (!source.HasValue)
        return null;

    return selector(source.Value);
}

public static TResult? SelectMany<T, U, TResult>(
    this T? source,
    Func<T, U?> k,
    Func<T, U, TResult> s)
    where T : struct
    where TResult : struct
    where U : struct
{
    return source
        .SelectMany(x => k(x)
            .SelectMany(y => new TResult?(s(x, y))));
}

This enables you to write queries like this:

var result = from x in (int?)6
             from y in (int?)7
             select x * y;

Here, result is an int? containing the number 42.

4

If you have an extension method:

public int Foo(this int a)
{
    // ...
}

you can do:

// in some other method

int? x = 0;

x = x?.Foo();

The ?. operator will ensure Foo is called only if x is not null. If x is null, it is not called (a null of the return type is used instead).


Otherwise, the canonical way to write it is naturally:

x = x.HasValue ? Foo(x.Value) : (int?)null;

Of course you can create your own Maybe infrastructure if you will (Willem Van Onsem's answer).

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