397

I would like to have a single template that once and for all takes care of pretty-printing all STL containers via operator<<. In pseudo code, I'm looking for something like this:

template<container C, class T, String delim = ", ", String open = "[", String close = "]">
std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & o, const C<T> & x)
{
    o << open;
    // for (typename C::const_iterator i = x.begin(); i != x.end(); i++) /* Old-school */
    for (auto i = x.begin(); i != x.end(); i++)
    {
        if (i != x.begin()) o << delim;
        o << *i;
    }
    o << close;
    return o;
}

Now I've seen plenty of template magic here on SO that I never thought possible, so I'm wondering if anyone can suggest something that would match all containers C. Maybe something trait-ish that can figure out if something has the necessary iterator?

Many thanks!


Update: I have created a public project on GitHub with a solution.

  • Your code won't work. there is no such keyword as container C – the_drow Jan 31 '11 at 11:46
  • 32
    @the_drow: It looks like OP knows that already. They're just indicating what they are looking for. – Marcelo Cantos Jan 31 '11 at 11:47
  • Indeed, I only gave a "moral" pseudo-code example. (I also left out the return type, I'm noting.) To be sure, I don't even know how best to make the delimiters changeable. – Kerrek SB Jan 31 '11 at 11:53
  • 1
    Another alternative would be putting the operators in the pretty_print namespace and providing a wrapper for the user to use when printing. From the user point of view: std::cout << pretty_print(v); (probably with a different name). Then you can provide the operator in the same namespace as the wrapper, and it can then expand to pretty printing anything you want. You could also enhance the wrapper allowing for optionally defining the separator to use within each call (rather than using traits that force the same choice for the whole application)\ – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 6 '13 at 15:48
  • 3
    Please make your "update" answers into actual answers instead of having a humungous question. – einpoklum Mar 21 '19 at 10:51

10 Answers 10

84

This solution was inspired by Marcelo's solution, with a few changes:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <type_traits>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

// This works similar to ostream_iterator, but doesn't print a delimiter after the final item
template<typename T, typename TChar = char, typename TCharTraits = std::char_traits<TChar> >
class pretty_ostream_iterator : public std::iterator<std::output_iterator_tag, void, void, void, void>
{
public:
    typedef TChar char_type;
    typedef TCharTraits traits_type;
    typedef std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits> ostream_type;

    pretty_ostream_iterator(ostream_type &stream, const char_type *delim = NULL)
        : _stream(&stream), _delim(delim), _insertDelim(false)
    {
    }

    pretty_ostream_iterator<T, TChar, TCharTraits>& operator=(const T &value)
    {
        if( _delim != NULL )
        {
            // Don't insert a delimiter if this is the first time the function is called
            if( _insertDelim )
                (*_stream) << _delim;
            else
                _insertDelim = true;
        }
        (*_stream) << value;
        return *this;
    }

    pretty_ostream_iterator<T, TChar, TCharTraits>& operator*()
    {
        return *this;
    }

    pretty_ostream_iterator<T, TChar, TCharTraits>& operator++()
    {
        return *this;
    }

    pretty_ostream_iterator<T, TChar, TCharTraits>& operator++(int)
    {
        return *this;
    }
private:
    ostream_type *_stream;
    const char_type *_delim;
    bool _insertDelim;
};

#if _MSC_VER >= 1400

// Declare pretty_ostream_iterator as checked
template<typename T, typename TChar, typename TCharTraits>
struct std::_Is_checked_helper<pretty_ostream_iterator<T, TChar, TCharTraits> > : public std::tr1::true_type
{
};

#endif // _MSC_VER >= 1400

namespace std
{
    // Pre-declarations of container types so we don't actually have to include the relevant headers if not needed, speeding up compilation time.
    // These aren't necessary if you do actually include the headers.
    template<typename T, typename TAllocator> class vector;
    template<typename T, typename TAllocator> class list;
    template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> class set;
    template<typename TKey, typename TValue, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> class map;
}

// Basic is_container template; specialize to derive from std::true_type for all desired container types
template<typename T> struct is_container : public std::false_type { };

// Mark vector as a container
template<typename T, typename TAllocator> struct is_container<std::vector<T, TAllocator> > : public std::true_type { };

// Mark list as a container
template<typename T, typename TAllocator> struct is_container<std::list<T, TAllocator> > : public std::true_type { };

// Mark set as a container
template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> struct is_container<std::set<T, TTraits, TAllocator> > : public std::true_type { };

// Mark map as a container
template<typename TKey, typename TValue, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> struct is_container<std::map<TKey, TValue, TTraits, TAllocator> > : public std::true_type { };

// Holds the delimiter values for a specific character type
template<typename TChar>
struct delimiters_values
{
    typedef TChar char_type;
    const TChar *prefix;
    const TChar *delimiter;
    const TChar *postfix;
};

// Defines the delimiter values for a specific container and character type
template<typename T, typename TChar>
struct delimiters
{
    static const delimiters_values<TChar> values; 
};

// Default delimiters
template<typename T> struct delimiters<T, char> { static const delimiters_values<char> values; };
template<typename T> const delimiters_values<char> delimiters<T, char>::values = { "{ ", ", ", " }" };
template<typename T> struct delimiters<T, wchar_t> { static const delimiters_values<wchar_t> values; };
template<typename T> const delimiters_values<wchar_t> delimiters<T, wchar_t>::values = { L"{ ", L", ", L" }" };

// Delimiters for set
template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> struct delimiters<std::set<T, TTraits, TAllocator>, char> { static const delimiters_values<char> values; };
template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> const delimiters_values<char> delimiters<std::set<T, TTraits, TAllocator>, char>::values = { "[ ", ", ", " ]" };
template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> struct delimiters<std::set<T, TTraits, TAllocator>, wchar_t> { static const delimiters_values<wchar_t> values; };
template<typename T, typename TTraits, typename TAllocator> const delimiters_values<wchar_t> delimiters<std::set<T, TTraits, TAllocator>, wchar_t>::values = { L"[ ", L", ", L" ]" };

// Delimiters for pair
template<typename T1, typename T2> struct delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, char> { static const delimiters_values<char> values; };
template<typename T1, typename T2> const delimiters_values<char> delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, char>::values = { "(", ", ", ")" };
template<typename T1, typename T2> struct delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, wchar_t> { static const delimiters_values<wchar_t> values; };
template<typename T1, typename T2> const delimiters_values<wchar_t> delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, wchar_t>::values = { L"(", L", ", L")" };

// Functor to print containers. You can use this directly if you want to specificy a non-default delimiters type.
template<typename T, typename TChar = char, typename TCharTraits = std::char_traits<TChar>, typename TDelimiters = delimiters<T, TChar> >
struct print_container_helper
{
    typedef TChar char_type;
    typedef TDelimiters delimiters_type;
    typedef std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits>& ostream_type;

    print_container_helper(const T &container)
        : _container(&container)
    {
    }

    void operator()(ostream_type &stream) const
    {
        if( delimiters_type::values.prefix != NULL )
            stream << delimiters_type::values.prefix;
        std::copy(_container->begin(), _container->end(), pretty_ostream_iterator<typename T::value_type, TChar, TCharTraits>(stream, delimiters_type::values.delimiter));
        if( delimiters_type::values.postfix != NULL )
            stream << delimiters_type::values.postfix;
    }
private:
    const T *_container;
};

// Prints a print_container_helper to the specified stream.
template<typename T, typename TChar, typename TCharTraits, typename TDelimiters>
std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits>& operator<<(std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits> &stream, const print_container_helper<T, TChar, TDelimiters> &helper)
{
    helper(stream);
    return stream;
}

// Prints a container to the stream using default delimiters
template<typename T, typename TChar, typename TCharTraits>
typename std::enable_if<is_container<T>::value, std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits>&>::type
    operator<<(std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits> &stream, const T &container)
{
    stream << print_container_helper<T, TChar, TCharTraits>(container);
    return stream;
}

// Prints a pair to the stream using delimiters from delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>>.
template<typename T1, typename T2, typename TChar, typename TCharTraits>
std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits>& operator<<(std::basic_ostream<TChar, TCharTraits> &stream, const std::pair<T1, T2> &value)
{
    if( delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.prefix != NULL )
        stream << delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.prefix;

    stream << value.first;

    if( delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.delimiter != NULL )
        stream << delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.delimiter;

    stream << value.second;

    if( delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.postfix != NULL )
        stream << delimiters<std::pair<T1, T2>, TChar>::values.postfix;
    return stream;    
}

// Used by the sample below to generate some values
struct fibonacci
{
    fibonacci() : f1(0), f2(1) { }
    int operator()()
    {
        int r = f1 + f2;
        f1 = f2;
        f2 = r;
        return f1;
    }
private:
    int f1;
    int f2;
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    std::generate_n(std::back_inserter(v), 10, fibonacci());

    std::cout << v << std::endl;

    // Example of using pretty_ostream_iterator directly
    std::generate_n(pretty_ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ";"), 20, fibonacci());
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Like Marcelo's version, it uses an is_container type trait that must be specialized for all containers that are to be supported. It may be possible to use a trait to check for value_type, const_iterator, begin()/end(), but I'm not sure I'd recommend that since it might match things that match those criteria but aren't actually containers, like std::basic_string. Also like Marcelo's version, it uses templates that can be specialized to specify the delimiters to use.

The major difference is that I've built my version around a pretty_ostream_iterator, which works similar to the std::ostream_iterator but doesn't print a delimiter after the last item. Formatting the containers is done by the print_container_helper, which can be used directly to print containers without an is_container trait, or to specify a different delimiters type.

I've also defined is_container and delimiters so it will work for containers with non-standard predicates or allocators, and for both char and wchar_t. The operator<< function itself is also defined to work with both char and wchar_t streams.

Finally, I've used std::enable_if, which is available as part of C++0x, and works in Visual C++ 2010 and g++ 4.3 (needs the -std=c++0x flag) and later. This way there is no dependency on Boost.

  • If I'm reading this right, in order to have a pair print as <i, j> in one function and as [i j] in another, you have to define a whole new type, with a handful of static members in order to pass that type to print_container_helper? That seems overly complex. Why not go with an actual object, with fields you can set on a case by case basis, and the specializations simply providing different default values? – Dennis Zickefoose Jun 5 '11 at 19:00
  • See it this way: If there are a bunch of delimiters that you like personally, you can make a couple of classes with static members once and for all and then just use those. Of course you're right that using print_container_helper isn't as elegant as just the operator<<. You can always change the source, of course, or just add explicit specializations for your favourite container, e.g. for pair<int, int> and for pair<double, string>. Ultimately it's a matter of weighing power against convenience. Suggestions for improvement welcome! – Kerrek SB Jun 5 '11 at 20:54
  • ... and to follow up on that, if you already need situational printing of the same data type in different formattings, you'll probably have to write at least one small wrapper anyway. This isn't a highly-configurable formatting library, but rather a zero-effort sensible-default library that magically lets you print containers without thinking... (But if you want more global flexibility, we could probably add some #macros to make the defaults easy to manipulate.) – Kerrek SB Jun 5 '11 at 20:57
  • The real issue is that, although I could easily modify print_container_helper to use parameters for the custom delimiters, there's not really any way to specify delimiters for an inner container (or pair) other than specializing the delimiters template. Achieving that would be very complicated. – Sven Jun 6 '11 at 6:02
  • I'm almost managing to achieve a convenient custom delimiter solution using type erasure. If you already have a delimiter class MyDels, then I can say std::cout << CustomPrinter<MyDels>(x);. What I cannot do at the moment is say std::cout << CustomDelims<"{", ":", "}">(x);, because you cannot have const char * template arguments. The decision to make the delimiters compile-time constant puts some restrictions on the ease of use there, but I think it's well worth it. – Kerrek SB Jun 6 '11 at 14:59
31

You can print containers as well as ranges and tuples using the {fmt} library. For example:

#include <vector>
#include <fmt/ranges.h>

int main() {
  auto v = std::vector<int>{1, 2, 3};
  fmt::print("{}", v);
}

prints

{1, 2, 3}

to stdout (godbolt).

I wouldn't recommend overloading operator<< for standard containers because it may introduce ODR violations.

Disclaimer: I'm the author of {fmt}.

  • What about std::map? I could not find anything in the documentation – Karthik Nishanth Dec 21 '20 at 15:41
  • Formatting of all containers is supported. – vitaut Dec 21 '20 at 15:42
  • Can you please give me a starting point? I am having a hard time finding the usage of fmtlib with fmtlib print std::map as the search term. I apologize if this counts as a noob question or RTFM-like :) – Karthik Nishanth Dec 22 '20 at 9:00
  • Here's an example with map: godbolt.org/z/EG7aoE. As you can see there is no difference in usage. – vitaut Dec 22 '20 at 14:52
  • 1
    Oh my! This is amazing godbolt.org/z/h7qxba – Karthik Nishanth Dec 24 '20 at 15:50
21

This has been edited a few times, and we have decided to call the main class that wraps a collection RangePrinter

This should work automatically with any collection once you have written the one-time operator<< overload, except that you will need a special one for maps to print the pair, and may want to customise the delimiter there.

You could also have a special "print" function to use on the item instead of just outputting it direct. A bit like STL algorithms allow you to pass in custom predicates. With map you would use it this way, with a custom printer for the std::pair.

Your "default" printer would just output it to the stream.

Ok, let's work on a custom printer. I will change my outer class to RangePrinter. So we have 2 iterators and some delimiters but have not customised how to print the actual items.

struct DefaultPrinter
{
   template< typename T >
   std::ostream & operator()( std::ostream& os, const T& t ) const
   {
     return os << t;
   }

   // overload for std::pair
   template< typename K, typename V >
   std::ostream & operator()( std::ostream & os, std::pair<K,V> const& p)
   {
      return os << p.first << '=' << p.second;
   }
};

// some prototypes
template< typename FwdIter, typename Printer > class RangePrinter;

template< typename FwdIter, typename Printer > 
  std::ostream & operator<<( std::ostream &, 
        RangePrinter<FwdIter, Printer> const& );

template< typename FwdIter, typename Printer=DefaultPrinter >
class RangePrinter
{
    FwdIter begin;
    FwdIter end;
    std::string delim;
    std::string open;
    std::string close;
    Printer printer;

    friend std::ostream& operator<< <>( std::ostream&, 
         RangePrinter<FwdIter,Printer> const& );

public:
    RangePrinter( FwdIter b, FwdIter e, Printer p,
         std::string const& d, std::string const & o, std::string const& c )
      : begin( b ), end( e ), printer( p ), open( o ), close( c )
    {
    } 

     // with no "printer" variable
    RangePrinter( FwdIter b, FwdIter e,
         std::string const& d, std::string const & o, std::string const& c )
      : begin( b ), end( e ), open( o ), close( c )
    {
    } 

};


template<typename FwdIter, typename Printer>
std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& os, 
          RangePrinter<FwdIter, Printer> const& range )
{
    const Printer & printer = range.printer;

    os << range.open;
    FwdIter begin = range.begin, end = range.end;

    // print the first item
    if (begin == end) 
    { 
      return os << range.close; 
    }

    printer( os, *begin );

    // print the rest with delim as a prefix
    for( ++begin; begin != end; ++begin )
    {
       os << range.delim;
       printer( os, *begin );
    }
    return os << range.close;
}

Now by default it will work for maps as long as the key and value types are both printable and you can put in your own special item printer for when they are not (as you can with any other type), or if you do not want = as the delimiter.

I am moving the free-function to create these to the end now:

A free-function (iterator version) would look like something this and you could even have defaults:

template<typename Collection>
RangePrinter<typename Collection::const_iterator> rangePrinter
    ( const Collection& coll, const char * delim=",", 
       const char * open="[", const char * close="]")
{
   return RangePrinter< typename Collection::const_iterator >
     ( coll.begin(), coll.end(), delim, open, close );
}

You could then use it for std::set by

 std::cout << outputFormatter( mySet );

You can also write free-function version that take a custom printer and ones that take two iterators. In any case they will resolve the template parameters for you, and you will be able to pass them through as temporaries.

  • I see. This is similar to Marcelo Cantos's idea, isn't it? I shall try to turn this into a working example, thank you! – Kerrek SB Jan 31 '11 at 12:15
  • I find this solution much cleaner than Marcelo's, and it offers the same flexibility. I like the aspect that one has to explicitly wrap the output into a function call. To be really cool, you could add support for outputting a range of iterators directly, so that I can do std::cout << outputFormatter(beginOfRange, endOfRange);. – Björn Pollex Jan 31 '11 at 12:46
  • 1
    @CashCow: there is one issue with this solution, it does not seem to work with recursive collections (ie collections of collections). std::pair is the most basic example of "inner collection". – Matthieu M. Jan 31 '11 at 13:03
  • I'm liking this answer very much, since it has no dependencies and does not need to know about the containers it supports. Can we figure out if it can handle std::maps easily, and if it works for collections of collections? I'm tempted to accept this one as an answer, though. I hope Marcelo doesn't mind, his solution also works. – Kerrek SB Jan 31 '11 at 13:14
  • @Matthieu M. It depends how you print the inner collection. If you just use os << open << *iter << close then you will have a problem with it, but if you allow your user to pass in a custom printer as I have suggested you can then print anything you like. – CashCow Jan 31 '11 at 13:15
14

Here is a working library, presented as a complete working program, that I just hacked together:

#include <set>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

// Default delimiters
template <class C> struct Delims { static const char *delim[3]; };
template <class C> const char *Delims<C>::delim[3]={"[", ", ", "]"};
// Special delimiters for sets.                                                                                                             
template <typename T> struct Delims< std::set<T> > { static const char *delim[3]; };
template <typename T> const char *Delims< std::set<T> >::delim[3]={"{", ", ", "}"};

template <class C> struct IsContainer { enum { value = false }; };
template <typename T> struct IsContainer< std::vector<T> > { enum { value = true }; };
template <typename T> struct IsContainer< std::set<T>    > { enum { value = true }; };

template <class C>
typename boost::enable_if<IsContainer<C>, std::ostream&>::type
operator<<(std::ostream & o, const C & x)
{
  o << Delims<C>::delim[0];
  for (typename C::const_iterator i = x.begin(); i != x.end(); ++i)
    {
      if (i != x.begin()) o << Delims<C>::delim[1];
      o << *i;
    }
  o << Delims<C>::delim[2];
  return o;
}

template <typename T> struct IsChar { enum { value = false }; };
template <> struct IsChar<char> { enum { value = true }; };

template <typename T, int N>
typename boost::disable_if<IsChar<T>, std::ostream&>::type
operator<<(std::ostream & o, const T (&x)[N])
{
  o << "[";
  for (int i = 0; i != N; ++i)
    {
      if (i) o << ",";
      o << x[i];
    }
  o << "]";
  return o;
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> i;
  i.push_back(23);
  i.push_back(34);

  std::set<std::string> j;
  j.insert("hello");
  j.insert("world");

  double k[] = { 1.1, 2.2, M_PI, -1.0/123.0 };

  std::cout << i << "\n" << j << "\n" << k << "\n";
}

It currently only works with vector and set, but can be made to work with most containers, just by expanding on the IsContainer specializations. I haven't thought much about whether this code is minimal, but I can't immediately think of anything I could strip out as redundant.

EDIT: Just for kicks, I included a version that handles arrays. I had to exclude char arrays to avoid further ambiguities; it might still get into trouble with wchar_t[].

  • 2
    @Nawaz: As I said, this is just the beginning of a solution. You could support std::map<> either by specialising the operator, or by defining an operator<< for std::pair<>. – Marcelo Cantos Jan 31 '11 at 11:56
  • However, +1 for using Delims class template! – Nawaz Jan 31 '11 at 11:57
  • @MC: Oh good. This is looking very promising! (By the way, you need return type "std::ostream &", I had forgotten that initially.) – Kerrek SB Jan 31 '11 at 12:05
  • Hmm, I get "ambiguous overload" when trying this on an std::vector<int> and std::set<std::string>... – Kerrek SB Jan 31 '11 at 12:13
  • Yep, I'm currently figuring out how to prevent the ambiguities, which are caused by the fact that the operator<< template matches just about anything. – Marcelo Cantos Jan 31 '11 at 12:17
11

The code proved to be handy on several occasions now and I feel the expense to get into customization as usage is quite low. Thus, I decided to release it under MIT license and provide a GitHub repository where the header and a small example file can be downloaded.

http://djmuw.github.io/prettycc

0. Preface and wording

A 'decoration' in terms of this answer is a set of prefix-string, delimiter-string, and a postfix-string. Where the prefix string is inserted into a stream before and the postfix string after the values of a container (see 2. Target containers). The delimiter string is inserted between the values of the respective container.

Note: Actually, this answer does not address the question to 100% since the decoration is not strictly compiled time constant because runtime checks are required to check whether a custom decoration has been applied to the current stream. Nevertheless, I think it has some decent features.

Note2: May have minor bugs since it is not yet well tested.

1. General idea/usage

Zero additional code required for usage

It is to be kept as easy as

#include <vector>
#include "pretty.h"

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::vector<int>{1,2,3,4,5}; // prints 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  return 0;
}

Easy customization ...

... with respect to a specific stream object

#include <vector>
#include "pretty.h"

int main()
{
  // set decoration for std::vector<int> for cout object
  std::cout << pretty::decoration<std::vector<int>>("(", ",", ")");
  std::cout << std::vector<int>{1,2,3,4,5}; // prints (1,2,3,4,5)
  return 0;
}

or with respect to all streams:

#include <vector>
#include "pretty.h"

// set decoration for std::vector<int> for all ostream objects
PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(std::vector<int>, "{", ", ", "}")

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::vector<int>{1,2,3,4,5}; // prints {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
  std::cout << pretty::decoration<std::vector<int>>("(", ",", ")");
  std::cout << std::vector<int>{1,2,3,4,5}; // prints (1,2,3,4,5)
  return 0;
}

Rough description

  • The code includes a class template providing a default decoration for any type
  • which can be specialized to change the default decoration for (a) certain type(s) and it is
  • using the private storage provided by ios_base using xalloc/pword in order to save a pointer to a pretty::decor object specifically decorating a certain type on a certain stream.

If no pretty::decor<T> object for this stream has been set up explicitly pretty::defaulted<T, charT, chartraitT>::decoration() is called to obtain the default decoration for the given type. The class pretty::defaulted is to be specialized to customize default decorations.

2. Target objects / containers

Target objects obj for the 'pretty decoration' of this code are objects having either

  • overloads std::begin and std::end defined (includes C-Style arrays),
  • having begin(obj) and end(obj) available via ADL,
  • are of type std::tuple
  • or of type std::pair.

The code includes a trait for identification of classes with range features (begin/end). (There's no check included, whether begin(obj) == end(obj) is a valid expression, though.)

The code provides operator<<s in the global namespace that only apply to classes not having a more specialized version of operator<< available. Therefore, for example std::string is not printed using the operator in this code although having a valid begin/end pair.

3. Utilization and customization

Decorations can be imposed separately for every type (except different tuples) and stream (not stream type!). (I.e. a std::vector<int> can have different decorations for different stream objects.)

A) Default decoration

The default prefix is "" (nothing) as is the default postfix, while the default delimiter is ", " (comma+space).

B) Customized default decoration of a type by specializing the pretty::defaulted class template

The struct defaulted has a static member function decoration() returning a decor object which includes the default values for the given type.

Example using an array:

Customize default array printing:

namespace pretty
{
  template<class T, std::size_t N>
  struct defaulted<T[N]>
  {
    static decor<T[N]> decoration()
    {
      return{ { "(" }, { ":" }, { ")" } };
    }
  };
}

Print an arry array:

float e[5] = { 3.4f, 4.3f, 5.2f, 1.1f, 22.2f };
std::cout << e << '\n'; // prints (3.4:4.3:5.2:1.1:22.2)

Using the PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(TYPE, PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX, ...) macro for char streams

The macro expands to

namespace pretty { 
  template< __VA_ARGS__ >
  struct defaulted< TYPE > {
    static decor< TYPE > decoration() {
      return { PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX };
    } 
  }; 
} 

enabling the above partial specialization to be rewritten to

PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(T[N], "", ";", "", class T, std::size_t N)

or inserting a full specialization like

PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(std::vector<int>, "(", ", ", ")")

Another macro for wchar_t streams is included: PRETTY_DEFAULT_WDECORATION.

C) Impose decoration on streams

The function pretty::decoration is used to impose a decoration on a certain stream. There are overloads taking either - one string argument being the delimiter (adopting prefix and postfix from the defaulted class) - or three string arguments assembling the complete decoration

Complete decoration for given type and stream

float e[3] = { 3.4f, 4.3f, 5.2f };
std::stringstream u;
// add { ; } decoration to u
u << pretty::decoration<float[3]>("{", "; ", "}");

// use { ; } decoration
u << e << '\n'; // prints {3.4; 4.3; 5.2}

// uses decoration returned by defaulted<float[3]>::decoration()
std::cout << e; // prints 3.4, 4.3, 5.2

Customization of delimiter for given stream

PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(float[3], "{{{", ",", "}}}")

std::stringstream v;
v << e; // prints {{{3.4,4.3,5.2}}}

v << pretty::decoration<float[3]>(":");
v << e; // prints {{{3.4:4.3:5.2}}}

v << pretty::decoration<float[3]>("((", "=", "))");
v << e; // prints ((3.4=4.3=5.2))

4. Special handling of std::tuple

Instead of allowing a specialization for every possible tuple type, this code applies any decoration available for std::tuple<void*> to all kind of std::tuple<...>s.

5. Remove custom decoration from the stream

To go back to the defaulted decoration for a given type use pretty::clear function template on the stream s.

s << pretty::clear<std::vector<int>>();

5. Further examples

Printing "matrix-like" with newline delimiter

std::vector<std::vector<int>> m{ {1,2,3}, {4,5,6}, {7,8,9} };
std::cout << pretty::decoration<std::vector<std::vector<int>>>("\n");
std::cout << m;

Prints

1, 2, 3
4, 5, 6
7, 8, 9

See it on ideone/KKUebZ

6. Code

#ifndef pretty_print_0x57547_sa4884X_0_1_h_guard_
#define pretty_print_0x57547_sa4884X_0_1_h_guard_

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iterator>
#include <utility>

#define PRETTY_DEFAULT_DECORATION(TYPE, PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX, ...) \
    namespace pretty { template< __VA_ARGS__ >\
    struct defaulted< TYPE > {\
    static decor< TYPE > decoration(){\
      return { PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX };\
    } /*decoration*/ }; /*defaulted*/} /*pretty*/

#define PRETTY_DEFAULT_WDECORATION(TYPE, PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX, ...) \
    namespace pretty { template< __VA_ARGS__ >\
    struct defaulted< TYPE, wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t> > {\
    static decor< TYPE, wchar_t, std::char_traits<wchar_t> > decoration(){\
      return { PREFIX, DELIM, POSTFIX };\
    } /*decoration*/ }; /*defaulted*/} /*pretty*/

namespace pretty
{

  namespace detail
  {
    // drag in begin and end overloads
    using std::begin;
    using std::end;
    // helper template
    template <int I> using _ol = std::integral_constant<int, I>*;
    // SFINAE check whether T is a range with begin/end
    template<class T>
    class is_range
    {
      // helper function declarations using expression sfinae
      template <class U, _ol<0> = nullptr>
      static std::false_type b(...);
      template <class U, _ol<1> = nullptr>
      static auto b(U &v) -> decltype(begin(v), std::true_type());
      template <class U, _ol<0> = nullptr>
      static std::false_type e(...);
      template <class U, _ol<1> = nullptr>
      static auto e(U &v) -> decltype(end(v), std::true_type());
      // return types
      using b_return = decltype(b<T>(std::declval<T&>()));
      using e_return = decltype(e<T>(std::declval<T&>()));
    public:
      static const bool value = b_return::value && e_return::value;
    };
  }

  // holder class for data
  template<class T, class CharT = char, class TraitT = std::char_traits<CharT>>
  struct decor
  {
    static const int xindex;
    std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> prefix, delimiter, postfix;
    decor(std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & pre = "",
      std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & delim = "",
      std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & post = "")
      : prefix(pre), delimiter(delim), postfix(post) {}
  };

  template<class T, class charT, class traits>
  int const decor<T, charT, traits>::xindex = std::ios_base::xalloc();

  namespace detail
  {

    template<class T, class CharT, class TraitT>
    void manage_decor(std::ios_base::event evt, std::ios_base &s, int const idx)
    {
      using deco_type = decor<T, CharT, TraitT>;
      if (evt == std::ios_base::erase_event)
      { // erase deco
        void const * const p = s.pword(idx);
        if (p)
        {
          delete static_cast<deco_type const * const>(p);
          s.pword(idx) = nullptr;
        }
      }
      else if (evt == std::ios_base::copyfmt_event)
      { // copy deco
        void const * const p = s.pword(idx);
        if (p)
        {
          auto np = new deco_type{ *static_cast<deco_type const * const>(p) };
          s.pword(idx) = static_cast<void*>(np);
        }
      }
    }

    template<class T> struct clearer {};

    template<class T, class CharT, class TraitT>
    std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT>& operator<< (
      std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, clearer<T> const &)
    {
      using deco_type = decor<T, CharT, TraitT>;
      void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
      if (p)
      { // delete if set
        delete static_cast<deco_type const *>(p);
        s.pword(deco_type::xindex) = nullptr;
      }
      return s;
    }

    template <class CharT> 
    struct default_data { static const CharT * decor[3]; };
    template <> 
    const char * default_data<char>::decor[3] = { "", ", ", "" };
    template <> 
    const wchar_t * default_data<wchar_t>::decor[3] = { L"", L", ", L"" };

  }

  // Clear decoration for T
  template<class T>
  detail::clearer<T> clear() { return{}; }
  template<class T, class CharT, class TraitT>
  void clear(std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s) { s << detail::clearer<T>{}; }

  // impose decoration on ostream
  template<class T, class CharT, class TraitT>
  std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT>& operator<<(
    std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, decor<T, CharT, TraitT> && h)
  {
    using deco_type = decor<T, CharT, TraitT>;
    void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
    // delete if already set
    if (p) delete static_cast<deco_type const *>(p);
    s.pword(deco_type::xindex) = static_cast<void *>(new deco_type{ std::move(h) });
    // check whether we alread have a callback registered
    if (s.iword(deco_type::xindex) == 0)
    { // if this is not the case register callback and set iword
      s.register_callback(detail::manage_decor<T, CharT, TraitT>, deco_type::xindex);
      s.iword(deco_type::xindex) = 1;
    }
    return s;
  }

  template<class T, class CharT = char, class TraitT = std::char_traits<CharT>>
  struct defaulted
  {
    static inline decor<T, CharT, TraitT> decoration()
    {
      return{ detail::default_data<CharT>::decor[0],
        detail::default_data<CharT>::decor[1],
        detail::default_data<CharT>::decor[2] };
    }
  };

  template<class T, class CharT = char, class TraitT = std::char_traits<CharT>>
  decor<T, CharT, TraitT> decoration(
    std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & prefix,
    std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & delimiter,
    std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & postfix)
  {
    return{ prefix, delimiter, postfix };
  }

  template<class T, class CharT = char,
  class TraitT = std::char_traits < CharT >>
    decor<T, CharT, TraitT> decoration(
      std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const & delimiter)
  {
    using str_type = std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT>;
    return{ defaulted<T, CharT, TraitT>::decoration().prefix,
      delimiter, defaulted<T, CharT, TraitT>::decoration().postfix };
  }

  template<class T, class CharT = char,
  class TraitT = std::char_traits < CharT >>
    decor<T, CharT, TraitT> decoration(CharT const * const prefix,
      CharT const * const delimiter, CharT const * const postfix)
  {
    using str_type = std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT>;
    return{ str_type{ prefix }, str_type{ delimiter }, str_type{ postfix } };
  }

  template<class T, class CharT = char,
  class TraitT = std::char_traits < CharT >>
    decor<T, CharT, TraitT> decoration(CharT const * const delimiter)
  {
    using str_type = std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT>;
    return{ defaulted<T, CharT, TraitT>::decoration().prefix,
      str_type{ delimiter }, defaulted<T, CharT, TraitT>::decoration().postfix };
  }

  template<typename T, std::size_t N, std::size_t L>
  struct tuple
  {
    template<class CharT, class TraitT>
    static void print(std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT>& s, T const & value,
      std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const &delimiter)
    {
      s << std::get<N>(value) << delimiter;
      tuple<T, N + 1, L>::print(s, value, delimiter);
    }
  };

  template<typename T, std::size_t N>
  struct tuple<T, N, N>
  {
    template<class CharT, class TraitT>
    static void print(std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT>& s, T const & value,
      std::basic_string<CharT, TraitT> const &) {
      s << std::get<N>(value);
    }
  };

}

template<class CharT, class TraitT>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> & operator<< (
  std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, std::tuple<> const & v)
{
  using deco_type = pretty::decor<std::tuple<void*>, CharT, TraitT>;
  using defaulted_type = pretty::defaulted<std::tuple<void*>, CharT, TraitT>;
  void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
  auto const d = static_cast<deco_type const * const>(p);
  s << (d ? d->prefix : defaulted_type::decoration().prefix);
  s << (d ? d->postfix : defaulted_type::decoration().postfix);
  return s;
}

template<class CharT, class TraitT, class ... T>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> & operator<< (
  std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, std::tuple<T...> const & v)
{
  using deco_type = pretty::decor<std::tuple<void*>, CharT, TraitT>;
  using defaulted_type = pretty::defaulted<std::tuple<void*>, CharT, TraitT>;
  using pretty_tuple = pretty::tuple<std::tuple<T...>, 0U, sizeof...(T)-1U>;
  void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
  auto const d = static_cast<deco_type const * const>(p);
  s << (d ? d->prefix : defaulted_type::decoration().prefix);
  pretty_tuple::print(s, v, d ? d->delimiter : 
    defaulted_type::decoration().delimiter);
  s << (d ? d->postfix : defaulted_type::decoration().postfix);
  return s;
}

template<class T, class U, class CharT, class TraitT>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> & operator<< (
  std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, std::pair<T, U> const & v)
{
  using deco_type = pretty::decor<std::pair<T, U>, CharT, TraitT>;
  using defaulted_type = pretty::defaulted<std::pair<T, U>, CharT, TraitT>;
  void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
  auto const d = static_cast<deco_type const * const>(p);
  s << (d ? d->prefix : defaulted_type::decoration().prefix);
  s << v.first;
  s << (d ? d->delimiter : defaulted_type::decoration().delimiter);
  s << v.second;
  s << (d ? d->postfix : defaulted_type::decoration().postfix);
  return s;
}


template<class T, class CharT = char,
class TraitT = std::char_traits < CharT >>
  typename std::enable_if < pretty::detail::is_range<T>::value,
  std::basic_ostream < CharT, TraitT >> ::type & operator<< (
    std::basic_ostream<CharT, TraitT> &s, T const & v)
{
  bool first(true);
  using deco_type = pretty::decor<T, CharT, TraitT>;
  using default_type = pretty::defaulted<T, CharT, TraitT>;
  void const * const p = s.pword(deco_type::xindex);
  auto d = static_cast<pretty::decor<T, CharT, TraitT> const * const>(p);
  s << (d ? d->prefix : default_type::decoration().prefix);
  for (auto const & e : v)
  { // v is range thus range based for works
    if (!first) s << (d ? d->delimiter : default_type::decoration().delimiter);
    s << e;
    first = false;
  }
  s << (d ? d->postfix : default_type::decoration().postfix);
  return s;
}

#endif // pretty_print_0x57547_sa4884X_0_1_h_guard_
4

I am going to add another answer here, because I have come up with a different approach to my previous one, and that is to use locale facets.

The basics are here

Essentially what you do is:

  1. Create a class that derives from std::locale::facet. The slight downside is that you will need a compilation unit somewhere to hold its id. Let's call it MyPrettyVectorPrinter. You'd probably give it a better name, and also create ones for pair and map.
  2. In your stream function, you check std::has_facet< MyPrettyVectorPrinter >
  3. If that returns true, extract it with std::use_facet< MyPrettyVectorPrinter >( os.getloc() )
  4. Your facet objects will have values for the delimiters and you can read them. If the facet isn't found, your print function (operator<<) provides default ones. Note you can do the same thing for reading a vector.

I like this method because you can use a default print whilst still being able to use a custom override.

The downsides are needing a library for your facet if used in multiple projects (so can't just be headers-only) and also the fact that you need to beware about the expense of creating a new locale object.

I have written this as a new solution rather than modify my other one because I believe both approaches can be correct and you take your pick.

  • Let me get this straight: With this approach, do I need to actively whitelist each container type that I want to use? – Kerrek SB Feb 14 '13 at 16:23
  • Well really one should not extend std other than for ones own types, but you write an overload of operator<< for each container type (vector, map, list, deque) plus pair that you want to be able to print. Of course some may share a facet (e.g. you might wish to print list, vector and deque all the same). You provide a "default" print method but allow users to create a facet and locale and imbue before printing. A bit like the way boost prints their date_time. One can also load their facet onto the global locale to print that way by default. – CashCow Feb 19 '13 at 11:14
2

The goal here is to use ADL to do customization of how we pretty print.

You pass in a formatter tag, and override 4 functions (before, after, between and descend) in the tag's namespace. This changes how the formatter prints 'adornments' when iterating over containers.

A default formatter that does {(a->b),(c->d)} for maps, (a,b,c) for tupleoids, "hello" for strings, [x,y,z] for everything else included.

It should "just work" with 3rd party iterable types (and treat them like "everything else").

If you want custom adornments for your 3rd party iterables, simply create your own tag. It will take a bit of work to handle map descent (you need to overload pretty_print_descend( your_tag to return pretty_print::decorator::map_magic_tag<your_tag>). Maybe there is a cleaner way to do this, not sure.

A little library to detect iterability, and tuple-ness:

namespace details {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  template<class T, class=void>
  struct is_iterable_test:std::false_type{};
  template<class T>
  struct is_iterable_test<T,
    decltype((void)(
      (void)(begin(std::declval<T>())==end(std::declval<T>()))
      , ((void)(std::next(begin(std::declval<T>()))))
      , ((void)(*begin(std::declval<T>())))
      , 1
    ))
  >:std::true_type{};
  template<class T>struct is_tupleoid:std::false_type{};
  template<class...Ts>struct is_tupleoid<std::tuple<Ts...>>:std::true_type{};
  template<class...Ts>struct is_tupleoid<std::pair<Ts...>>:std::true_type{};
  // template<class T, size_t N>struct is_tupleoid<std::array<T,N>>:std::true_type{}; // complete, but problematic
}
template<class T>struct is_iterable:details::is_iterable_test<std::decay_t<T>>{};
template<class T, std::size_t N>struct is_iterable<T(&)[N]>:std::true_type{}; // bypass decay
template<class T>struct is_tupleoid:details::is_tupleoid<std::decay_t<T>>{};

template<class T>struct is_visitable:std::integral_constant<bool, is_iterable<T>{}||is_tupleoid<T>{}> {};

A library that lets us visit the contents of an iterable or tuple type object:

template<class C, class F>
std::enable_if_t<is_iterable<C>{}> visit_first(C&& c, F&& f) {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  auto&& b = begin(c);
  auto&& e = end(c);
  if (b==e)
      return;
  std::forward<F>(f)(*b);
}
template<class C, class F>
std::enable_if_t<is_iterable<C>{}> visit_all_but_first(C&& c, F&& f) {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  auto it = begin(c);
  auto&& e = end(c);
  if (it==e)
      return;
  it = std::next(it);
  for( ; it!=e; it = std::next(it) ) {
    f(*it);
  }
}

namespace details {
  template<class Tup, class F>
  void visit_first( std::index_sequence<>, Tup&&, F&& ) {}
  template<size_t... Is, class Tup, class F>
  void visit_first( std::index_sequence<0,Is...>, Tup&& tup, F&& f ) {
    std::forward<F>(f)( std::get<0>( std::forward<Tup>(tup) ) );
  }
  template<class Tup, class F>
  void visit_all_but_first( std::index_sequence<>, Tup&&, F&& ) {}
  template<size_t... Is,class Tup, class F>
  void visit_all_but_first( std::index_sequence<0,Is...>, Tup&& tup, F&& f ) {
    int unused[] = {0,((void)(
      f( std::get<Is>(std::forward<Tup>(tup)) )
    ),0)...};
    (void)(unused);
  }
}
template<class Tup, class F>
std::enable_if_t<is_tupleoid<Tup>{}> visit_first(Tup&& tup, F&& f) {
  details::visit_first( std::make_index_sequence< std::tuple_size<std::decay_t<Tup>>{} >{}, std::forward<Tup>(tup), std::forward<F>(f) );
}
template<class Tup, class F>
std::enable_if_t<is_tupleoid<Tup>{}> visit_all_but_first(Tup&& tup, F&& f) {
  details::visit_all_but_first( std::make_index_sequence< std::tuple_size<std::decay_t<Tup>>{} >{}, std::forward<Tup>(tup), std::forward<F>(f) );
}

A pretty printing library:

namespace pretty_print {
  namespace decorator {
    struct default_tag {};
    template<class Old>
    struct map_magic_tag:Old {}; // magic for maps

    // Maps get {}s. Write trait `is_associative` to generalize:
    template<class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_before( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, std::map<Xs...> const& ) {
      s << CharT('{');
    }

    template<class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_after( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, std::map<Xs...> const& ) {
      s << CharT('}');
    }

    // tuples and pairs get ():
    template<class CharT, class Traits, class Tup >
    std::enable_if_t<is_tupleoid<Tup>{}> pretty_print_before( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, Tup const& ) {
      s << CharT('(');
    }

    template<class CharT, class Traits, class Tup >
    std::enable_if_t<is_tupleoid<Tup>{}> pretty_print_after( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, Tup const& ) {
      s << CharT(')');
    }

    // strings with the same character type get ""s:
    template<class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_before( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, std::basic_string<CharT, Xs...> const& ) {
      s << CharT('"');
    }
    template<class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_after( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, std::basic_string<CharT, Xs...> const& ) {
      s << CharT('"');
    }
    // and pack the characters together:
    template<class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_between( default_tag, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>&, std::basic_string<CharT, Xs...> const& ) {}

    // map magic. When iterating over the contents of a map, use the map_magic_tag:
    template<class...Xs>
    map_magic_tag<default_tag> pretty_print_descend( default_tag, std::map<Xs...> const& ) {
      return {};
    }
    template<class old_tag, class C>
    old_tag pretty_print_descend( map_magic_tag<old_tag>, C const& ) {
      return {};
    }

    // When printing a pair immediately within a map, use -> as a separator:
    template<class old_tag, class CharT, class Traits, class...Xs >
    void pretty_print_between( map_magic_tag<old_tag>, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, std::pair<Xs...> const& ) {
      s << CharT('-') << CharT('>');
    }
  }

  // default behavior:
  template<class CharT, class Traits, class Tag, class Container >
  void pretty_print_before( Tag const&, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, Container const& ) {
    s << CharT('[');
  }
  template<class CharT, class Traits, class Tag, class Container >
  void pretty_print_after( Tag const&, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, Container const& ) {
    s << CharT(']');
  }
  template<class CharT, class Traits, class Tag, class Container >
  void pretty_print_between( Tag const&, std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& s, Container const& ) {
    s << CharT(',');
  }
  template<class Tag, class Container>
  Tag&& pretty_print_descend( Tag&& tag, Container const& ) {
    return std::forward<Tag>(tag);
  }

  // print things by default by using <<:
  template<class Tag=decorator::default_tag, class Scalar, class CharT, class Traits>
  std::enable_if_t<!is_visitable<Scalar>{}> print( std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& os, Scalar&& scalar, Tag&&=Tag{} ) {
    os << std::forward<Scalar>(scalar);
  }
  // for anything visitable (see above), use the pretty print algorithm:
  template<class Tag=decorator::default_tag, class C, class CharT, class Traits>
  std::enable_if_t<is_visitable<C>{}> print( std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& os, C&& c, Tag&& tag=Tag{} ) {
    pretty_print_before( std::forward<Tag>(tag), os, std::forward<C>(c) );
    visit_first( c, [&](auto&& elem) {
      print( os, std::forward<decltype(elem)>(elem), pretty_print_descend( std::forward<Tag>(tag), std::forward<C>(c) ) );
    });
    visit_all_but_first( c, [&](auto&& elem) {
      pretty_print_between( std::forward<Tag>(tag), os, std::forward<C>(c) );
      print( os, std::forward<decltype(elem)>(elem), pretty_print_descend( std::forward<Tag>(tag), std::forward<C>(c) ) );
    });
    pretty_print_after( std::forward<Tag>(tag), os, std::forward<C>(c) );
  }
}

Test code:

int main() {
  std::vector<int> x = {1,2,3};

  pretty_print::print( std::cout, x );
  std::cout << "\n";

  std::map< std::string, int > m;
  m["hello"] = 3;
  m["world"] = 42;

  pretty_print::print( std::cout, m );
  std::cout << "\n";
}

live example

This does use C++14 features (some _t aliases, and auto&& lambdas), but none are essential.

  • @KerrekSB working version, with some changes. The bulk of the code is general "visit tuples/iterables", and fancy formatting (including -> within the pairs of maps) at this point. The core of the pretty print library is nice and small, which is nice. I tried to make it easily extendible, not sure if I succeeded. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Nov 25 '14 at 15:39
1

My solution is simple.h, which is part of scc package. All std containers, maps, sets, c-arrays are printable.

  • Interesting. I like the template-of-template approach for containers, but does it work for custom containers and STL containers with non-standard predicates or allocators? (I did something similar for an attempt to implement a bimap in C++0x using variadic templates.) Also, you don't seem to use iterators generically for your printing routines; why the explicit use of a counter i? – Kerrek SB Jun 19 '11 at 11:02
  • What is container with non-standard predicates? Custom container which match signature will be printed. Non standard allocaters are not supported right now, but it is easy to fix. I just don't need this for now. – Leonid Volnitsky Jun 26 '11 at 12:36
  • There is not good reason to use index instead of iterators. Historical reasons. Will fix it when I will have time. – Leonid Volnitsky Jun 26 '11 at 14:23
  • By "container with non-standard predicates" I mean something like a std::set with a custom comparator, or an unordered_map with a custom equality. It'd be very important to support those constructions. – Kerrek SB Jun 26 '11 at 19:08
1

Coming out of one of the first BoostCon (now called CppCon), I and two others worked on a library to do just this. The main sticking point was needing to extend namespace std. That turned out to be a no-go for a boost library.

Unfortunately the links to the code no longer work, but you might find some interesting tidbits in the discussions (at least those that aren't talking about what to name it!)

http://boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/explore-Library-Proposal-Container-Streaming-td2619544.html

1

Here is my version of implementation done in 2016

Everything in one header, so it's easy to use https://github.com/skident/eos/blob/master/include/eos/io/print.hpp

/*! \file       print.hpp
 *  \brief      Useful functions for work with STL containers. 
 *          
 *  Now it supports generic print for STL containers like: [elem1, elem2, elem3]
 *  Supported STL conrainers: vector, deque, list, set multiset, unordered_set,
 *  map, multimap, unordered_map, array
 *
 *  \author     Skident
 *  \date       02.09.2016
 *  \copyright  Skident Inc.
 */

#pragma once

// check is the C++11 or greater available (special hack for MSVC)
#if (defined(_MSC_VER) && __cplusplus >= 199711L) || __cplusplus >= 201103L
    #define MODERN_CPP_AVAILABLE 1
#endif


#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
#include <deque>
#include <set>
#include <list>
#include <map>
#include <cctype>

#ifdef MODERN_CPP_AVAILABLE
    #include <array>
    #include <unordered_set>
    #include <unordered_map>
    #include <forward_list>
#endif


#define dump(value) std::cout << (#value) << ": " << (value) << std::endl

#define BUILD_CONTENT                                                       \
        std::stringstream ss;                                               \
        for (; it != collection.end(); ++it)                                \
        {                                                                   \
            ss << *it << elem_separator;                                    \
        }                                                                   \


#define BUILD_MAP_CONTENT                                                   \
        std::stringstream ss;                                               \
        for (; it != collection.end(); ++it)                                \
        {                                                                   \
            ss  << it->first                                                \
                << keyval_separator                                         \
                << it->second                                               \
                << elem_separator;                                          \
        }                                                                   \


#define COMPILE_CONTENT                                                     \
        std::string data = ss.str();                                        \
        if (!data.empty() && !elem_separator.empty())                       \
            data = data.substr(0, data.rfind(elem_separator));              \
        std::string result = first_bracket + data + last_bracket;           \
        os << result;                                                       \
        if (needEndl)                                                       \
            os << std::endl;                                                \



////
///
///
/// Template definitions
///
///

//generic template for classes: deque, list, forward_list, vector
#define VECTOR_AND_CO_TEMPLATE                                          \
    template<                                                           \
        template<class T,                                               \
                 class Alloc = std::allocator<T> >                      \
        class Container, class Type, class Alloc>                       \

#define SET_TEMPLATE                                                    \
    template<                                                           \
        template<class T,                                               \
                 class Compare = std::less<T>,                          \
                 class Alloc = std::allocator<T> >                      \
            class Container, class T, class Compare, class Alloc>       \

#define USET_TEMPLATE                                                   \
    template<                                                           \
template < class Key,                                                   \
           class Hash = std::hash<Key>,                                 \
           class Pred = std::equal_to<Key>,                             \
           class Alloc = std::allocator<Key>                            \
           >                                                            \
    class Container, class Key, class Hash, class Pred, class Alloc     \
    >                                                                   \


#define MAP_TEMPLATE                                                    \
    template<                                                           \
        template<class Key,                                             \
                class T,                                                \
                class Compare = std::less<Key>,                         \
                class Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const Key,T> >   \
                >                                                       \
        class Container, class Key,                                     \
        class Value/*, class Compare, class Alloc*/>                    \


#define UMAP_TEMPLATE                                                   \
    template<                                                           \
        template<class Key,                                             \
                   class T,                                             \
                   class Hash = std::hash<Key>,                         \
                   class Pred = std::equal_to<Key>,                     \
                   class Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const Key,T> >\
                 >                                                      \
        class Container, class Key, class Value,                        \
        class Hash, class Pred, class Alloc                             \
                >                                                       \


#define ARRAY_TEMPLATE                                                  \
    template<                                                           \
        template<class T, std::size_t N>                                \
        class Array, class Type, std::size_t Size>                      \



namespace eos
{
    static const std::string default_elem_separator     = ", ";
    static const std::string default_keyval_separator   = " => ";
    static const std::string default_first_bracket      = "[";
    static const std::string default_last_bracket       = "]";


    //! Prints template Container<T> as in Python
    //! Supported containers: vector, deque, list, set, unordered_set(C++11), forward_list(C++11)
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    template<class Container>
    void print( const Container& collection
              , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
              , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
              , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
              , std::ostream& os = std::cout
              , bool needEndl = true
            )
    {
        typename Container::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }


    //! Prints collections with one template argument and allocator as in Python.
    //! Supported standard collections: vector, deque, list, forward_list
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    VECTOR_AND_CO_TEMPLATE
    void print( const Container<Type>& collection
              , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
              , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
              , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
              , std::ostream& os = std::cout
              , bool needEndl = true
            )
    {
        typename Container<Type>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }


    //! Prints collections like std:set<T, Compare, Alloc> as in Python
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    SET_TEMPLATE
    void print( const Container<T, Compare, Alloc>& collection
              , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
              , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
              , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
              , std::ostream& os = std::cout
              , bool needEndl = true
            )
    {
        typename Container<T, Compare, Alloc>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }


    //! Prints collections like std:unordered_set<Key, Hash, Pred, Alloc> as in Python
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    USET_TEMPLATE
    void print( const Container<Key, Hash, Pred, Alloc>& collection
              , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
              , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
              , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
              , std::ostream& os = std::cout
              , bool needEndl = true
            )
    {
        typename Container<Key, Hash, Pred, Alloc>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }

    //! Prints collections like std:map<T, U> as in Python
    //! supports generic objects of std: map, multimap
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    MAP_TEMPLATE
    void print(   const Container<Key, Value>& collection
                , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
                , const std::string& keyval_separator = default_keyval_separator
                , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
                , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
                , std::ostream& os = std::cout
                , bool needEndl = true
        )
    {
        typename Container<Key, Value>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_MAP_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }

    //! Prints classes like std:unordered_map as in Python
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    UMAP_TEMPLATE
    void print(   const Container<Key, Value, Hash, Pred, Alloc>& collection
                , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
                , const std::string& keyval_separator = default_keyval_separator
                , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
                , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
                , std::ostream& os = std::cout
                , bool needEndl = true
        )
    {
        typename Container<Key, Value, Hash, Pred, Alloc>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_MAP_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }

    //! Prints collections like std:array<T, Size> as in Python
    //! \param collection which should be printed
    //! \param elem_separator the separator which will be inserted between elements of collection
    //! \param keyval_separator separator between key and value of map. For default it is the '=>'
    //! \param first_bracket data before collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker '(', '[', '{')
    //! \param last_bracket data after collection's elements (usual it is the parenthesis, square or curly bracker ')', ']', '}')
    ARRAY_TEMPLATE
    void print(   const Array<Type, Size>& collection
                , const std::string& elem_separator   = default_elem_separator
                , const std::string& first_bracket    = default_first_bracket
                , const std::string& last_bracket     = default_last_bracket
                , std::ostream& os = std::cout
                , bool needEndl = true
            )
    {
        typename Array<Type, Size>::const_iterator it = collection.begin();
        BUILD_CONTENT
        COMPILE_CONTENT
    }

    //! Removes all whitespaces before data in string.
    //! \param str string with data
    //! \return string without whitespaces in left part
    std::string ltrim(const std::string& str);

    //! Removes all whitespaces after data in string
    //! \param str string with data
    //! \return string without whitespaces in right part
    std::string rtrim(const std::string& str);

    //! Removes all whitespaces before and after data in string
    //! \param str string with data
    //! \return string without whitespaces before and after data in string
    std::string trim(const std::string& str);



    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    ////////////////////////ostream logic//////////////////////
    /// Should be specified for concrete containers
    /// because of another types can be suitable
    /// for templates, for example templates break
    /// the code like this "cout << string("hello") << endl;"
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////



#define PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)                            \
    print(  collection,                                                     \
            default_elem_separator,                                         \
            default_first_bracket,                                          \
            default_last_bracket,                                           \
            os,                                                             \
            false                                                           \
    );                                                                      \

#define PROCESS_KEY_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)                        \
    print(  collection,                                                     \
            default_elem_separator,                                         \
            default_keyval_separator,                                       \
            default_first_bracket,                                          \
            default_last_bracket,                                           \
            os,                                                             \
            false                                                           \
    );                                                                      \

    ///< specialization for vector
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::vector<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for deque
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::deque<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for list
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::list<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for set
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::set<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for multiset
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::multiset<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

#ifdef MODERN_CPP_AVAILABLE
    ///< specialization for unordered_map
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::unordered_set<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for forward_list
    template<class T>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::forward_list<T>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for array
    template<class T, std::size_t N>
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::array<T, N>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }
#endif

    ///< specialization for map, multimap
    MAP_TEMPLATE
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Container<Key, Value>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_KEY_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }

    ///< specialization for unordered_map
    UMAP_TEMPLATE
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Container<Key, Value, Hash, Pred, Alloc>& collection)
    {
        PROCESS_KEY_VALUE_COLLECTION(os, collection)
        return os;
    }
}

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