3

I'm trying to load an external JavaScript, do some work with it, delete it and load it back again. But I'm having problems and maybe someone can help me understand why.

Here is an example of an external script to be loaded:

class ClassA {
    constructor() {
        console.log("ClassA object created");
    }
}

Here is an example of what I'm trying to do with it:

let aScript = document.createElement("script");

aScript.onload = function() {

    //test ClassA object
    let classA = new ClassA(); //OK (ClassA object created)
    classA = null //OK

    //remove/delete the script
    document.head.removeChild(aScript); //OK
    delete ClassA; //OK
    ClassA = null; //OK
    window.ClassA = null //OK

    //Try to reload the same script...
    aScript = document.createElement("script");
    aScript.src = "ClassA.js";
    document.head.appendChild(aScript);
    //...throws error: (ClassA.js:1 Uncaught SyntaxError: Identifier 
    //'ClassA' has already been declared at VM1088 ClassA.js:1)
};

aScript.src = "ClassA.js"; //loading the script for the first time.
document.head.appendChild(aScript);

Although I'm removing/deleting the script, the class object (ClassA) is still referenced in memory.

Uncaught SyntaxError: Identifier 'ClassA' has already been declared

Is it possible to remove a es6 class from memory? What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

EDIT

The solutions for the script to be loaded:

window.ClassA = class {
    constructor() {
        console.log("ClassA object created");
    }
}

or

(function(window) {
    class ClassA {
        constructor() {
            console.log("ClassA object created");
        }
    }
}(window))

this way the same script/class can be load, delete and loaded again. See traktor53 post for further information.

8
  • The delete operator is actually for deleting an object property, not a variable – Sterling Archer Jan 29 '18 at 20:17
  • 1
    Objects in memory exist independently of the script that creates them. You need to reinitialize all the global variables that were created. – Barmar Jan 29 '18 at 20:17
  • deleting the script from the dom isn't going to help with your problem. just fyi. – Kevin B Jan 29 '18 at 20:19
  • @Barmar Does that mean a page reload? – Perry Jan 29 '18 at 20:36
  • 1
    window.ClassA = null; – Barmar Jan 29 '18 at 20:44
3

No, it is not possible to remove an ES6 (ECMA2015) class declaration from memory.

In regards the script element, the JavaScript engine parses and runs the script after it has been loaded. Running the script declares ClassA in global scope. Deleting the script element doesn't remove the declaration - in the same way deleting the source file of a compiled program won't delete an object or executable file already created from it.

ES6 also introduced special arrangements for let variables, constants and classes: they are block scoped and may not be re-declared in the same block or in global scope. Trying to do so is considered a programming error:

{    // in same block scope
     let sameName = "0"; // first declaration is ok, but
     let sameName = "0"; // syntax error: redeclartion of "sameName", or
     const sameName = 0; // syntax error: redeclaration of "sameName", or
     class sameName {};  // syntax error: redeclaration of "sameName", or
}

In addition, and unlike variables declared using var, block-scoped identifiers declared in global scope using let, const or class are not made properties of the global object.

update correction: Class names are read-write and behave more like let than const declarations. You can assign a new value to a class name using the assignment operator ('=') - but attempting to declare the name a second time within global scope, or within the same block, will throw an error.

A snippet to demonstrate these aspects of class name declarations:

class ClassA {
    constructor() {
        console.log("ClassA object created");
    }
};

console.log(ClassA); // the class
console.log("ClassA is a " + typeof ClassA); // function
console.log("window ClassA property: " + 
  ( window.hasOwnProperty("ClassA") ? "yes" : "no")
);
console.log("typeof window.ClassA " + typeof window.ClassA);
 
ClassA=null;
if( ClassA === null) {
    console.log( "ClassA is assignable");
}
else {
    console.log( "ClassA is not assignable");
}

Attempting to redeclare classA at the end of the above snippet will generate an error about the redeclaration when the code is parsed - the code will not execute at all.

A solution could be to define ClassA as a global object property using a class expression:

// declare ClassA as a global property variable
window.ClassA =  class {
    constructor() {
        console.log("ClassA object created");
    }
}


console.log(ClassA); // the class
console.log(typeof ClassA); // function
delete window.ClassA; // remove global object property
console.log(typeof window.ClassA); // undefined

( A var declaration instead of the window property was not tested).

7
  • thanks, I think this is the right answer to my problem. But is there a reason for a class to follow the const declaration pattern? – Perry Jan 29 '18 at 21:02
  • @traktor53 they claim that classes are syntactical suger over constructor functions.It doesn't create any problem if i replace classA with functin classA.Doesn't even throw any error.why it throws error with class declaration.If those two are same ,they should behave same – AL-zami Jan 29 '18 at 21:26
  • The claim that classes are syntactic sugar for constructor functions is a) fashionable, and b) of limited use as a statement. There are intentional differences - the claim is that you can reproduce most of the behavior of class declarations using older coding techniques if you really, really want to. – traktor Jan 29 '18 at 21:33
  • @traktor53 - thanks a lot! I also got another way to get it working and updated my post with both solutions, but your way is far better. Also, can you point me some articles about this? thanks again! – Perry Jan 29 '18 at 22:24
  • I've updated the answer and deleted a comment - after finding class names are read/write identifiers, not constant, a mistake on my part. I'll keep an eye out for useful articles. – traktor Jan 30 '18 at 0:48

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