21

I am developing an SPA using Vue 2.0. The components developed so far are for the "desktop" browsers, for example, I have

Main.vue, ProductList.vue, ProductDetail.vue,

I want another set of components for the mobile browsers, such as MainMobile.vue, ProductListMobile.vue, ProductDetailMobile.vue,

My question is, where and how do I make my SPA render the mobile version of components when viewing in a mobile browser?

Please note that I explicitly want to avoid making my components responsive. I want to keep two separate versions of them.

Thanks,

23

I have an idea, use a mixin which detects is the browser mobile or desktop (example for js code in this answer ).. then use v-if, for example

<production-list v-if="!isMobile()"></production-list>
<production-list-mobile v-else></production-list-mobile>

so here is an example on https://jsfiddle.net/Ldku0xec/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You could also use named views and apply isMobile logic on <router-view> instance to avoid duplicating this logic on every component. – NimaAJ Jan 30 '18 at 17:42
  • 1
    Can also use v-if and v-else, which I'd certainly prefer. – jhpratt GOFUNDME RELICENSING Aug 7 '18 at 22:15
26

I have simple solution for Vue.js:

<div v-if="!isMobile()">
  <desktop>
  </desktop>
</div>
<div v-else>
  <mobile>
  </mobile>
</div>

And methods:

methods: {
 isMobile() {
   if(/Android|webOS|iPhone|iPad|iPod|BlackBerry|IEMobile|Opera Mini/i.test(navigator.userAgent)) {
     return true
   } else {
     return false
   }
 }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    there is a syntax error after iPhone (| instead of ||) – Asqan Jan 7 '19 at 15:20
  • 2
    it's good but use return ... instead of a if (...) { return true } else { return false } – Jon Nimrod Dec 23 '19 at 15:20
  • I've been doing some research and apparently it's rarely a good idea to use user agent sniffing for mobile device detection. I would refer you to the following documentation developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/…, where you can look for the "Mobile device detection" section. It shows you how to detect a mobile device by checking whether or not it has a touch screen, falling back to user agent sniffing only as a last resort. Hope that helps. – user7191932 Apr 12 at 8:57
9

I had this same problem, I solved it using a neutral and no layout vue file (Init.vue) that will be accessed by mobile and desktop, and this file redirects to the correct file.

Let's suppose that I have the Main.vue and the MainMobile.vue. I will add an Init.vue that will redirect. So my router/index.js is that:

import Router from 'vue-router'
import Vue from 'vue'
import Main from '@/components/Main'
import MainMobile from '@/components/MainMobile'
import Init from '@/components/Init'

Vue.use(Router)

export default new Router({
  routes: [
     {
        path: '/',
        name: 'Root',
        component: Init
     },
    {
      path: '/Main',
      name: 'Main',
      component: Main
    },
    {
      path: '/MainMobile',
      name: 'MainMobile',
      component: MainMobile
    },
  ]
})

At the Init.vue file, the mobile/desktop detection will happen:

<template>
</template>
<script>
    export default {
        name: 'Init',
        methods: {
            isMobile() {
                if( screen.width <= 760 ) {
                    return true;
                }
                else {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        },
        created() {
            if (this.isMobile()) {
                this.$router.push('/MainMobile');
            }
            else {
                this.$router.push('/Main');
            }
        }
    }
</script>
<style scoped>
</style>

The isMobile() function used is very simple, you can change to any other.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Best solution in my opinion. This way you can use the real screen size which is much more secure and efficient than checking the user agent/device/what ever. – Brotzka Jun 20 '19 at 4:26
6

A bit late for this but, in case if any of you are looking to bind watchers for the viewport size, and/or check whenever the page loads. Its a lot of boilerplate to write but can be useful for small applications.

export default {
  data: () => ({
    isMobile: false
  }),

  beforeDestroy () {
    if (typeof window !== 'undefined') {
      window.removeEventListener('resize', this.onResize, { passive: true })
    }
  },

  mounted () {
    this.onResize()
    window.addEventListener('resize', this.onResize, { passive: true })
  },

  methods: {
    onResize () {
      this.isMobile = window.innerWidth < 600
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • guess there is no way to prevent showing the element on reload for a second before device detection grips... – mangrove108 Jan 28 at 15:12
  • isnt this resizelistener heavy? a resize observer with a cross browser polyfill would be much better IMO – PirateApp May 20 at 5:46
5

I was looking for a solution for this and came here but I couldn't find what I needed:

  1. Asynchronous imports to only load into the bundle what was needed based on the viewport.
  2. Capability to serve a different layout if the layout was resized

I mixed and matched a few things I read online including answers here so I thought I'd just come back and put all my learnings into one function for anyone else looking:

/**
 * Breakpoint configuration to be in line with element-ui's standards
 * @type {{LABELS: string[], VALUES: number[]}}
 */
const BREAKPOINTS = {
    LABELS: ['xs', 'sm', 'md', 'lg', 'xl'],
    VALUES: [0, 768, 992, 1200, 1920, Infinity]
};


/**
 * @typedef ViewFactory
 * @type function
 * A function which returns a promise which resolves to a view. Used to dynamically fetch a view file on the fly during
 * run time on a need basis
 */


/**
 * A helper to get a responsive route factory which renders different views based on the current view point
 * @param {{xs:[ViewFactory],sm:[ViewFactory],md:[ViewFactory],lg:[ViewFactory]}} map - A map of breakpoint key to a ViewFactory
 * @returns {ViewFactory} - A view factory which invokes and returns an item supplied in the map based on the current viewport size
 */
export default function responsiveRoute(map) {
    return function getResponsiveView() {
        const screenWidth = document.documentElement.clientWidth;

        // Find the matching index for the current screen width
        const matchIndex = BREAKPOINTS.VALUES.findIndex((item, idx) => {
            if (idx === 0) {
                return false;
            }
            return screenWidth >= BREAKPOINTS.VALUES[idx - 1] && screenWidth < BREAKPOINTS.VALUES[idx];
        }) - 1;


        if (map[BREAKPOINTS.LABELS[matchIndex]]) {
            // Perfect match, use it
            return map[BREAKPOINTS.LABELS[matchIndex]]();
        } else {
            // Go down the responsive break points list until a match is found
            let counter = matchIndex;
            while (counter-- > 0) {
                if (map[BREAKPOINTS.LABELS[counter]]) {
                    return map[BREAKPOINTS.LABELS[counter]]();
                }
            }
            return Promise.reject({
                code: 500,
                info: 'No component matched the breakpoint - probably a configuration error'
            });
        }
    };
} 

Usage:

const router = new Router({
    mode: 'history',
    base: process.env.BASE_URL,
    routes:[{
      path: '/login',
      name: 'login',
      component: responsiveRoute({
          // route level code-splitting
          // this generates a separate chunk (login-xs.[hash].js) for this route
          // which is lazy-loaded when the route is visited.
          xs: () => import(/* webpackChunkName: "login-xs" */ './views/Login/Login-xs.vue'),
          // sm key is missing, it falls back to xs
          md: () => import(/* webpackChunkName: "login-md" */ './views/Login/Login-md.vue')
          // lg, xl keys are missing falls back to md
      }) 
  }]
}); 

How it works:

Vue Router supports defining the component key as a function which returns a promise to support async routes. The most common way being to use the webpack import() function which returns a promise. The function which returns the promise is only invoked when the route is about to be rendered ensuring we can lazy load our components

The responsiveRoute function accepts a map of these functions with keys set for different breakpoints and returns a function which, when invoked, checks the available viewport size and returns invokes the correct promise factory and return's the promise returned by it.

Notes:

I like this method because it does not require the application architecture or route configurations to be in a certain way. It's pretty plug and play using Vue Router capabilities provided out of the box. It also does not force you to define a view for every breakpoint-route combination. You can define a route as usual without this(lazy loaded or not) along side other routes that use this without any problems.

This method does not use user agent sniffing but uses the available width of the document.documentElement instead. Other methods I saw recommended things like window.screen.width which gives the exact device screen size regardless of the window size or a more robust window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth || document.body.clientWidth. Mix and match as needed.

My break points are (number and their values) are based on element-ui breakpoints as I used that for normal responsive design. This can again be configured as needed by changing the constants at the top

| improve this answer | |
3

A bit late for this but, in case if any of you are looking for I handled the situation like this: I added meta to my router:

const router = new Router({
     routes: [{
      path: '/main-view
      name: 'mainView',
      component: MainView,
      meta: {
        'hasMobileView': true
      }
     },
    {
     path: '/mobile-view',
      name: 'mobileView',
      component: mobileView,
      meta: {
        'hasDesktopView': true
      }
     },
    }]
})

then on beforeeach function 

router.beforeEach((to, from, next) => {
  const hasMobileView = to.matched.some((route) => route.meta.hasMobileView)
  if (hasMobileView) {
    if (navigator.userAgent.match(/Android/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/webOS/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/iPod/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/BlackBerry/i) ||
      navigator.userAgent.match(/Windows Phone/i)) {
      next('/mobile-view')
    } else {
      next()
    }
  }
})`

| improve this answer | |
3

An extended version of Beaudinn Greves answer:

  • Use named router views
  • listen on window resize and set isMobile true if width smaller then xy
  • in router.js use "components" instead of "component" and import (you may use require) the desktop and mobile components

App.vue:

<template>
  <div id="app" class="container grid-lg">
    <router-view v-if="!store.app.isMobile"/>
    <router-view v-else name="mobile"/>
  </div>
</template>
...
name: "app",
  data: function() {
  return {
    store: this.$store.state
  };
},
mounted () {
  this.onResize()
  window.addEventListener('resize', this.onResize, { passive: true })
},
methods: {
  onResize () {
    this.store.app.isMobile = window.innerWidth < 600
  }
},
beforeDestroy () {
  if (typeof window !== 'undefined') {
    window.removeEventListener('resize', this.onResize, { passive: true })
  }
}

router.js:

routes: [
  {
    path: '/',
    name: 'home',
    components: {
      default: Home,
      mobile: HomeMobile
    }
  }
]
| improve this answer | |
  • This is the best method if two page is completely different for PC and Mobile – Hùng Nguyễn Dec 13 '19 at 2:40
  • @EscapeNetscape I tried your solution but it didn't work out :/ I mean, the state of isMobile is being saved in the data prop "Store" but I can't make it work for the Router.js to render the default or the mobile component based in the global prop "store" you know? – juanpablob Apr 24 at 10:48
  • @juanpablob you just have to adapt to your code and your way of storing data. Most use vuex, I use a different approach for using a global store. – EscapeNetscape Apr 24 at 18:28
0

I have a better solution.In src/main.js:

 if (condition) {
    require('./pc/main)
 }else {
    require('./mobile/main')
}
| improve this answer | |

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